Full page view
HISTORY

The working title for this picture was L’Occident, after the 1913 play by Henry Kistemaeckers upon which it was based. The 19 May 1918 New-York Tribune announced that Screen Classics, Inc. had acquired screen rights to the play for lead actress Nazimova. The play was translated by Nazimova’s sister, Nina Lewton, and adapted for the screen by June Mathis and Albert Capellani. Nazimova’s then husband, Charles Bryant, was cast opposite her in the role of “Captain de Cadiere.” Principal photography began under Capellani’s direction on 10 June 1918, as reported in the 22 June 1918 Moving Picture World, which included Richard Barthelmess in a list of cast members. (Barthelmess did not appear in the role in which he was cast, “Ensign Arnauld,” ultimately played by Donald Gallaher.) French technical director Henri Menessier created “art drawings of sets and scenery” that were to be executed by E. J. Shulter. Shooting took place in New York City, as noted in the 24 August 1918, which also stated that some scenes were filmed aboard a French cruiser, loaned to the production by “representatives of the French government and the ship’s officers.”
       A title change to Eye for Eye was announced in the 14 September 1918 Moving Picture World. Nazimova was said to have chosen the name from a list of fifty options. The actress explained her choice by stating, “It exactly expresses the meaning of the play…Kistemaeckers wanted to bring out in his great drama the vital difference between the standards of the Eastern and the Western worlds—the Orient and the Occident…‘Eye for eye and tooth for tooth’ is the rule throughout ...

More Less

The working title for this picture was L’Occident, after the 1913 play by Henry Kistemaeckers upon which it was based. The 19 May 1918 New-York Tribune announced that Screen Classics, Inc. had acquired screen rights to the play for lead actress Nazimova. The play was translated by Nazimova’s sister, Nina Lewton, and adapted for the screen by June Mathis and Albert Capellani. Nazimova’s then husband, Charles Bryant, was cast opposite her in the role of “Captain de Cadiere.” Principal photography began under Capellani’s direction on 10 June 1918, as reported in the 22 June 1918 Moving Picture World, which included Richard Barthelmess in a list of cast members. (Barthelmess did not appear in the role in which he was cast, “Ensign Arnauld,” ultimately played by Donald Gallaher.) French technical director Henri Menessier created “art drawings of sets and scenery” that were to be executed by E. J. Shulter. Shooting took place in New York City, as noted in the 24 August 1918, which also stated that some scenes were filmed aboard a French cruiser, loaned to the production by “representatives of the French government and the ship’s officers.”
       A title change to Eye for Eye was announced in the 14 September 1918 Moving Picture World. Nazimova was said to have chosen the name from a list of fifty options. The actress explained her choice by stating, “It exactly expresses the meaning of the play…Kistemaeckers wanted to bring out in his great drama the vital difference between the standards of the Eastern and the Western worlds—the Orient and the Occident…‘Eye for eye and tooth for tooth’ is the rule throughout the Orient. It is the Mussulman’s creed.”
       This film was shown at a pre-release trade screening in New York on 18 November 1918. It opened in Milwaukee, WI, on 24 November 1918, and in New York on 22 December 1918.
       According to the Library of Congress American Silent Feature Film Survival Database, this film is extant.

Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Butte Miner [Butte, MT]
28 Jul 1918
p. 41
Edmonton Journal [Edmonton, Canada]
31 Aug 1918
p. 17
Exhibitors Trade Review
23 Nov 1918
p. 1962, 1990-91
Los Angeles Evening Express
22 Jun 1918
p. 7
Motion Picture News
28 Jul 1917
p. 604
Motion Picture News
24 Aug 1918
p. 1241
Motion Picture News
30 Nov 1918
p. 3267
Motography
29 Jun 1918
p. 1215
Moving Picture World
22 Jun 1918
p. 1735
Moving Picture World
14 Sep 1918
p. 1568
Moving Picture World
5 Oct 1918
p. 103
Moving Picture World
30 Nov 1918
p. 987, 989
New-York Tribune
19 May 1918
p. 37
NYDM
16 Mar 1918
p. 1555
Oakland Tribune [Oakland, CA]
8 Sep 1918
p. 46
Photoplay Magazine
Nov 1918
---
Quad-City Times [Davenport, IA]
9 Jun 1918
p. 14
Variety
22 Nov 1918
p. 44
Wid's Daily
29 Dec 1918
pp. 21-22
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
L'Occident
Release Date:
November 1918
Premiere Information:
Milwaukee, WI, opening: 24 Nov 1918; New York opening: 22 Dec 1918
Production Date:
10 Jun--late Aug 1918
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Metro Pictures Corp.
4 December 1918
LP13166
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Hassouna, the sheik's daughter, helps a French soldier, Captain de Cadiere, escape from the Bedouins, and because of her betrayal is left to die in the desert. The girl is captured by a wandering tribe and sold to Rambert, a circus proprietor who has been looking for a dancer. Cadiere sees her at the circus and adopts her despite the protests of his wife Helene. Hassouna, who loves Cadiere, consoles him after his wife elopes with another man, but her love turns to hatred when she learns from Taieb, her former suitor, that the captain was responsible for the death of her family. She plans to exact her revenge by ruining the reputation of Ensign Arnauld, Cadiere's beloved nephew, but learns in time that Taieb's accusations were false and that her love for Cadiere is too great to do him ...

More Less

Hassouna, the sheik's daughter, helps a French soldier, Captain de Cadiere, escape from the Bedouins, and because of her betrayal is left to die in the desert. The girl is captured by a wandering tribe and sold to Rambert, a circus proprietor who has been looking for a dancer. Cadiere sees her at the circus and adopts her despite the protests of his wife Helene. Hassouna, who loves Cadiere, consoles him after his wife elopes with another man, but her love turns to hatred when she learns from Taieb, her former suitor, that the captain was responsible for the death of her family. She plans to exact her revenge by ruining the reputation of Ensign Arnauld, Cadiere's beloved nephew, but learns in time that Taieb's accusations were false and that her love for Cadiere is too great to do him harm.

Less

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

Life of an American Fireman

The Edison catalog summary is as follows: "It would be difficult for the exhibitor to conceive the amount of work involved and the number of rehearsals necessary to produce ... >>

Singin' in the Rain

According to a 5 Feb 1951 HR news item, Carleton Carpenter was to co-star in the film with Gene Kelly and Debbie Reynolds, and a 19 Mar ... >>

Psycho

Actor Vaughn Taylor's surname is misspelled "Tayler" in the onscreen credits. Several Jun and Jul 1959 HR news items erroneously refer to the film as Psyche. ... >>

Gone with the Wind

[ Note from the Editors : the following information is based on contemporary news items, feature articles, reviews, interviews, memoranda and corporate records. Information obtained from modern sources ... >>

The Maltese Falcon

The working titles of this film were All Women , A Woman of the World and Dangerous Female . In the onscreen credits of ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.