Sunny Skies (1930)

65 mins | Musical comedy | 12 May 1930

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HISTORY

The 28 Dec 1929 Motion Picture News announced the upcoming production as one of several projects to begin the following month at Tiffany Studios in Hollywood, CA. Principal photography began on 27 Jan 1930, as stated in the 15 Feb 1930 Exhibitors Herald-World. Additional cast members included Pauline Garon (1 Feb 1930 Inside Facts of Stage and Screen), Jackie Heller (19 Feb 1930 Var), and Mary Foy (26 Feb 1930 Var).
       The completion of filming was reported in the 25 Feb 1930 Film Daily. Editing began the following month, as noted in the 16 Mar 1930 issue.
       Sunny Skies opened 12 May 1930, and made its New York City debut that same month at the Colony Theatre. The 21 May 1930 Var revealed that Tiffany-Stahl Productions, Inc., had rented the facility for two weeks to showcase their latest releases. Reviews were generally lukewarm, with several dismissing the production as a typical college musical. The 24 May 1930 Harrison’s Reports strongly objected to the film, particularly its portrayal of college life as a series of drunken “petting” parties. The review noted that the RCA Photophone soundtrack was also available on disc.
       According to the 10 May 1930 Motion Picture News, Bibo-Lang, Inc., acquired publishing rights to three songs written for the film by Val Burton and Will Jason: “You For Me,” “It Must Be Love,” and “Wanna Find A Boy.” Versions of “You For Me” and “It Must Be Love” were recorded by Tom Clines for Brunswick Records, ...

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The 28 Dec 1929 Motion Picture News announced the upcoming production as one of several projects to begin the following month at Tiffany Studios in Hollywood, CA. Principal photography began on 27 Jan 1930, as stated in the 15 Feb 1930 Exhibitors Herald-World. Additional cast members included Pauline Garon (1 Feb 1930 Inside Facts of Stage and Screen), Jackie Heller (19 Feb 1930 Var), and Mary Foy (26 Feb 1930 Var).
       The completion of filming was reported in the 25 Feb 1930 Film Daily. Editing began the following month, as noted in the 16 Mar 1930 issue.
       Sunny Skies opened 12 May 1930, and made its New York City debut that same month at the Colony Theatre. The 21 May 1930 Var revealed that Tiffany-Stahl Productions, Inc., had rented the facility for two weeks to showcase their latest releases. Reviews were generally lukewarm, with several dismissing the production as a typical college musical. The 24 May 1930 Harrison’s Reports strongly objected to the film, particularly its portrayal of college life as a series of drunken “petting” parties. The review noted that the RCA Photophone soundtrack was also available on disc.
       According to the 10 May 1930 Motion Picture News, Bibo-Lang, Inc., acquired publishing rights to three songs written for the film by Val Burton and Will Jason: “You For Me,” “It Must Be Love,” and “Wanna Find A Boy.” Versions of “You For Me” and “It Must Be Love” were recorded by Tom Clines for Brunswick Records, and by Eddie Walters for Columbia Records, respectively.
       A vaudeville sketch, also titled “Sunny Skies,” was mentioned in the 6 Mar 1929 Var.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Educational Screen
Dec 1930
p. 305
Exhibitors Herald-World
15 Feb 1930
p. 54
Film Daily
10 Feb 1930
p. 8
Film Daily
25 Feb 1930
p. 4
Film Daily
16 Mar 1930
p. 1
Film Daily
18 May 1930
p. 13
Harrison's Reports
24 May 1930
p. 82
Hollywood Fillmograph
1 Feb 1930
p. 5, 15
Hollywood Fillmograph
12 Apr 1930
p. 28
Inside Facts of Stage and Screen
1 Feb 1930
p. 5
Motion Picture News
28 Dec 1929
p. 12
Motion Picture News
22 Mar 1930
p. 43
Motion Picture News
10 May 1930
p. 37
Motion Picture News
24 May 1930
p. 117
Motion Picture News
28 Jun 1930
p. 104
National Board of Review Magazine
May-Jun 1930
p. 29
New Movie Magazine
Oct 1930
p. 6
New York Times
17 May 1930
p. 21
Screenland
Aug 1930
p. 89
Variety
6 Mar 1929
p. 8
Variety
19 Feb 1930
p. 30
Variety
26 Feb 1930
p. 32
Variety
14 May 1930
p. 27
Variety
21 May 1930
p. 27
Variety
28 May 1930
p. 83
Variety
2 Jul 1930
p. 72
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Tech dir
PRODUCER
Studio exec
WRITERS
Earl Snell
Continuity
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
FILM EDITOR
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
Rec eng
SOURCES
SONGS
"Sunny Days", "It Must Be Love," "Wanna Find a Boy," "So Long," and "You For Me," by Will Jason and Val Burton; "The Laugh Song," by Will Jason, Val Burton and Benny Rubin.
PERFORMED BY
+
SONGWRITER/COMPOSER
DETAILS
Release Date:
12 May 1930
Production Date:
27 Jan--late Feb 1930
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Tiffany Productions, Inc.
1 May 1930
LP1266
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Photophone
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
65
Length(in feet):
6,994
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Jim Grant, a cocky college athlete, falls in love with Mary Norris, who returns his affection, even though she is claimed by Dave, star player on the football team. Jim finds a loyal friend in roommate Benny Krantz, the shy, blundering son of a delicatessen keeper. Mary’s friend, Doris, takes a liking to Benny and teaches him about romance. Jim’s heavy drinking leads to his alienation of Mary, when she discovers him in the arms of another girl. He is also disqualified from the football team for failing in his studies. Jim tries to apologize to Mary, but when Dave intervenes, a scuffle ensues and Jim accidentally breaks his rival’s arm. With Dave unable to play, the school loses an important football game and Jim is expelled. The following year, Benny tries to emulate his boisterous ex-roommate, resulting in his fall from a second-story window during a drunken party. Jim, who has recently returned to college, saves Benny’s life with a blood transfusion. He scores the winning touchdown at a football game, then faints from the loss of blood. Later that day, Jim and Bennie are reunited in the ...

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Jim Grant, a cocky college athlete, falls in love with Mary Norris, who returns his affection, even though she is claimed by Dave, star player on the football team. Jim finds a loyal friend in roommate Benny Krantz, the shy, blundering son of a delicatessen keeper. Mary’s friend, Doris, takes a liking to Benny and teaches him about romance. Jim’s heavy drinking leads to his alienation of Mary, when she discovers him in the arms of another girl. He is also disqualified from the football team for failing in his studies. Jim tries to apologize to Mary, but when Dave intervenes, a scuffle ensues and Jim accidentally breaks his rival’s arm. With Dave unable to play, the school loses an important football game and Jim is expelled. The following year, Benny tries to emulate his boisterous ex-roommate, resulting in his fall from a second-story window during a drunken party. Jim, who has recently returned to college, saves Benny’s life with a blood transfusion. He scores the winning touchdown at a football game, then faints from the loss of blood. Later that day, Jim and Bennie are reunited in the hospital.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.