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HISTORY

One reviewer assigns the role of Col. Gascoyne to Carl Stockdale, Bewley to John Gough, Wintermute to Robert Klein, and Hoskins to Howard Davies. The working title of the film was Adrienne Gascoyne. This was the first picture made by William Russell Productions, Inc. ...

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One reviewer assigns the role of Col. Gascoyne to Carl Stockdale, Bewley to John Gough, Wintermute to Robert Klein, and Hoskins to Howard Davies. The working title of the film was Adrienne Gascoyne. This was the first picture made by William Russell Productions, Inc.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
ETR
27 Apr 1918
p. 1647
ETR
4 May 1918
p. 1771
MPW
11 May 1918
p. 893, 902
Wid's
20 Apr 1918
p. 2420
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITER
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the short story "Adrienne Gascoyne" by William Hamilton Osborne in Illustrated Sunday Magazine (1 Aug 1915).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Adrienne Gascoyne
Release Date:
29 April 1918
Production Date:

Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

Wealthy diamond collector Larry Hanrahan is given the opportunity to assist the beautiful, jewel-bedecked woman he admires in a Broadway café when she and her guardian are attacked by robbers. Larry is invited to visit the grateful pair, Col. Paul Gascoyne and his ward Adrienne, at the colonel's laboratory, where he is introduced to Wintermute, a chemist who produces imitation diamonds. In return, Larry asks them to view his priceless diamond collection. Although he has fallen in love with Adrienne, Larry is forced to believe that she is a thief when he is robbed by a woman wearing Adrienne's scarf. Larry finds his jewels in Gascoyne's house, but before he can escape, a group of thugs overpowers him. Adrienne assists him in contacting the police, who arrive in time to capture Gascoyne and his gang. Badly wounded, the colonel confesses that Adrienne has been his innocent dupe, whereupon Larry happily takes her to his ...

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Wealthy diamond collector Larry Hanrahan is given the opportunity to assist the beautiful, jewel-bedecked woman he admires in a Broadway café when she and her guardian are attacked by robbers. Larry is invited to visit the grateful pair, Col. Paul Gascoyne and his ward Adrienne, at the colonel's laboratory, where he is introduced to Wintermute, a chemist who produces imitation diamonds. In return, Larry asks them to view his priceless diamond collection. Although he has fallen in love with Adrienne, Larry is forced to believe that she is a thief when he is robbed by a woman wearing Adrienne's scarf. Larry finds his jewels in Gascoyne's house, but before he can escape, a group of thugs overpowers him. Adrienne assists him in contacting the police, who arrive in time to capture Gascoyne and his gang. Badly wounded, the colonel confesses that Adrienne has been his innocent dupe, whereupon Larry happily takes her to his heart.

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GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Crime


Subject
Subject (Major):

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.