Sweet Rosie O'Grady (1926)

Comedy-drama | 10 October 1926

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HISTORY

The Variety review listed the film's title as Rosie O'Grady.
       The film, inspired by the 1896 song of the same name by Maude Nugent, was in development at Columbia Pictures Corp. as of mid-February 1926. The 13 February 1926 Motion Picture News announced that King Meighan, brother of actor Thomas Meighan, was poised to make his feature film acting debut in Sweet Rosie O’Grady, which was slated to be shot at Columbia’s studio in Hollywood, CA. Months later, the 30 May 1926 Film Daily reported that production was set to begin soon under the direction of Frank R. Strayer. However, production appears to have been delayed by the departure of actress May McAvoy, according to a news brief in the 23 June 1926 Variety which announced that Waldorf Productions, Inc. (a company associated with Columbia) had filed a lawsuit against McAvoy, alleging that the actress had refused to participate in costume fittings and had dropped out of the picture ten days prior to the scheduled start of shooting in early May 1926. Waldorf sought $110,000 in damages.
       Shirley Mason replaced McAvoy and filming got underway by early August 1926, as indicated by the 9 August 1926 Film Daily. The 21 August 1926 Motion Picture News claimed that the picture was “being rushed to completion,” and the 25 August 1926 Variety confirmed that filming had ended.
       Theatrical release occurred the week of 10 October 1926, according to a 16 October 1926 Exhibitors Herald release chart. A review in the 26 September 1926 Film Daily deemed it ...

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The Variety review listed the film's title as Rosie O'Grady.
       The film, inspired by the 1896 song of the same name by Maude Nugent, was in development at Columbia Pictures Corp. as of mid-February 1926. The 13 February 1926 Motion Picture News announced that King Meighan, brother of actor Thomas Meighan, was poised to make his feature film acting debut in Sweet Rosie O’Grady, which was slated to be shot at Columbia’s studio in Hollywood, CA. Months later, the 30 May 1926 Film Daily reported that production was set to begin soon under the direction of Frank R. Strayer. However, production appears to have been delayed by the departure of actress May McAvoy, according to a news brief in the 23 June 1926 Variety which announced that Waldorf Productions, Inc. (a company associated with Columbia) had filed a lawsuit against McAvoy, alleging that the actress had refused to participate in costume fittings and had dropped out of the picture ten days prior to the scheduled start of shooting in early May 1926. Waldorf sought $110,000 in damages.
       Shirley Mason replaced McAvoy and filming got underway by early August 1926, as indicated by the 9 August 1926 Film Daily. The 21 August 1926 Motion Picture News claimed that the picture was “being rushed to completion,” and the 25 August 1926 Variety confirmed that filming had ended.
       Theatrical release occurred the week of 10 October 1926, according to a 16 October 1926 Exhibitors Herald release chart. A review in the 26 September 1926 Film Daily deemed it “a first rate audience picture” with “the Jewish-Irish comedy element predominant.”
       The National Film Preservation Board (NFPB) included the picture on its list of Lost U.S. Silent Feature Films as of February 2021.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Herald
16 Oct 1926
p. 64
Film Daily
30 May 1926
---
Film Daily
9 Aug 1926
p. 4
Film Daily
26 Sep 1926
p. 11
Motion Picture News
13 Feb 1926
p. 784, 791
Motion Picture News
12 Jun 1926
p. 2756
Motion Picture News
19 Jun 1926
---
Motion Picture News
21 Aug 1926
p. 685
Motion Picture News
16 Oct 1926
p. 1497
Motion Picture News
20 Nov 1926
p. 1940
Moving Picture World
20 Mar 1926
p. 175
Moving Picture World
2 Oct 1926
---
New York Times
9 Dec 1926
p. 33
Variety
23 Jun 1926
p. 9
Variety
25 Aug 1926
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCER
Supv
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
SOURCES
LITERARY
Suggested by the song "Sweet Rosie O'Grady" by Maude Nugent (1896).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Rosie O'
Rosie O'Grady
Release Date:
10 October 1926
Premiere Information:
New York trade showing: 17 Sep 1926
Production Date:
August 1926
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Columbia Pictures Corp.
22 November 1926
LP23366
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
6,108
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Rosie, an orphan, grows to womanhood under the care of Uncle Ben, a genial pawnbroker, and Brady, an Irish policeman. One day Rosie rescues Victor McQuade, a youth of the fashionable set, from some ruffians, and tends his wounds in the pawnshop. The next day, Victor, in a uniform borrowed from his chauffeur, calls to take Rosie for a ride; at his home she is detained by his sister, Muriel, who is giving a "poverty party." Rosie accidentally gets shoved in among the guests and wins first prize for having the most comical costume. Angry and mortified, she flees from Victor to Uncle Ben, who consents to her going to live with Brady in his comfortable home. Victor, intent on marrying Rosie, abducts her from Brady's home, and when they are stopped by a policeman, they have him perform the marriage ...

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Rosie, an orphan, grows to womanhood under the care of Uncle Ben, a genial pawnbroker, and Brady, an Irish policeman. One day Rosie rescues Victor McQuade, a youth of the fashionable set, from some ruffians, and tends his wounds in the pawnshop. The next day, Victor, in a uniform borrowed from his chauffeur, calls to take Rosie for a ride; at his home she is detained by his sister, Muriel, who is giving a "poverty party." Rosie accidentally gets shoved in among the guests and wins first prize for having the most comical costume. Angry and mortified, she flees from Victor to Uncle Ben, who consents to her going to live with Brady in his comfortable home. Victor, intent on marrying Rosie, abducts her from Brady's home, and when they are stopped by a policeman, they have him perform the marriage ceremony.

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GENRE
Genre:


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.