The Life Line (1919)

Drama | 5 October 1919

Full page view
HISTORY

Sims' play was the basis for a 1914 three-reeler starring Marion Leonard and a 1915 British feature, both called The Romany Rye. ...

More Less

Sims' play was the basis for a 1914 three-reeler starring Marion Leonard and a 1915 British feature, both called The Romany Rye.

Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
ETR
11 Oct 1919
p. 1653
MPN
11 Oct 1919
p. 2897
MPW
20 Dec 1919
p. 1013
New York Morning Telegraph
25 Jan 1920
p. 6
New York Times
29 Sep 1919
p. 16
NYR
4 Oct 1919
---
Variety
3 Oct 1919
p. 57
Wid's
12 Oct 1919
p. 18
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play The Romany Rye by George R. Sims (New York, 18 Sep 1882).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
5 October 1919
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Famous Players-Lasky Corp.
26 September 1919
LP14224
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
5,394
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

Jack Hearne, known as the Romany Rye, prefers living with the gypsies rather than claiming the right to his part of his half brother Phillip Royston's country estate, Cragsnest. When he saves Ruth Heckett, the daughter of his friend Joe, a London birdshop owner and burglar, from a theater fire, however, he changes his mind and marries her. As Ruth and Jack board a steamer for America to find witnesses to his parents' wedding for proof of his inheritance, Joe's partner Bos gives Ruth a Bible that he stole from Cragsnest, as a present. Unknown to them, the Bible contains the wedding certificate of Jack's parents, which Royston has been trying to recover so that he could destroy it. After Jack is lured off the steamer by Laura, a gypsy infatuated with Royston, blackjacked, drugged, and thrown into the water, Bos rescues him. At Southampton, where the steamer is wrecked, they save Ruth, who has discovered the certificate, and others in a breeches buoy, while Royston and Laura ...

More Less

Jack Hearne, known as the Romany Rye, prefers living with the gypsies rather than claiming the right to his part of his half brother Phillip Royston's country estate, Cragsnest. When he saves Ruth Heckett, the daughter of his friend Joe, a London birdshop owner and burglar, from a theater fire, however, he changes his mind and marries her. As Ruth and Jack board a steamer for America to find witnesses to his parents' wedding for proof of his inheritance, Joe's partner Bos gives Ruth a Bible that he stole from Cragsnest, as a present. Unknown to them, the Bible contains the wedding certificate of Jack's parents, which Royston has been trying to recover so that he could destroy it. After Jack is lured off the steamer by Laura, a gypsy infatuated with Royston, blackjacked, drugged, and thrown into the water, Bos rescues him. At Southampton, where the steamer is wrecked, they save Ruth, who has discovered the certificate, and others in a breeches buoy, while Royston and Laura drown.

Less

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

Stagecoach

The American folk songs adapted for the score included the traditional ballads "Lily Dale," "Rosa Lee," "Joe Bowers," "Joe the Wrangler," "She's More to Be Pitied Than Censured," "She ... >>

The Ten Commandments

The working title of this film was Prince of Egypt. Before the film’s onscreen credits, producer-director Cecil B. DeMille steps out from behind a curtain onto ... >>

Gone with the Wind

[ Note from the Editors : the following information is based on contemporary news items, feature articles, reviews, interviews, memoranda and corporate records. Information obtained from modern sources ... >>

Applause

Filming began on 10 June 1929 at Paramount's West Coast studio, according to the 15 June 1929 Exhibitors Herald-World. Working titles of the film included Portrait ... >>

Thirty Day Princess

A news item in DV indicates that although production was slated to begin on 28 Feb 1934, it was delayed due to the illness of William Collier ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.