A Midnight Romance (1919)

Drama | 10 March 1919

Full page view
HISTORY

According to Var the film's length was 6,800 feet at its New York opening. ...

More Less

According to Var the film's length was 6,800 feet at its New York opening.

Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
ETR
22 Mar 1919
p. 1213
MPN
22 Mar 1919
p. 1855
MPW
22 Mar 1919
p. 1696
Variety
20 Jul 1919
---
Wid's
14 Mar 1919
p. 3
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCERS
Prod
WRITER
Scen
PHOTOGRAPHY
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the story, "A Midnight Romance" by Marion Orth (publication undetermined).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
10 March 1919
Premiere Information:
New York opening: week of 9 Mar 1919; Los Angeles opening: week of 30 Mar 1919
Production Date:
ended late 1918
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
5,771
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

News that the wealthy Sloan family will visit a seaside hotel encourages adventurer Blinkey Deal and his cohort, Blondie Mazie, to stay at the resort so that Mazie can land young Roger Sloan as a husband. Roger soon tires of Mazie's attentions and, one moonlit evening at midnight, he falls for a beautiful girl swimming in a scanty one-piece suit. The girl, Marie, who became a hotel maid after the ship on which she was traveling was torpedoed, carefully eludes Roger until she appears at a ball in Mazie's fancy dress and falls in love. Discovering Mazie's plan to entrap Roger in a scandalous situation, Marie informs the Sloans, saves their reputation, and disappears. Several weeks later, Roger is invited to meet Countess Marie and is discouraged to learn that she is the hotel maid. However, when she explains that the Bolsheviks will probably destroy her throne, they happily agree to ...

More Less

News that the wealthy Sloan family will visit a seaside hotel encourages adventurer Blinkey Deal and his cohort, Blondie Mazie, to stay at the resort so that Mazie can land young Roger Sloan as a husband. Roger soon tires of Mazie's attentions and, one moonlit evening at midnight, he falls for a beautiful girl swimming in a scanty one-piece suit. The girl, Marie, who became a hotel maid after the ship on which she was traveling was torpedoed, carefully eludes Roger until she appears at a ball in Mazie's fancy dress and falls in love. Discovering Mazie's plan to entrap Roger in a scandalous situation, Marie informs the Sloans, saves their reputation, and disappears. Several weeks later, Roger is invited to meet Countess Marie and is discouraged to learn that she is the hotel maid. However, when she explains that the Bolsheviks will probably destroy her throne, they happily agree to marry.

Less

GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Society


Subject
Subject (Major):

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

The Unsuspected

Charlotte Armstrong's novel was serialized in The Saturday Evening Post between 11 Aug 1945 and 29 Sep 1945. This was the first film made for Michael Curtiz' ... >>

The White Tower

Contemporary news items add the following information about the production: RKO purchased James Ramsey Ullman's novel in Mar 1946 for $150,000. At that time, Edward Dmytryk was assigned to ... >>

King of Jazz

The 4 Jan 1930 Exhibitors Herald-World announced that the production starting date was 4 Nov 1929.
       The main title credits Paul Whiteman and his Band as "Exclusive ... >>

The Wizard of Oz

The following dedication appears in the opening credits: “For nearly forty years this story has given faithful service to the Young in Heart; and Time has been powerless to ... >>

It's a Wonderful Life

Philip Van Doren Stern's story, which, according to many contemporary and modern sources, was originally written in Nov 1939, was enclosed by him in his 1943 Christmas cards. Although ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.