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HISTORY

Principal photography began on 27 Dec 1927, according to the 18 Feb 1928 Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World. The 16 Feb 1928 Film Daily and 21 Mar 1928 Var noted that the picture had originally been intended as a program release, but was expanded to an eight-reel “special.” The final edit was approximately seven reels. Production took place at First National Studios in Burbank, CA. The Film Daily article credited E. M. Asher as production manager, while the 5 May 1928 Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World referred to him as a co-producer. The film employed a number of sets and props created for The Private Life of Helen of Troy (1927, see entry). An item in the Jun 1929 Photoplay noted that dancer Helen Fairweather also appeared in both productions. The Jul 1928 Screenland described the picture as a burlesque of its predecessor, which was a burlesque of the epic poem, The Iliad by Homer.
       Vamping Venus opened on 13 May 1928. Reviews were lukewarm, with the 27 Jun 1928 Var noting the influence and outright plagiarism of old vaudeville routines, including a lions’ den sketch originated by the team of Bobby Clark and Paul McCullough.
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Principal photography began on 27 Dec 1927, according to the 18 Feb 1928 Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World. The 16 Feb 1928 Film Daily and 21 Mar 1928 Var noted that the picture had originally been intended as a program release, but was expanded to an eight-reel “special.” The final edit was approximately seven reels. Production took place at First National Studios in Burbank, CA. The Film Daily article credited E. M. Asher as production manager, while the 5 May 1928 Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World referred to him as a co-producer. The film employed a number of sets and props created for The Private Life of Helen of Troy (1927, see entry). An item in the Jun 1929 Photoplay noted that dancer Helen Fairweather also appeared in both productions. The Jul 1928 Screenland described the picture as a burlesque of its predecessor, which was a burlesque of the epic poem, The Iliad by Homer.
       Vamping Venus opened on 13 May 1928. Reviews were lukewarm, with the 27 Jun 1928 Var noting the influence and outright plagiarism of old vaudeville routines, including a lions’ den sketch originated by the team of Bobby Clark and Paul McCullough.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Educational Screen
Jun 1928
p. 153
Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World
18 Feb 1928
p. 29, 33
Exhibitors Herald and Moving Picture World
5 May 1928
p. 33, 57
Film Daily
16 Feb 1928
p. 6
Film Daily
18 Apr 1928
p. 1
Film Daily
11 Nov 1928
---
Harrison's Reports
12 May 1928
p. 75
Harrison's Reports
26 May 1928
p. 85
MPN Booking Guide
1929
p. 160
Photoplay
May 1928
p. 114, 144
Photoplay
Jun 1929
p. 45
Picture Play
May 1928
p. 71
Screenland
May 1928
p. 75
Screenland
Jul 1928
p. 67
Variety
21 Mar 1928
p. 6
Variety
27 Jun 1928
p. 34, 44
DETAILS
Release Date:
13 May 1928
Premiere Information:
New York opening: week of 23 Jun 1928
Production Date:
began 27 Dec 1927
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
First National Pictures, Inc.
19 April 1928
LP25165
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
60
Length(in feet):
6,021
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

During World War I, German-American Harry Van Housen desperately wants to enlist in the U. S. Army to prove to his sweetheart that he is a loyal American. However, whenever Harry volunteers for service, he is turned down for being either underweight, too short, nearsighted, flat-footed, or for having dandruff. Harry unwittingly comes upon a German base used to shuttle supplies to submarines off the U.S. coast. He also inadvertently frees an American officer, destroys the base, and captures a gang of spies. Harry is given a hero's welcome by his hometown, but he ignores the event to be with his ...

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During World War I, German-American Harry Van Housen desperately wants to enlist in the U. S. Army to prove to his sweetheart that he is a loyal American. However, whenever Harry volunteers for service, he is turned down for being either underweight, too short, nearsighted, flat-footed, or for having dandruff. Harry unwittingly comes upon a German base used to shuttle supplies to submarines off the U.S. coast. He also inadvertently frees an American officer, destroys the base, and captures a gang of spies. Harry is given a hero's welcome by his hometown, but he ignores the event to be with his girl.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.