Piccadilly Jim (1919)

Comedy | December 1919

Full page view
HISTORY

Although no confirmed release date has been found, evidence indicates that the film was released in 1919. Wodehouse's novel was published in serial form by The Saturday Evening Post. Scenes from the film were shot on the streets and in the subways of New York City. The name of the actor playing Peter Pett is spelled William Daze in all contemporary reviews. M-G-M remade Wodehouse's novel in 1936 with Robert Montgomery starring and Robert Z. Leonard directing. ...

More Less

Although no confirmed release date has been found, evidence indicates that the film was released in 1919. Wodehouse's novel was published in serial form by The Saturday Evening Post. Scenes from the film were shot on the streets and in the subways of New York City. The name of the actor playing Peter Pett is spelled William Daze in all contemporary reviews. M-G-M remade Wodehouse's novel in 1936 with Robert Montgomery starring and Robert Z. Leonard directing.

Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
ETR
6 Sep 1919
p. 1122 (ad insert)
ETR
13 Jan 1920
p. 615
MPN
10 Jan 1920
p. 611
MPN
24 Nov 1917
p. 19
MPW
10 Jan 1920
p. 187
MPW
17 Jan 1920
pp. 464-65
Variety
6 Feb 1920
p. 53
Wid's
8 Feb 1920
p. 8
DETAILS
Release Date:
December 1919
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Selznick Pictures Corp.
4 December 1919
LP14521
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

American newspaper reporter Jim Crocker's madcap escapades in London earn him notoriety and the nickname "Piccadilly Jim." When he overhears his American cousin by marriage, Ann Chester, giving her candid opinion of him, he decides to return to America to try to reform. He meets Ann on the boat, using another name. Unable to find work in New York, he goes to his stepaunt Mrs. Peter Pett's home to be near Ann. Jim then helps Ann kidnap pampered cousin Ogden Pett whose overindulgence has created disruption in the household. The plans fail, despite Ogden's consent to the kidnapping in return for half the ransom money, but Jim succeeds in winning Ann's ...

More Less

American newspaper reporter Jim Crocker's madcap escapades in London earn him notoriety and the nickname "Piccadilly Jim." When he overhears his American cousin by marriage, Ann Chester, giving her candid opinion of him, he decides to return to America to try to reform. He meets Ann on the boat, using another name. Unable to find work in New York, he goes to his stepaunt Mrs. Peter Pett's home to be near Ann. Jim then helps Ann kidnap pampered cousin Ogden Pett whose overindulgence has created disruption in the household. The plans fail, despite Ogden's consent to the kidnapping in return for half the ransom money, but Jim succeeds in winning Ann's affections.

Less

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

Daisy Kenyon

According to a Jul 1945 HR news item, Twentieth Century-Fox purchased the rights to Elizabeth Janeway's novel for $100,000, intending to star Gene Tierney in the title ... >>

Westward the Women

The film's pre-release title was Pioneer Women . The opening credits list Robert Taylor and Denise Darcel first, with several other cast members listed after them. ... >>

Stagecoach

The American folk songs adapted for the score included the traditional ballads "Lily Dale," "Rosa Lee," "Joe Bowers," "Joe the Wrangler," "She's More to Be Pitied Than Censured," "She ... >>

Watermelon Man

The film was originally titled The Night the Sun Came Out on Happy Hollow Lane, which was later shortened to The Night the Sun Came Out. ... >>

Out of the Past

The working title of this film was Build My Gallows High . In Sep 1945, RKO outbid Warner Bros. for the rights to Geoffrey Homes's as yet unpublished ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.