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HISTORY

Some sources and reviews refer to the film as The Regeneration. Owen Kildare, known as "The Kipling of the Bowery," based his book on his own experiences. Some scenes in the film were shot in New York's Chinatown, the Bowery and the East Side tenements. The burning of the excursion barge was shot on the Hudson River near Nyack.
       The film was re-released on 12 Jan 1919.
       This was Raoul Walsh's first full-length feature, and considered one of the early gangster films.
       Another film based on Kildare's story was the 1924 Universal production, Fools Highway, directed by Irving Cummings and starring Mary Philbin and Pat O'Malley (see entry). It had a working title of Mamie Rose early in production, and unlike the book or this film, Fools Highway had a happy ending. ...

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Some sources and reviews refer to the film as The Regeneration. Owen Kildare, known as "The Kipling of the Bowery," based his book on his own experiences. Some scenes in the film were shot in New York's Chinatown, the Bowery and the East Side tenements. The burning of the excursion barge was shot on the Hudson River near Nyack.
       The film was re-released on 12 Jan 1919.
       This was Raoul Walsh's first full-length feature, and considered one of the early gangster films.
       Another film based on Kildare's story was the 1924 Universal production, Fools Highway, directed by Irving Cummings and starring Mary Philbin and Pat O'Malley (see entry). It had a working title of Mamie Rose early in production, and unlike the book or this film, Fools Highway had a happy ending.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Motion Picture News
10 Jul 1915
p. 54
Motion Picture News
7 Aug 1915
p. 46
Motion Picture News
9 Oct 1915
p. 38, 67
Motion Picture News
21 Aug 1915
p. 63
Motion Picture News
28 Aug 1915
p. 42
Motion Picture News
18 Sep 1915
p. 55
Motion Picture News
2 Oct 1915
p. 83
Motography
9 Oct 1915
p. 767
Moving Picture World
2 Oct 1915
p. 94
Moving Picture World
18 Jan 1919
p. 390
Variety
24 Sep 1915
p. 21
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
R. A. Walsh
Dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
R. A. Walsh
Adpt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the book My Mamie Rose; The Story of My Regeneration by Owen Kildare (New York, 1903) and the play The Regeneration by Owen Kildare and Walter Hackett (New York, 1 Sep 1908).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Regeneration
Release Date:
13 September 1915
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
William Fox
20 September 1915
LP6444
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

After Owen Conway's mother dies, the ten-year-old is taken in by his tenement neighbors, but when the intoxicated husband beats him, Owen runs away. Later, Owen works chopping ice at the New York docks and defends a hunchback from assault by a street tough named Skinny. Owen leads a gang at age twenty-five. When District Attorney Ames takes socialite Marie Deering, who is anxious to see a gangster, to a café, Owen, to please Marie, saves Ames from a beating. Marie is so disturbed by the suffering she sees that she becomes a settlement worker. Marie teaches Owen to read and write, and he accompanies her on a riverboat excursion for slum dwellers, during which Skinny starts a fire. Warned by Ames that his relationship with Marie is doomed, Owen consults a priest. To return a favor, Owen hides Skinny after he stabbed a policeman, but then he attempts to rape Marie. When Owen returns, Skinny shoots at him and mistakenly kills Marie. Owen heeds her dying wish that he not take vengeance. After the hunchback shoots the fleeing Skinny, who falls to his death, the hunchback and Owen pray by Marie's ...

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After Owen Conway's mother dies, the ten-year-old is taken in by his tenement neighbors, but when the intoxicated husband beats him, Owen runs away. Later, Owen works chopping ice at the New York docks and defends a hunchback from assault by a street tough named Skinny. Owen leads a gang at age twenty-five. When District Attorney Ames takes socialite Marie Deering, who is anxious to see a gangster, to a café, Owen, to please Marie, saves Ames from a beating. Marie is so disturbed by the suffering she sees that she becomes a settlement worker. Marie teaches Owen to read and write, and he accompanies her on a riverboat excursion for slum dwellers, during which Skinny starts a fire. Warned by Ames that his relationship with Marie is doomed, Owen consults a priest. To return a favor, Owen hides Skinny after he stabbed a policeman, but then he attempts to rape Marie. When Owen returns, Skinny shoots at him and mistakenly kills Marie. Owen heeds her dying wish that he not take vengeance. After the hunchback shoots the fleeing Skinny, who falls to his death, the hunchback and Owen pray by Marie's grave.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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