How Molly Malone Made Good (1915)

Melodrama | November 1915

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HISTORY

This film was also reviewed under the title How Molly Made Good . This was the first film released by Kulee Features. Burns Mantle, the scenarist, was at the time the dramatic critic for the New York Evening Mail . The film had its premiere on 1 Nov 1915 at the Metropolitan Opera House in Philadelphia. This was Marguerite Gale's first film. Madame Fjorde was a singer with the Royal Opera of Berlin. Some scenes in the film involving the famous stage stars who played themselves were shot at their summer houses in the following places: Mt. Vernon, NY, Sheepshead Bay, NY, Westchester County, NY, Bayside, Long Island, Harmon-on-the Hudson, NY, Edgecliff, NJ, Asbury Park, NJ, Sag Harbor, Long Island, Stamford, CT, and Wilton, CT. According to the scenario in the copyright descriptions, George M. Cohan was to be the final star interviewed, and Mrs. Kugel, the wife of Lee Kugel, owner of Kulee Features, was to play Henry Kolker's maid. Charles J. Ross and Mabel Fenton were married. The families and pets of some of the stage stars also appeared in the ... More Less

This film was also reviewed under the title How Molly Made Good . This was the first film released by Kulee Features. Burns Mantle, the scenarist, was at the time the dramatic critic for the New York Evening Mail . The film had its premiere on 1 Nov 1915 at the Metropolitan Opera House in Philadelphia. This was Marguerite Gale's first film. Madame Fjorde was a singer with the Royal Opera of Berlin. Some scenes in the film involving the famous stage stars who played themselves were shot at their summer houses in the following places: Mt. Vernon, NY, Sheepshead Bay, NY, Westchester County, NY, Bayside, Long Island, Harmon-on-the Hudson, NY, Edgecliff, NJ, Asbury Park, NJ, Sag Harbor, Long Island, Stamford, CT, and Wilton, CT. According to the scenario in the copyright descriptions, George M. Cohan was to be the final star interviewed, and Mrs. Kugel, the wife of Lee Kugel, owner of Kulee Features, was to play Henry Kolker's maid. Charles J. Ross and Mabel Fenton were married. The families and pets of some of the stage stars also appeared in the film. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Motog
23 Oct 15
pp. 863-64, 882
Motog
13 Nov 15
p. 1000.
MPN
16 Oct 15
p. 68.
MPN
23 Oct 15
p. 46, 83
MPN
6 Nov 15
p. 117.
MPN
27 Nov 15
p. 87.
MPW
23 Oct 15
p. 626, 640, 672-73.
Variety
15 Oct 15
p. 21.
Wid's
14 Oct 1915.
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DETAILS
Alternate Title:
How Molly Made Good
Release Date:
November 1915
Copyright Claimant:
Kulee Features, Inc.
Copyright Date:
9 October 1915
Copyright Number:
LU6640
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

America-bound Molly Malone, from Ireland, strikes up an acquaintance with opera singer Madame Fjorde on the ocean liner the Adriatic . Upon landing, Molly learns that her brother, a New York Tribune reporter, went to the war two weeks earlier. After her request to work as a reporter is ridiculed, she hears Hilton, a woman reporter, refuse an interview assignment by claiming that Madame Fjorde was not on the Adriatic . When Molly proves her abilities by getting the reclusive singer's interview, the impressed editor sends her to interview ten stage stars in their country homes in only three days for the Sunday magazine section. First, she is to interview Lulu Glaser, from her get the next star's address and continue on to all ten. Although Hilton and Reedy, a discharged photographer, try to stop Molly by, among other things, stealing her interview cards and causing car and train wrecks, Molly travels throughout suburban New York and succeeds. From her last interview, she hires an airplane to reach the office by the deadline. Reedy and Hilton are arrested, and Molly falls in love with a helpful ... +


America-bound Molly Malone, from Ireland, strikes up an acquaintance with opera singer Madame Fjorde on the ocean liner the Adriatic . Upon landing, Molly learns that her brother, a New York Tribune reporter, went to the war two weeks earlier. After her request to work as a reporter is ridiculed, she hears Hilton, a woman reporter, refuse an interview assignment by claiming that Madame Fjorde was not on the Adriatic . When Molly proves her abilities by getting the reclusive singer's interview, the impressed editor sends her to interview ten stage stars in their country homes in only three days for the Sunday magazine section. First, she is to interview Lulu Glaser, from her get the next star's address and continue on to all ten. Although Hilton and Reedy, a discharged photographer, try to stop Molly by, among other things, stealing her interview cards and causing car and train wrecks, Molly travels throughout suburban New York and succeeds. From her last interview, she hires an airplane to reach the office by the deadline. Reedy and Hilton are arrested, and Molly falls in love with a helpful reporter. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.