The Undertaker and His Pals (1966)

60 mins | Horror | 1966

Director:

T. L. P. Swicegood

Producer:

Alexander Grattan

Cinematographer:

Andrew Janczak

Production Designer:

Mike McCloskey

Production Company:

Eola Productions
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HISTORY

Principal photography began 13 Sep 1965, according to a 24 Sep 1965 DV production chart. The 14 Sep 1965 issue noted that filming took place at Alpha Omega Studios in Glendale, CA. A review in the 18 Oct 1967 Var predicted that the derivative horror-comedy would disgust some viewers while delighting others. The Los Angeles, CA, area was identified as the location for exterior scenes.
       That same edition reported that a print of the film had been confiscated by police on 28 Sep 1967 from the Preston Drive-In theater in Louisville, KY. Authorities defended the action, citing a local statute that prohibited “the publication of materials dealing with bloodshed, lust or crime.” The print was later returned to the theater after the Louisville Quarterly Court determined the statute to be unconstitutional. Another theater in Clarksville, IN, cancelled screenings in response to complaints from the city’s Parent-Teacher Association (PTA) and various women’s groups.
       The picture continued in release for the next five years, as indicated by box office reports in the 12 Feb 1969 and 25 Oct 1972 issues of Var. =
       Some sources credit David C. Graham as producer-director and T. L. P. Swicegood as ... More Less

Principal photography began 13 Sep 1965, according to a 24 Sep 1965 DV production chart. The 14 Sep 1965 issue noted that filming took place at Alpha Omega Studios in Glendale, CA. A review in the 18 Oct 1967 Var predicted that the derivative horror-comedy would disgust some viewers while delighting others. The Los Angeles, CA, area was identified as the location for exterior scenes.
       That same edition reported that a print of the film had been confiscated by police on 28 Sep 1967 from the Preston Drive-In theater in Louisville, KY. Authorities defended the action, citing a local statute that prohibited “the publication of materials dealing with bloodshed, lust or crime.” The print was later returned to the theater after the Louisville Quarterly Court determined the statute to be unconstitutional. Another theater in Clarksville, IN, cancelled screenings in response to complaints from the city’s Parent-Teacher Association (PTA) and various women’s groups.
       The picture continued in release for the next five years, as indicated by box office reports in the 12 Feb 1969 and 25 Oct 1972 issues of Var. =
       Some sources credit David C. Graham as producer-director and T. L. P. Swicegood as screenwriter. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
14 Sep 1965
p. 2.
Daily Variety
24 Sep 1965
p. 12.
Variety
18 Oct 1967
p. 3, 6.
Variety
12 Feb 1969
p. 12.
Variety
25 Oct 1972
p. 20.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCERS
Exec prod (see note)
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
MUSIC
SOUND
DETAILS
Release Date:
1966
Premiere Information:
Birmingham, Alabama, opening: 30 November 1966
Production Date:
began 13 September 1965
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Eastman Color
Duration(in mins):
60
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

During a slack period, an undertaker and his two hoodlum friends go out on their motorcycles to drum up business. Selecting their victims at random from the telephone directory, they commit brutal murders and then provide the bereaved families with cheap, showy funerals at outrageous prices. A sign outside the funeral parlor advertises trading stamps. Prior to the funeral, one of the hoodlums, a medical school dropout, chops up a body in order to continue his medical studies. A detective whose two secretaries have come under the psychopaths' knife becomes involved in the pursuit of the killers and is himself killed by a bomb the undertaker has set for him, but the police intervene and save two other women from ... +


During a slack period, an undertaker and his two hoodlum friends go out on their motorcycles to drum up business. Selecting their victims at random from the telephone directory, they commit brutal murders and then provide the bereaved families with cheap, showy funerals at outrageous prices. A sign outside the funeral parlor advertises trading stamps. Prior to the funeral, one of the hoodlums, a medical school dropout, chops up a body in order to continue his medical studies. A detective whose two secretaries have come under the psychopaths' knife becomes involved in the pursuit of the killers and is himself killed by a bomb the undertaker has set for him, but the police intervene and save two other women from death. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.