Arms and the Woman (1916)

Drama | 27 November 1916

Full page view
HISTORY

Astra Film was a recent New York company that first made serials for Pathe, including The Perils of Pauline (with Pearl White) and The Iron Claw. The 7 October 1916 Motion Picture News reported that Astra "has at its disposal the financial resources of Pathe and the facilities of the Pathe Jersey City studios," as well as a slate of directors, and that the company had begun to make feature films for Pathe's weekly Gold Rooster program.
       The 17 Jun 1916 Motography announced the completion of principal photography. According to the 2 Dec 1916 issue, the picture was released on 27 Nov 1916. The film marked actress Mary Nash’s debut feature for the Pathé Exchange, Inc., as noted in the 18 Nov 1916 Moving Picture World. Reviews were generally positive. According to some reviews, this film included material from news weeklies. Some modern sources identify Anton Grot as art director and include Edward G. Robinson in the cast.
       The similarly-titled Arms and the Girl (1917, see entry), starring Billie Burke, was released the following year. The picture was incorrectly labeled Arms and the Woman in the Dec 1917 Motion Picture. ...

More Less

Astra Film was a recent New York company that first made serials for Pathe, including The Perils of Pauline (with Pearl White) and The Iron Claw. The 7 October 1916 Motion Picture News reported that Astra "has at its disposal the financial resources of Pathe and the facilities of the Pathe Jersey City studios," as well as a slate of directors, and that the company had begun to make feature films for Pathe's weekly Gold Rooster program.
       The 17 Jun 1916 Motography announced the completion of principal photography. According to the 2 Dec 1916 issue, the picture was released on 27 Nov 1916. The film marked actress Mary Nash’s debut feature for the Pathé Exchange, Inc., as noted in the 18 Nov 1916 Moving Picture World. Reviews were generally positive. According to some reviews, this film included material from news weeklies. Some modern sources identify Anton Grot as art director and include Edward G. Robinson in the cast.
       The similarly-titled Arms and the Girl (1917, see entry), starring Billie Burke, was released the following year. The picture was incorrectly labeled Arms and the Woman in the Dec 1917 Motion Picture.

Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Motion Picture
Dec 1917
---
Motion Picture News
7 Oct 1916
p. 2175
Motion Picture News
25 Nov 1916
p. 3329
Motion Picture News
2 Dec 1916
p. 3474
Motography
17 Jun 1916
p. 1380
Motography
2 Dec 1916
p. 1258
Moving Picture World
18 Nov 1916
p. 1035
Moving Picture World
25 Nov 1916
ad following p. 1102, p. 1181, 1230
NYDM
18 Nov 1916
p. 26
Variety
10 Nov 1916
p. 29
Wid's
16 Nov 1916
p. 1107
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
BRAND NAME
Gold Rooster Plays
Gold Rooster Plays
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
DETAILS
Release Date:
27 November 1916
Production Date:
ended Jun 1916
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Pathé Exchange, Inc.
17 July 1916
LU8717
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Rozika, a Hungarian girl with a beautiful voice, emigrates to America with her ne'er-do-well brother Carl. After she gets a job singing in a saloon in New York's Lower East Side, Rozika's street singing attracts David Trevor, the owner of a large steel works that manufactures munitions. Trevor pays for Rozika's lessons with a master, and after she becomes a famous opera singer, she marries him. When World War I breaks out in Europe, Rozika, realizing that Trevor's munitions will be used against her homeland, pleads with him to refuse the allies' orders, but he ignores her. Meanwhile, Carl, who returned to Hungary after killing a man in a brawl, is sent by an anarchist group to blow up Trevor's plant. Rozika learns of Carl's plans and locks him in a closet, but he breaks through and shoots Trevor. After chases, gunfights and killings, German spies explode the factory. The wounded and financially ruined Trevor, realizing that his marital conflict is now over, says of his factory's destruction, "It is better ...

More Less

Rozika, a Hungarian girl with a beautiful voice, emigrates to America with her ne'er-do-well brother Carl. After she gets a job singing in a saloon in New York's Lower East Side, Rozika's street singing attracts David Trevor, the owner of a large steel works that manufactures munitions. Trevor pays for Rozika's lessons with a master, and after she becomes a famous opera singer, she marries him. When World War I breaks out in Europe, Rozika, realizing that Trevor's munitions will be used against her homeland, pleads with him to refuse the allies' orders, but he ignores her. Meanwhile, Carl, who returned to Hungary after killing a man in a brawl, is sent by an anarchist group to blow up Trevor's plant. Rozika learns of Carl's plans and locks him in a closet, but he breaks through and shoots Trevor. After chases, gunfights and killings, German spies explode the factory. The wounded and financially ruined Trevor, realizing that his marital conflict is now over, says of his factory's destruction, "It is better so."

Less

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

Casablanca

In the onscreen credits, actor S. Z. Sakall's name is incorrectly spelled "S. K. Sakall." HR news items add the following information about the production: Warner ... >>

What Happened on Twenty-Third Street, New York City

The Edison catalog summarized this film as follows: "A winner and sure to please. In front of one of the largest newspaper offices is a hot air shaft through ... >>

Another Job for the Undertaker

The Edison catalog summarized this film as follows: “Shows a bedroom in a hotel. On the wall of the room is a conspicuous sign 'Don't blow out the gas.' ... >>

Sunset Blvd.

The film's working title was A Can of Beans. Although most contemporary and modern sources refer to the film as Sunset Boulevard, the opening title ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.