Dear Heart (1964)

114 mins | Comedy-drama | 3 December 1964

Director:

Delbert Mann

Writer:

Tad Mosel

Producer:

Martin Manulis

Cinematographer:

Russell Harlan

Production Designer:

Joseph C. Wright

Production Company:

Out-of-Towners Co.
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HISTORY

Referring to the film as The Out-of-Towners, the 15 Apr 1962 NYT announced that producer Martin Manulis, writer Tad Mosel, and director Delbert Mann were collaborating on the forthcoming original drama. Production was not set to begin until the following spring, in Hollywood, CA. According to the 28 Oct 1963 NYT, the story was based on Mosel's 1957 television presentation of the same name, which aired on "Studio One," a dramatic anthology series that ran on Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS) from 1948-1958. The adaptation marked Mosel's first theatrical screenplay.
       The 23 Apr 1962 DV reported that Manulis-Mann Productions had been formed to complete the independent picture, although the onscreen producing company credit was listed as Out-of-Towners Co.
       On 27 Jul 1962, DV announced that Deborah Kerr was signed to star, and Robert Mulligan was named as director, but neither remained with the project. At that time, locations were set for Hollywood and New York City. On 23 Aug 1962, DV noted a Jan 1963 start date. However, production was delayed, and the 5 Mar 1963 issue indicated that Glenn Ford was in talks to star. Anne Bancroft and Geraldine Page were in consideration to co-star. Page ultimately won the role.
       The 12 Dec 1962 DV stated that Manulis would soon join Four Star Television as head of their newly formed theatrical production department. The Out-of-Towners was set to be one of their first releases. On 20 May 1963, DV reported that the independent film would be released by Warner Bros. Pictures. An Oct 1963 start date was anticipated, and Delbert ...

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Referring to the film as The Out-of-Towners, the 15 Apr 1962 NYT announced that producer Martin Manulis, writer Tad Mosel, and director Delbert Mann were collaborating on the forthcoming original drama. Production was not set to begin until the following spring, in Hollywood, CA. According to the 28 Oct 1963 NYT, the story was based on Mosel's 1957 television presentation of the same name, which aired on "Studio One," a dramatic anthology series that ran on Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS) from 1948-1958. The adaptation marked Mosel's first theatrical screenplay.
       The 23 Apr 1962 DV reported that Manulis-Mann Productions had been formed to complete the independent picture, although the onscreen producing company credit was listed as Out-of-Towners Co.
       On 27 Jul 1962, DV announced that Deborah Kerr was signed to star, and Robert Mulligan was named as director, but neither remained with the project. At that time, locations were set for Hollywood and New York City. On 23 Aug 1962, DV noted a Jan 1963 start date. However, production was delayed, and the 5 Mar 1963 issue indicated that Glenn Ford was in talks to star. Anne Bancroft and Geraldine Page were in consideration to co-star. Page ultimately won the role.
       The 12 Dec 1962 DV stated that Manulis would soon join Four Star Television as head of their newly formed theatrical production department. The Out-of-Towners was set to be one of their first releases. On 20 May 1963, DV reported that the independent film would be released by Warner Bros. Pictures. An Oct 1963 start date was anticipated, and Delbert Mann was attached to direct.
       The 10 Sep 1963 DV announced that filming was set to begin on location at Grand Central Terminal in New York City on 30 Sep 1963, before the production returned to the Paramount-Sunset Studios in Hollywood, due to overflow at the Warner Bros. Studios in Burbank, CA. However, the 20 Sep 1963 issue stated that principal photography would begin on 2 Oct 1963 at New York City's Penn station, where production would continue for one week before relocating to Hollywood. The 7 Oct 1963 DV confirmed that the crew had returned to CA.
       The 16 Aug 1963 DV named Michael Lindsay-Hogg as Manulis's assistant. Various items published in Oct 1963 and Nov 1963 issues of DV added Ralph Manza, Peter Ford, Allyson Ames, and Ronnie Knox to the cast.
       On 15 Apr 1964, Var noted that production had been completed, and indicated that the picture was produced by Four Star Television in association with Martin Manulis Productions and Biography Productions, with Warner Bros. attached as financiers.
       The 20 Aug 1964 DV announced the title change to The Big Weekend. Three weeks later, the 11 Sep 1964 issue reported that the title had been changed again, to Dear Heart, after Jack L. Warner heard the original song of the same name, written for the film by Henry Mancini, Jay Livingston, and Ray Evans.
       The 30 Nov 1964 LAT listed 3 Dec 1964 as the Los Angeles opening date at the Hollywood Paramount Theatre, where the film was scheduled to run for three weeks for Academy Award consideration before its national release. The 17 Dec 1964 NYT announced that the official premiere would be held in Mar 1965 at New York City's Radio City Music Hall. The 1 Mar 1965 DV confirmed a 6 Mar 1965 premiere date, and reported that the Music Hall was undergoing a five-day renovation to prepare for the event, noting that both the closing and the theater's collaboration with a major motion picture company for a film premiere were rare occurrences.
       Film reviews were mostly negative. The 2 Dec 1964 DV praised Mann's direction, but complained that the story was "lackluster." The 8 Mar 1965 NYT similarly deemed the picture "stale, dull and humorless."

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
PERSONAL & COMPANY INDEX CREDITS
HISTORY CREDITS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
23 Apr 1962
p. 4
Daily Variety
27 Jul 1962
p. 1
Daily Variety
23 Aug 1962
p. 1
Daily Variety
12 Dec 1962
p. 1, 4
Daily Variety
5 Mar 1963
p. 8
Daily Variety
20 May 1963
p. 1
Daily Variety
16 Aug 1963
p. 4
Daily Variety
10 Sep 1963
p. 7
Daily Variety
13 Sep 1963
p. 6
Daily Variety
20 Sep 1963
p. 7
Daily Variety
7 Oct 1963
p. 2
Daily Variety
16 Oct 1963
p. 7
Daily Variety
30 Oct 1963
p. 3
Daily Variety
1 Nov 1963
p. 6
Daily Variety
5 Nov 1963
p. 4
Daily Variety
20 Aug 1964
p. 7
Daily Variety
11 Sep 1964
p. 3
Daily Variety
2 Dec 1964
p. 3
Daily Variety
1 Mar 1965
p. 11
Los Angeles Times
30 Nov 1964
Section C, p. 20
Los Angeles Times
4 Dec 1964
Section E, p. 7
New York Times
15 Apr 1962
Section X, p. 9
New York Times
28 Oct 1963
p. 23
New York Times
8 Dec 1963
p. 183
New York Times
17 Dec 1964
p. 48
New York Times
2 Mar 1965
p. 31
New York Times
8 Mar 1965
p. 33
Variety
15 Apr 1964
p. 31, 43
Variety
22 Jul 1964
p. 91
Variety
6 Jan 1965
p. 29, 32
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Martin Manulis Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
PRODUCER
WRITER
Story & scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Joseph Wright
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Folmar Blangsted
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost des
MUSIC
SOUND
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
Supv hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Scr supv
Dial supv
SOURCES
SONGS
"Dear Heart," music by Henry Mancini, lyrics by Jay Livingston and Ray Evans.
SONGWRITER/COMPOSER
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
The Big Weekend
The Out-of-Towners
Release Date:
3 December 1964
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 3 Dec 1964; New York City opening: 6 Mar 1965
Production Date:
began 2 Oct 1963
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Out-of-Towners Co.
27 March 1965
LP32382
Duration(in mins):
114
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Evie Jackson, a smalltown postmistress whose compulsive friendliness causes men to avoid her, arrives in New York City to attend a postmasters' convention and meets Harry Mork, a recently promoted greeting card salesman staying at the same hotel. Harry, who is engaged to Phyllis, a widow from Altoona, Pennsylvania, looks forward to settling down after years on the road. Like other men, he is wary of Evie, but after an unhappy rendezvous with June, a magazine salesgirl, he accepts Evie's invitation to a party. He enjoys her company, and she begins to fall in love with him. Evie learns of Harry's forthcoming wedding when he takes her to see the apartment he has rented for himself and his wife, and she decides to return home. Phyllis arrives in New York and visits the apartment with Harry. They find Phyllis's teenaged son, Patrick, living there with his beatnik girl friend, Zola, and learn that the boy plans to stay. Phyllis announces that she prefers to live in hotels because she is tired of housekeeping, and it becomes apparent that she plans to marry Harry to unburden herself of responsibilities and chiefly of the problems involved in raising a son. Harry leaves her and rushes to Pennsylvania Station in time to prevent Evie's ...

More Less

Evie Jackson, a smalltown postmistress whose compulsive friendliness causes men to avoid her, arrives in New York City to attend a postmasters' convention and meets Harry Mork, a recently promoted greeting card salesman staying at the same hotel. Harry, who is engaged to Phyllis, a widow from Altoona, Pennsylvania, looks forward to settling down after years on the road. Like other men, he is wary of Evie, but after an unhappy rendezvous with June, a magazine salesgirl, he accepts Evie's invitation to a party. He enjoys her company, and she begins to fall in love with him. Evie learns of Harry's forthcoming wedding when he takes her to see the apartment he has rented for himself and his wife, and she decides to return home. Phyllis arrives in New York and visits the apartment with Harry. They find Phyllis's teenaged son, Patrick, living there with his beatnik girl friend, Zola, and learn that the boy plans to stay. Phyllis announces that she prefers to live in hotels because she is tired of housekeeping, and it becomes apparent that she plans to marry Harry to unburden herself of responsibilities and chiefly of the problems involved in raising a son. Harry leaves her and rushes to Pennsylvania Station in time to prevent Evie's departure.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.