The Glass Bottom Boat (1966)

110 mins | Comedy | 1966

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HISTORY

While being interviewed for the 14 Feb 1965 NYT, producer Martin Melcher announced the next film starring his wife, actress-singer Doris Day, as The Girl in the Glass Bottom Boat, for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Inc. (MGM). On 13 Apr 1965, LAT referred to the picture by its official title, The Glass Bottom Boat, noting that it would mark the screen debut of television actress Kathleen Nolan. Other casting notices include singer Jack Jones (9 Jun 1965 LAT), Maroum Hakim (17 Sep 1965 LAT), Mel Ericksen (24 Sep 1965 DV), restaurateur and reputed Russian aristocrat Mike Romanoff (25 Sep 1965 LAT), Ellen Atterbury (9 Oct 1965 LAT), Tony Regan, Shep Houghton , and Ray Lee (27 Sep 1965 DV), and the Pat Brady Trio (27 Feb 1966 LAT). The Glass Bottom Boat also marked the feature film debuts of comedian Dom De Luise and broadcast personality Arthur Godfrey, and the final film for character actress Alice Pearce, who died of cancer on 4 Mar 1966. Pearce and actor George Tobias played a married couple modeled on their characters, “Mr. and Mrs. Kravitz,” from the television series, Bewitched (ABC, 1964 – 1972). Actor Robert Vaughn made a brief appearance as secret agent “Napoleon Solo,” from his television series, The Man from U.N.C.L.E. (NBC, 1964 – 1968). The 24 Dec 1965 DV noted that the belch uttered in the film by “a futuristic floor-cleaner” was recorded years earlier by the late actor, Wallace Beery.
       According to the 6 ... More Less

While being interviewed for the 14 Feb 1965 NYT, producer Martin Melcher announced the next film starring his wife, actress-singer Doris Day, as The Girl in the Glass Bottom Boat, for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Inc. (MGM). On 13 Apr 1965, LAT referred to the picture by its official title, The Glass Bottom Boat, noting that it would mark the screen debut of television actress Kathleen Nolan. Other casting notices include singer Jack Jones (9 Jun 1965 LAT), Maroum Hakim (17 Sep 1965 LAT), Mel Ericksen (24 Sep 1965 DV), restaurateur and reputed Russian aristocrat Mike Romanoff (25 Sep 1965 LAT), Ellen Atterbury (9 Oct 1965 LAT), Tony Regan, Shep Houghton , and Ray Lee (27 Sep 1965 DV), and the Pat Brady Trio (27 Feb 1966 LAT). The Glass Bottom Boat also marked the feature film debuts of comedian Dom De Luise and broadcast personality Arthur Godfrey, and the final film for character actress Alice Pearce, who died of cancer on 4 Mar 1966. Pearce and actor George Tobias played a married couple modeled on their characters, “Mr. and Mrs. Kravitz,” from the television series, Bewitched (ABC, 1964 – 1972). Actor Robert Vaughn made a brief appearance as secret agent “Napoleon Solo,” from his television series, The Man from U.N.C.L.E. (NBC, 1964 – 1968). The 24 Dec 1965 DV noted that the belch uttered in the film by “a futuristic floor-cleaner” was recorded years earlier by the late actor, Wallace Beery.
       According to the 6 Oct 1965 DV, Arthur Godfrey credited Warner Bros. president Jack L. Warner with convincing him to accept the role. Godfrey claimed to be uncomfortable playing Doris Day’s father, as his attraction to her would be apparent to audiences. Principal photography began 3 Aug 1965, as reported in the 3 Sep 1965 LAT. Godfrey took a brief hiatus to attend a horse show in Dayton, OH.
       The 6 Oct 1965 DV reported that comedian Dick Martin was commuting between Los Angeles, CA, and Lake Tahoe, NV, to fulfill his obligations to both the picture and to Harveys hotel, where he was currently performing with his stage partner, Dan Rowan.
       The 8 Oct 1965 DV noted that the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) loaned its Apollo spacecraft to the production. The craft’s two-hour visit required a $200,000 insurance policy from MGM.
       An item in the 13 Oct 1965 DV stated that Doris Day performed her “Mata Hari” dance routine on a closed set with minimal crewmembers and three studio guards. The 26 Jul 1965 LAT credited dancer Frank “Killer Joe” Piro as her instructor. The 27 Oct 1965 DV reported Day’s “mermaid-like plunge” into MGM’s “Saucer Tank,” which was last used by actress Esther Williams in Jupiter’s Darling (1955, see entry). According to the 20 Jun 1966 LAT, actor Paul Lynde was required to wear an evening gown for his role as security guard “Homer Cripps.” When Lynde assumed the gown was intended for Doris Day, she insisted she would never wear anything “that feminine.”
       The 29 Oct 1965 DV announced the end of principal photography, followed by a party for the cast and crew, held 28 Oct 1965. Although he was unable to attend, Arthur Godfrey sent a six-foot-long “hero” sandwich from New York City at a cost of $168.00. Also in the package were orchids for the women, and a poem, which Doris Day read to the partygoers.
       On 13 Jan 1966, DV reported that MGM president Robert O’Brien “ordered a big exploitation campaign” after screening the film. Two weeks later, composer Frank DeVol, credited only as “DeVol,” began recording the score with a forty-seven piece orchestra, as stated in the 26 Jan 1966 DV.
       The Glass Bottom Boat opened 9 Jun 1966 at Radio City Music Hall in New York City, 17 Aug 1966 in Los Angeles, and in nearly 300 other cities throughout the summer. Reviews were mixed, although several critics agreed that comedians Paul Lynde, Dom De Luise, John McGiver, and Edward Andrews were among the film’s greatest assets. According to an advertisement in the 3 Aug 1966 DV, audience response was generally positive, earning the picture nearly $250,000 in nine cities during its opening weeks.
       As reported in the 12 Feb 1967 LAT, the picture was the first to be screened by American Airlines, using the Bell & Howell Astrocolor system. It was also the third production in which Doris Day sang her signature song, “Que Sera, Sera.” A brief in the 5 Aug 1966 DV noted that the film was titled The Spy in Lace Panties for its Singapore release.
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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
24 Sep 1965
p. 16.
Daily Variety
27 Sep 1965
p. 2, 4.
Daily Variety
6 Oct 1965
p. 3.
Daily Variety
8 Oct 1965
p. 2.
Daily Variety
13 Oct 1965
p. 2.
Daily Variety
26 Oct 1965
p. 11.
Daily Variety
27 Oct 1965
p. 2.
Daily Variety
29 Oct 1965
p. 2.
Daily Variety
24 Dec 1965
p. 1.
Daily Variety
13 Jan 1966
p. 2.
Daily Variety
26 Jan 1966
p. 10.
Daily Variety
20 Apr 1966
p. 3.
Daily Variety
26 May 1966
p. 39.
Daily Variety
3 Aug 1966
p. 12.
Daily Variety
5 Aug 1966
p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
13 Apr 1965
Section C, p. 16.
Los Angeles Times
9 Jun 1965
Section D, p. 14.
Los Angeles Times
23 Jun 1965
Section D, p. 11.
Los Angeles Times
26 Jul 1965
Section C, p. 19.
Los Angeles Times
3 Sep 1965
Section D, p. 9.
Los Angeles Times
17 Sep 1965
Section D, p. 11.
Los Angeles Times
25 Sep 1965
Section B, p. 9.
Los Angeles Times
8 Oct 1965
Section D, p. 13.
Los Angeles Times
9 Oct 1965
Section A, p. 9.
Los Angeles Times
25 Oct 1965
Section C, p. 18.
Los Angeles Times
1 Nov 1965
Section C, p. 16.
Los Angeles Times
27 Feb 1966
Section B, p. 13.
Los Angeles Times
20 Jun 1966
Section C, p. 24.
Los Angeles Times
17 Aug 1966
Section D, p. 12.
Los Angeles Times
12 Feb 1967
Section E, p. 13.
New York Times
14 Feb 1965
Section X, p. 7.
New York Times
4 Mar 1966
p. 33.
New York Times
10 Jun 1966
p. 53.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Miss Day's cost des
MUSIC
Mus
SOUND
Rec supv
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec visual eff
Spec visual eff
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
Makeup
Miss Day's hairstyling
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit prod mgr
SOURCES
SONGS
"The Glass Bottom Boat," words and music by Joe Lubin, sung by Doris Day and Arthur Godfrey
"Soft as the Starlight," words and music by Joe Lubin and Jerome Howard
"Que Sera, Sera," words by Ray Evans, music by Jay Livingston, sung by Doris Day.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Girl in the Glass Bottom Boat
Release Date:
1966
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 9 June 1966
Los Angeles opening: 17 August 1966
Production Date:
3 August--late October 1965
Copyright Claimant:
Arwin Productions
Copyright Date:
4 March 1966
Copyright Number:
LP32330
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex
Color
Metrocolor
Widescreen/ratio
Panavision
Duration(in mins):
110
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Jennifer Nelson, a young widow working in the public relations office of a space laboratory, meets her new boss Bruce Templeton when he accidentally catches his fishing line on a mermaid outfit she is wearing while entertaining tourists on her father's glass-bottom boat. Templeton, delighted to discover that the woman he "fished out" of Catalina Bay is working at his plant, assigns her to write a definitive biography of him while he is test-piloting a new rocket. Jenny's habit of "exercising" her dog Vladimir by telephoning him at home (he runs around the house whenever the phone rings), arouses the suspicions of CIA men. When she overhears Templeton discussing the possibility that she is a foreign spy, she makes misleading phone calls at a party at Templeton's home. Unknown to her, a secret formula has been planted in her purse, and the real espionage agent pays her a visit when she arrives home. Jenny bolts out of a window and a mad chase follows. The real culprits are apprehended, and Jenny ends up in her boss's ... +


Jennifer Nelson, a young widow working in the public relations office of a space laboratory, meets her new boss Bruce Templeton when he accidentally catches his fishing line on a mermaid outfit she is wearing while entertaining tourists on her father's glass-bottom boat. Templeton, delighted to discover that the woman he "fished out" of Catalina Bay is working at his plant, assigns her to write a definitive biography of him while he is test-piloting a new rocket. Jenny's habit of "exercising" her dog Vladimir by telephoning him at home (he runs around the house whenever the phone rings), arouses the suspicions of CIA men. When she overhears Templeton discussing the possibility that she is a foreign spy, she makes misleading phone calls at a party at Templeton's home. Unknown to her, a secret formula has been planted in her purse, and the real espionage agent pays her a visit when she arrives home. Jenny bolts out of a window and a mad chase follows. The real culprits are apprehended, and Jenny ends up in her boss's arms. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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