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HISTORY

The 8 Apr 1916 Moving Picture World reported that principal photography was underway in Hamilton, Bermuda. The film starred actress Valentine Grant in her first for Famous Players Film Co., and was directed by her husband, Sidney Olcott. The cast also included Blanche Davenport, according to the 21 Oct 1916 Motion Picture News.
       Olcott told the 6 May 1916 Motion Picture News that only he and Grant managed to avoid sea sickness during the voyages to and from Bermuda, although neither had much of an appetite during their time on the ocean. Unable to find suitable background actors to play Irish villagers, Olcott’s assistant, William Scully, suggested “posting notices in hotel lobbies” offering tourists the opportunity to appear in the film. Approximately forty responded and were said to have been grateful for the experience. Interior scenes were filmed in New York City.
       The Innocent Lie opened 8 May 1916, according to the 20 May 1916 Moving Picture World. Other scheduled release dates included 17 Apr 1916 (15 Apr 1916 Motography), 20 Apr 1916 (22 Apr 1916 Motography), and 4 May 1916 (6 May 1916 Motion Picture News). Reviews were generally positive.
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The 8 Apr 1916 Moving Picture World reported that principal photography was underway in Hamilton, Bermuda. The film starred actress Valentine Grant in her first for Famous Players Film Co., and was directed by her husband, Sidney Olcott. The cast also included Blanche Davenport, according to the 21 Oct 1916 Motion Picture News.
       Olcott told the 6 May 1916 Motion Picture News that only he and Grant managed to avoid sea sickness during the voyages to and from Bermuda, although neither had much of an appetite during their time on the ocean. Unable to find suitable background actors to play Irish villagers, Olcott’s assistant, William Scully, suggested “posting notices in hotel lobbies” offering tourists the opportunity to appear in the film. Approximately forty responded and were said to have been grateful for the experience. Interior scenes were filmed in New York City.
       The Innocent Lie opened 8 May 1916, according to the 20 May 1916 Moving Picture World. Other scheduled release dates included 17 Apr 1916 (15 Apr 1916 Motography), 20 Apr 1916 (22 Apr 1916 Motography), and 4 May 1916 (6 May 1916 Motion Picture News). Reviews were generally positive.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Motion Picture News
6 May 1916
p. 2689
Motion Picture News
20 May 1916
p. 3090
Motion Picture News
21 Oct 1916
p. 25, 95
Motography
15 Apr 1916
p. 872
Motography
22 Apr 1916
p. 950
Motography
20 May 1916
p. 1149, 1167-1168
Moving Picture World
8 Apr 1916
p. 233, 236
Moving Picture World
20 May 1916
p. 1349
New York Times
8 May 1916
p. 7
NYDM
20 May 1916
p. 25
Variety
12 May 1916
p. 19
Wid's Daily
11 May 1916
p. 567
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITERS
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
DETAILS
Release Date:
8 May 1916
Production Date:
Apr 1916
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Famous Players Film Co.
21 April 1916
LU8124
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

After Nora O'Brien comes to America from Ireland to see her brother, she suffers a concussion. She is then mistaken for another Irish Nora who had been planning to come to the United States to visit her seldom seen aunt, Mrs. Watson, but who decided, finally, to stay at home. A dazed Nora is taken to Mrs. Watson's home and treated like family, and then, when Mrs. Watson's son Jack returns from college he falls in love with his new cousin. Nora recovers from her injury and realizes that a mistake has been made, but she has been so impressed with the Watson's kindness that she does not want to confess that she is not related to them. Finally, however, the truth comes out, and because Nora already feels like a Watson, she eagerly consents to marry Jack in order to make her ties to the family completely legal and ...

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After Nora O'Brien comes to America from Ireland to see her brother, she suffers a concussion. She is then mistaken for another Irish Nora who had been planning to come to the United States to visit her seldom seen aunt, Mrs. Watson, but who decided, finally, to stay at home. A dazed Nora is taken to Mrs. Watson's home and treated like family, and then, when Mrs. Watson's son Jack returns from college he falls in love with his new cousin. Nora recovers from her injury and realizes that a mistake has been made, but she has been so impressed with the Watson's kindness that she does not want to confess that she is not related to them. Finally, however, the truth comes out, and because Nora already feels like a Watson, she eagerly consents to marry Jack in order to make her ties to the family completely legal and official.

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GENRE
Genre:


Subject
Subject (Major):

Subject (Minor):
Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.