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HISTORY

Woman Times Seven was announced in a 9 Feb 1966 NYT article as the next project for writer-director team Cesare Zavattini and Vittorio De Sica, who had just signed a three-picture deal with Embassy Pictures Corp. The project, then referred to as Woman x Seven, was slated to be the first of the three productions, all of which would be financed entirely by Embassy at budgets of $1-$3 million, in exchange for worldwide distribution rights. Although Zavattini and De Sica were both Italian, none of the pictures were expected to qualify as native Italian productions and therefore would not be eligible for subsidies from the Italian government.
       Natalie Wood and Shirley MacLaine were said to be the top two contenders for the female lead, which involved seven separate roles in the screenplay’s vignettes. MacLaine’s casting was confirmed in the 1 Jun 1966 Var. Various contemporary sources reported her salary as between $800,000 and $1 million, although the 30 Jun 1967 DV claimed that a “production source” verified she was paid “a flat $850,000, with no participations.”
       Principal photography began in Paris, France, on 10 Oct 1966, as noted in a 14 Oct 1966 DV production chart. Around that time, the 19 Oct 1966 Var stated that the film would cost an estimated $4 million. An item in the 9 Nov 1966 Var described Woman Times Seven as Embassy chief Joseph E. Levine’s “biggest self-financed film,” and noted that Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp. had acquired foreign distribution rights for an undisclosed price that may or may not have involved a ... More Less

Woman Times Seven was announced in a 9 Feb 1966 NYT article as the next project for writer-director team Cesare Zavattini and Vittorio De Sica, who had just signed a three-picture deal with Embassy Pictures Corp. The project, then referred to as Woman x Seven, was slated to be the first of the three productions, all of which would be financed entirely by Embassy at budgets of $1-$3 million, in exchange for worldwide distribution rights. Although Zavattini and De Sica were both Italian, none of the pictures were expected to qualify as native Italian productions and therefore would not be eligible for subsidies from the Italian government.
       Natalie Wood and Shirley MacLaine were said to be the top two contenders for the female lead, which involved seven separate roles in the screenplay’s vignettes. MacLaine’s casting was confirmed in the 1 Jun 1966 Var. Various contemporary sources reported her salary as between $800,000 and $1 million, although the 30 Jun 1967 DV claimed that a “production source” verified she was paid “a flat $850,000, with no participations.”
       Principal photography began in Paris, France, on 10 Oct 1966, as noted in a 14 Oct 1966 DV production chart. Around that time, the 19 Oct 1966 Var stated that the film would cost an estimated $4 million. An item in the 9 Nov 1966 Var described Woman Times Seven as Embassy chief Joseph E. Levine’s “biggest self-financed film,” and noted that Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp. had acquired foreign distribution rights for an undisclosed price that may or may not have involved a payment in advance of the film’s completion. The 2 Dec 1966 DV added that the picture would be the costliest to be shot in Europe in 1966. Due to its contribution to the local economy, producer Arthur Cohn was said to be baffled by the lack of “compensations or at least partial film aid” from the French government.
       While shooting was underway, a 23 Nov 1966 Var news brief announced that actors Michael Caine and Robert Morley would appear in the film, while Rock Hudson had recently dropped out. Shortly after, a 30 Nov 1966 Var item listed Akim Tamiroff as a cast member.
       Embassy’s European press agent, Harvey Matofsky, went to France in order to personally supervise relations with the press there, according to a 12 Oct 1966 Var brief, which also named Bayley Silleck as the unit publicist and Patrick Morin as a special still photographer.
       Sometime during production, the 18 Jan 1967 DV reported that De Sica had become a French citizen, in order to divorce his estranged wife Guiditta Rissone, and get remarried to María Mercader. Var also noted that Italian producer Carlo Ponti had previously done the same thing by becoming a French citizen to gain a divorce.
       Advertisements for the film showed De Sica’s name before the title, i.e. “Vittorio De Sica’s ‘Woman Times Seven.’” According to the 10 May 1967 Var, the ads were an example of a recent trend of “over-title billing for non-writers” that conflicted with a Writers Guild of America (WGA) clause meant to forbid such a practice.
       The film premiered on 27 Jun 1967 at the Lincoln Art Theatre in New York City, which was owned, at that time, by Embassy Pictures Corp., the 7 Jun 1967 Var noted. A general release followed the next day at the Lincoln Art and Loew’s Tower East. A West Coast premiere occurred on 29 Jun 1967 at the Vogue Theatre in Los Angeles, CA, and was followed by a general release there on 30 Jun 1967. Critical reception was mixed, but Shirley MacLaine’s performance was recognized by a Golden Globe Award nomination for Actress in a Leading Role – Musical or Comedy.
       The film opened in Paris, France in Oct 1967 as Sept fois femme. In Italy, it was released as Sette volte donna .
       On 4 Jun 1967, NYT announced that De Sica and Zavattini had ended their partnership with Embassy for undisclosed reasons, and that the remaining two of their three-picture deal would not be made.
       The participation of the Société Nouvelle des Films Cormoran is unconfirmed. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
LOCATION
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
14 Oct 1966
p. 13.
Daily Variety
2 Dec 1966
p. 9.
Daily Variety
12 Jan 1967
p. 2.
Daily Variety
18 Jan 1967
p. 24.
Daily Variety
19 Jan 1967
p. 2.
Daily Variety
22 May 1967
p. 3.
Daily Variety
19 Jun 1967
p. 3, 11.
Daily Variety
30 Jun 1967
p. 4.
Los Angeles Times
20 May 1967
Section B, p. 7.
Los Angeles Times
2 Jun 1967
Section D, p. 10.
Los Angeles Times
29 Jun 1967
Section C, p. 19.
New York Times
9 Feb 1966
p. 32.
New York Times
12 Mar 1967
p. 31, 84-88.
New York Times
4 Jun 1967
p. 11, 14.
New York Times
28 Jun 1967
p. 38.
Variety
1 Jun 1966
p. 20.
Variety
31 Aug 1966
p. 22.
Variety
12 Oct 1966
p. 2, 78.
Variety
12 Oct 1966
p. 32.
Variety
19 Oct 1966
p. 3.
Variety
9 Nov 1966
p. 4.
Variety
23 Nov 1966
p. 22.
Variety
30 Nov 1966
p. 14.
Variety
10 May 1967
p. 5.
Variety
7 Jun 1967
p. 18.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
An Arthur Cohn Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Pers asst to mr. de sica
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus comp & cond
SOUND
MAKEUP
Hairstyles
PRODUCTION MISC
Titles
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Woman x Seven
Sept fois femme
Sette volte donna
Release Date:
28 June 1967
Premiere Information:
New York premiere: 27 June 1967
New York opening: 28 June 1967
Los Angeles premiere: 29 June 1967
Los Angeles opening: 30 June 1967
Production Date:
began 10 October 1966
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Pathé
Duration(in mins):
99
Countries:
France, United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

FUNERAL PROCESSION: Leading the cortege behind her late husband's coffin, a young widow is consoled by family friend Jean; and as he confesses that he loves her, the widow's grief slowly disappears. So engrossed do they become in making plans for going away together that they miss a fork in the road and veer off to the left, while the shocked mourners continue to follow the hearse to the right. AMATEUR NIGHT: Discovering her husband in bed with another woman, an outraged wife storms out of the house vowing to sleep with the first man she meets. After joining a group of prostitutes and discovering that she is unable to carry out her threat, she accepts an accommodating procurer's offer to drive her home. When the hysterical husband greets them with insults, the procurer sends him sprawling with one punch. Seeing her husband lying in the street, the wife runs to comfort him. TWO AGAINST ONE: During an international cybernetics congress, a beautiful, bored interpreter explains to two amorous delegates, an Italian and a Scotsman, that her lover cares only for her mind and soul. To illustrate her point, she brings them to her flat and reads T. S. Eliot to them while in the nude. When one of them touches her, she furiously accuses them of reverting to the Stone Age. So repentant are they that they willingly accept cruel slaps from each other. Greatly impressed by the demonstration, the interpreter tosses her lover's picture out of the window and joins the delegates on a bed. THE SUPER-SIMONE: A plain housewife is married to a hack writer known for his fictional heroine "Simone," a femme fatale who enslaves ... +


FUNERAL PROCESSION: Leading the cortege behind her late husband's coffin, a young widow is consoled by family friend Jean; and as he confesses that he loves her, the widow's grief slowly disappears. So engrossed do they become in making plans for going away together that they miss a fork in the road and veer off to the left, while the shocked mourners continue to follow the hearse to the right. AMATEUR NIGHT: Discovering her husband in bed with another woman, an outraged wife storms out of the house vowing to sleep with the first man she meets. After joining a group of prostitutes and discovering that she is unable to carry out her threat, she accepts an accommodating procurer's offer to drive her home. When the hysterical husband greets them with insults, the procurer sends him sprawling with one punch. Seeing her husband lying in the street, the wife runs to comfort him. TWO AGAINST ONE: During an international cybernetics congress, a beautiful, bored interpreter explains to two amorous delegates, an Italian and a Scotsman, that her lover cares only for her mind and soul. To illustrate her point, she brings them to her flat and reads T. S. Eliot to them while in the nude. When one of them touches her, she furiously accuses them of reverting to the Stone Age. So repentant are they that they willingly accept cruel slaps from each other. Greatly impressed by the demonstration, the interpreter tosses her lover's picture out of the window and joins the delegates on a bed. THE SUPER-SIMONE: A plain housewife is married to a hack writer known for his fictional heroine "Simone," a femme fatale who enslaves men by her wild and unpredictable nature. In a pathetic attempt to emulate the Super-Simone, the wife behaves in such a bizarre fashion that her startled husband brings home a psychiatrist. When she realizes that they believe that she has lost her mind, the wife races out of their garret apartment onto the roof and wails, "I'm not crazy. I'm just in love." AT THE OPERA: When a wealthy Parisian socialite learns that a rival is wearing a copy of her new gown to the opening of the Opéra, she orders three of her husband's aides to bomb the rival's limousine. But a third woman, a plump and elderly matron, also appears in the same gown, and the humiliated socialite bolts out of the theater. As she does so, she spies her rival, blackened and disheveled from the bomb explosion, making a determined entrance. Anticipating her rival's reaction to the third woman, the socialite bursts into laughter. THE SUICIDES: Victims of a hopeless affair, a young wife and her married lover form a suicide pact. Dressed as a bride and groom, they plan to take their lives in a tacky hotel room. But they quarrel about the method they should use, and the woman goes into the bathroom. Once alone, the lover changes his mind and starts to sneak away. But as he opens the door he hears a window break in the bathroom. Peering out, he spots his beloved running down the fire escape to the street below. SNOW: While shopping with a friend, a faithful wife discovers that they are being eyed by a handsome stranger. And, when she leaves her friend, the wife is secretly thrilled to see that the man is following her. Arriving home, she greets her husband and then gazes out of the window at the stranger on the snowy street below. Overjoyed at the thought that men are still intrigued by her, the wife sighs with happiness. (Perhaps she will never know that the handsome stranger is a private detective hired by her suspicious husband.) +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.