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HISTORY

The 9 May 1961 DV announced that the Universal-International (U-I) picture, provisionally titled Touch of Mink, would be the first onscreen teaming of Doris Day and Cary Grant. The studio was considering contract actress Laura Devin for a role, as noted in the 25 May 1961 DV. Comedienne Kaye Ballard was also under consideration, but she was already committed to the 1961 Broadway musical, Carnival. Principal photography began 10 Jul 1961, according to 14 Jul 1961 DV production charts.
       A news item in the 20 Jul 1961 DV noted that Cary Grant telephoned the
French automotive company, Citroën, to order a new car for use in the film. The factory reportedly shipped “the display model” to the studio without hesitation. The 21 Jul 1961 DV reprinted the text of that day’s call sheet for the “automat sequence,” which advised cast members to forego breakfast, “as lunch scenes will be filmed all day.” The 26 Jul 1961 DV later revealed that the automat food dispensers were altered for the second day of shooting to accept counterfeit coins, or “slugs,” rather than real U.S. currency. On 3 Aug 1961, DV reported that the company was moving that day to Burbank, CA, for exterior filming on the “New York City” set at Warner Bros. Studios. The 13 Jun 1961 NYT stated that stand-ins would substitute for Day and Grant during location filming in Bermuda. Careful attention was paid to matching the stars’ wardrobes to that of their doubles, especially in the case ... More Less

The 9 May 1961 DV announced that the Universal-International (U-I) picture, provisionally titled Touch of Mink, would be the first onscreen teaming of Doris Day and Cary Grant. The studio was considering contract actress Laura Devin for a role, as noted in the 25 May 1961 DV. Comedienne Kaye Ballard was also under consideration, but she was already committed to the 1961 Broadway musical, Carnival. Principal photography began 10 Jul 1961, according to 14 Jul 1961 DV production charts.
       A news item in the 20 Jul 1961 DV noted that Cary Grant telephoned the
French automotive company, Citroën, to order a new car for use in the film. The factory reportedly shipped “the display model” to the studio without hesitation. The 21 Jul 1961 DV reprinted the text of that day’s call sheet for the “automat sequence,” which advised cast members to forego breakfast, “as lunch scenes will be filmed all day.” The 26 Jul 1961 DV later revealed that the automat food dispensers were altered for the second day of shooting to accept counterfeit coins, or “slugs,” rather than real U.S. currency. On 3 Aug 1961, DV reported that the company was moving that day to Burbank, CA, for exterior filming on the “New York City” set at Warner Bros. Studios. The 13 Jun 1961 NYT stated that stand-ins would substitute for Day and Grant during location filming in Bermuda. Careful attention was paid to matching the stars’ wardrobes to that of their doubles, especially in the case of Doris Day, whose clothing determined the color scheme of the sets.
       Casting announcements included Sally Hughes (12 Jul 1961 DV) ; Rosalind Roberts (17 Jul 1961 DV) ; Helen Brown and Kathryn Givney (24 Jul 1961 DV) ; veteran actress Minta Durfee Arbuckle (25 Jul 1961 DV) ; William Lanteau (27 Jul 1961 DV) ; Bernard Deacon (28 Jul 1961 DV) ; Edna Bennett (2 Aug 1961 DV) ; Laiola Wendorff (7 Aug 1961 DV) ; Ralph Manza and Fred Essler (8 Aug 1961 DV) ; Wally Brooks (10 Aug 1961 DV) ; Barbara Pollentine (17 Aug 1961 DV) ; Alice Backes (23 Aug 1961 DV) ; Nelson Olmsted (31 Aug 1961 DV) ; Cathy Merchant (5 Sep 1961 DV) ; William Gleason (18 Sep 1961 DV) ; Yvonne Peattie (21 Sep 1961 DV). The film marked the screen debut of nightclub entertainer June Ericson, and baseball stars Yogi Berra, Roger Maris, and Mickey Mantle.
       On 10 Jan 1962, DV reported that George Duning was recording his musical score with a forty-five-piece orchestra. The 30 Apr 1962 DV noted that U-I’s Don McDonald was embarking that day on a “‘personalized publicity service’ tour,” meeting with entertainment editors in twenty-one cities on behalf of five upcoming releases, including the re-titled That Touch of Mink. According to the 6 Jun 1962 DV, a private screening was scheduled for the following night at the Academy Theatre. The audience was comprised of members of the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees (IATSE) Publicists, the Hollywood Women’s Press Corp, and the Los Angeles Press Photographers. The location of the theater cannot be determined from available information.
       That Touch of Mink opened 14 Jun 1962 in New York City, 15 Jun 1962 in Chicago, IL, and 20 Jul 1962 in Los Angeles, CA. Reviews were generally positive, although the 9 May 1962 DV credited co-stars Audrey Meadows and Gig Young with providing much of the comedy. However, the reviewer took exception to Young’s portrayal of an unethical psychiatrist, believing it disparaged a “critical area of medicine.” The 15 Feb 1962 DV reported that the Catholic Church’s Legion of Decency gave the film a “B” rating for “glamorizing illicit sex and treating perversion as humor.” Regardless, the picture earned a record-breaking $123,000 in its first four days at New York City’s Radio City Music Hall, as stated in the 18 Jun 1962 DV. The 2 Aug 1962 DV reported Los Angeles receipts of $444,019 over two weeks. That Touch of Mink was ranked the fourth highest rental of 1962, earning approximately $8.5 million, according to the 9 Jan 1963 Var. The 4 Jan 1963 NYT reported that readers of Motion Picture Herald voted Doris Day “the top audience-attracting film star” in the U.S. and Canada.
       The picture was nominated for three Academy Awards: Writing—Story and Screenplay, Written Directly for the Screen (Stanley Shapiro, Nate Monaster); Art Direction-Set Decoration—Color (Alexander Golitzen, Robert Clatworthy, George Milo); and Sound (Waldon O. Watson). It won a Golden Globe Award for Best Motion Picture—Comedy, Golden Laurel Awards for Day, Grant, and Young, along with an award for Top Comedy, and a Writers Guild of America (WGA) Award. In the 25 Mar 1962 LAT, columnist Joe Hyams gave Day a mock “Award for Narcissism,” noting that she insisted on all of her 8,547 freckles (which she reportedly tallied) appearing in her close-ups. When Hyams repeated the story a year later in the 24 Mar 1963 LAT, he lowered the number of freckles to 584.
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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
9 May 1961
p. 1.
Daily Variety
25 May 1961
p. 2, 14.
Daily Variety
12 Jul 1961
p. 4.
Daily Variety
14 Jul 1961
p. 9.
Daily Variety
17 Jul 1962
p. 2.
Daily Variety
20 Jul 1961
p. 2.
Daily Variety
21 Jul 1961
p. 5.
Daily Variety
24 Jul 1961
p. 6.
Daily Variety
25 Jul 1961
p. 4.
Daily Variety
26 Jul 1961
p. 2, 8.
Daily Variety
27 Jul 1961
p. 10.
Daily Variety
28 Jul 1961
p. 19.
Daily Variety
2 Aug 1961
p. 4.
Daily Variety
3 Aug 1961
p. 3.
Daily Variety
7 Aug 1961
p. 2.
Daily Variety
8 Aug 1961
p. 2.
Daily Variety
10 Aug 1961
p. 8.
Daily Variety
17 Aug 1961
p. 7.
Daily Variety
23 Aug 1961
p. 5.
Daily Variety
31 Aug 1961
p. 4.
Daily Variety
5 Sep 1961
p. 3.
Daily Variety
18 Sep 1961
p. 7.
Daily Variety
21 Sep 1961
p. 4.
Daily Variety
10 Jan 1962
p. 10.
Daily Variety
15 Feb 1962
p. 1.
Daily Variety
30 Apr 1962
p. 6.
Daily Variety
9 May 1962
p. 3.
Daily Variety
6 Jun 1962
p. 7.
Daily Variety
14 Jun 1962
p. 7.
Daily Variety
18 Jun 1962
p. 3.
Daily Variety
2 Aug 1962
p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
25 Mar 1962
Section TW, p. 10.
Los Angeles Times
20 Jul 1962
Section C, p. 13.
Los Angeles Times
24 Mar 1963
Section B, p. 12.
New York Times
13 Jun 1961
p. 29.
New York Times
3 Aug 1961
p. 13.
New York Times
14 Jun 1962
p. 23.
New York Times
15 Jun 1962
p. 16.
New York Times
4 Jan 1963
p. 5.
Variety
9 Jan 1963
p. 13.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
Fashions
MUSIC
VISUAL EFFECTS
Titles executed by
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit prod mgr
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
A Touch of Mink
Release Date:
14 June 1962
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 14 June 1962
Chicago opening: 15 June 1962
Los Angeles opening: 20 July 1962
Production Date:
began 10 July 1961
Copyright Claimant:
Granley Co.
Copyright Date:
24 May 1962
Copyright Number:
LP24721
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Eastman Color by Pathé
Widescreen/ratio
Duration(in mins):
99
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

On her way to cash her unemployment check Cathy Timberlake is splattered with mud by a passing limousine belonging to tycoon Philip Shayne, a bachelor. Later, Philip spots Cathy entering an automat and sends his rebellious financial adviser, Roger, to apologize and offer her money for her ruined dress. Goaded on by both Roger and her worldly-wise roommate, Connie, Cathy decides to visit Philip personally to express her indignation. When she does meet the suave charmer, however, her wrath melts, and she agrees to accompany him on a business trip to Baltimore. Philip then takes Cathy to Philadelphia for cocktails, to Manhattan for his speech at the U. N., and then on to dinner and a baseball game. His platonic attitude ends, however, when he suggests a trip to Bermuda. At first Cathy refuses, but later she reconsiders and ends up flying to the island with a lavish wardrobe, mink coat included, supplied by her generous host. But with the coming of night Cathy is so nervous that she develops a skin rash; and Philip spends the night playing gin rummy with another frustrated male. Back in New York, Cathy feels ashamed of herself and decides to return for a second attempt at romance. This time she takes a drink to fortify herself, gets drunk, and falls off a balcony. Disgusted, Philip returns to New York and no longer attempts to call her. To arouse his jealousy, Roger arranges for Cathy to go to a motel with a lecherous unemployment clerk, Beasley. Following a wild chase, Philip "rescues" Cathy and impulsively proposes marriage. As they arrive in Bermuda for their honeymoon, Philip suddenly realizes he is a married man; ... +


On her way to cash her unemployment check Cathy Timberlake is splattered with mud by a passing limousine belonging to tycoon Philip Shayne, a bachelor. Later, Philip spots Cathy entering an automat and sends his rebellious financial adviser, Roger, to apologize and offer her money for her ruined dress. Goaded on by both Roger and her worldly-wise roommate, Connie, Cathy decides to visit Philip personally to express her indignation. When she does meet the suave charmer, however, her wrath melts, and she agrees to accompany him on a business trip to Baltimore. Philip then takes Cathy to Philadelphia for cocktails, to Manhattan for his speech at the U. N., and then on to dinner and a baseball game. His platonic attitude ends, however, when he suggests a trip to Bermuda. At first Cathy refuses, but later she reconsiders and ends up flying to the island with a lavish wardrobe, mink coat included, supplied by her generous host. But with the coming of night Cathy is so nervous that she develops a skin rash; and Philip spends the night playing gin rummy with another frustrated male. Back in New York, Cathy feels ashamed of herself and decides to return for a second attempt at romance. This time she takes a drink to fortify herself, gets drunk, and falls off a balcony. Disgusted, Philip returns to New York and no longer attempts to call her. To arouse his jealousy, Roger arranges for Cathy to go to a motel with a lecherous unemployment clerk, Beasley. Following a wild chase, Philip "rescues" Cathy and impulsively proposes marriage. As they arrive in Bermuda for their honeymoon, Philip suddenly realizes he is a married man; overcome by nervousness, he breaks out in a skin rash. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.