Beach Party (1963)

101 mins | Comedy | 7 August 1963

Director:

William Asher

Writer:

Lou Rusoff

Cinematographer:

Kay Norton

Editor:

Homer Powell

Production Designer:

Daniel Haller

Production Company:

Alta Vista Productions
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HISTORY

The 29 Jun 1962 DV announced the scheduled start of principal photography in Sep 1962. According to the 7 Sep 1962 DV, the film was the first of three to star actor-singer Frankie Avalon under his contract with American International Pictures (AIP). He appeared earlier that year in the AIP production, Panic in Year Zero! (1962, see entry). More than seven months later, the 26 Apr 1963 LAT reported that singer-actress Annette Funicello was joining the cast, on loan from the Walt Disney Company. The 15 Apr 1963 LAT noted that lead actor and licensed pilot Bob Cummings would fly his own airplane on camera. A news item in the 5 Mar 1963 DV included singer Patti Page among the cast, but she did not appear in the completed film.
       Principal photography began 25 Apr 1963 in Malibu, CA, as noted that day in DV. Interior scenes were to be shot at Republic Studios in Studio City, CA. The 5 Sep 1963 LAT included CA beaches Newport, Laguna, and Balboa among the locations. Beach Party was reportedly the first comedy produced by AIP, known primarily for horror and science fiction films. On 29 May 1963, DV stated that a sequel was being planned for Funicello and Avalon.
       The 1 Jul 1963 DV announced that AIP was gathering statistics from state chapters of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce “to determine the best American city for teenagers.” The winning city would be declared “Teentown U.S.A.” ... More Less

The 29 Jun 1962 DV announced the scheduled start of principal photography in Sep 1962. According to the 7 Sep 1962 DV, the film was the first of three to star actor-singer Frankie Avalon under his contract with American International Pictures (AIP). He appeared earlier that year in the AIP production, Panic in Year Zero! (1962, see entry). More than seven months later, the 26 Apr 1963 LAT reported that singer-actress Annette Funicello was joining the cast, on loan from the Walt Disney Company. The 15 Apr 1963 LAT noted that lead actor and licensed pilot Bob Cummings would fly his own airplane on camera. A news item in the 5 Mar 1963 DV included singer Patti Page among the cast, but she did not appear in the completed film.
       Principal photography began 25 Apr 1963 in Malibu, CA, as noted that day in DV. Interior scenes were to be shot at Republic Studios in Studio City, CA. The 5 Sep 1963 LAT included CA beaches Newport, Laguna, and Balboa among the locations. Beach Party was reportedly the first comedy produced by AIP, known primarily for horror and science fiction films. On 29 May 1963, DV stated that a sequel was being planned for Funicello and Avalon.
       The 1 Jul 1963 DV announced that AIP was gathering statistics from state chapters of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce “to determine the best American city for teenagers.” The winning city would be declared “Teentown U.S.A.” and host the Aug 1963 premiere, to be attended by cast members Annette Funicello, Frankie Avalon, Bob Cummings, Dorothy Malone, Harvey Lembeck, Morey Amsterdam, Jody McCrea, John Ashley, Eva Six, and Dick Dale. That same issue also featured an obituary for writer-producer Lou Rusoff, who died of cancer two days earlier. Although Rusoff was given sole credit for the screenplay, author Mark McGee stated in his 1996 book, Faster and Furiouser: The Revised and Fattened Fable of American International Pictures, that the final script, loosely based on Rusoff’s original story, was written by director William Asher and associate producer Robert Dillon. At the request of AIP executive Samuel Z. Arkoff, Asher and Dillon relinquished writing credit in deference to the terminally ill Rusoff. According to Dillon’s daughter, Alexandra Dillon, her mother suggested naming Harvey Lembeck’s character “Eric Von Zipper.”
       On 12 Jul 1963, LAT announced that AIP extended Avalon’s contract to four years, offered Funicello a seven-year contract, and guaranteed two pictures each to Lembeck and Ashley. Three days later, the 15 Jul 1963 DV noted that the film would open at 500 theaters across the U.S. Reviews were tepid, although the 26 Sep 1963 NYT complimented Funicello and Avalon on their “modest acting ability.” A news item in the 19 Jul 1963 DV revealed that AIP allocated $500,000 for radio and television advertising, the largest promotional budget in the company’s history. According to the 12 Aug 1963 DV, seven publicists were assigned to the project. Radio personality Ken Niles provided voice-over for broadcast advertising, as stated in the 30 Aug 1963 DV.
       Beach Party opened 11 Sep 1963 in Los Angeles, CA. The 13 Sep 1963 DV declared opening day receipts of $48,226 a new record for AIP, and the 17 Sep 1963 DV reported earnings of $292,800 from thirty locations during the first week. As noted in the 4 Sep 1963 DV, the film, along with other recent AIP releases, earned company executives James H. Nicholson and Samuel Z. Arkoff the Allied States Association “Producers of the Year” award, to be presented the following month in New York City.
       Beach Party was followed by several sequels, including Muscle Beach Party (1964), Bikini Beach (1964), Beach Blanket Bingo (1965), and How to Stuff a Wild Bikini (1965, see entries), all featuring Avalon, Funicello, McCrea, Ashley, and Lembeck.
The 29 Jun 1962 DV announced the scheduled start of principal photography in Sep 1962. According to the 7 Sep 1962 DV, the film was the first of three to star actor-singer Frankie Avalon under his contract with American International Pictures (AIP). He appeared earlier that year in the AIP production, Panic in Year Zero! (1962, see entry). More than seven months later, the 26 Apr 1963 LAT reported that singer-actress Annette Funicello was joining the cast, on loan from the Walt Disney Company. The 15 Apr 1963 LAT noted that lead actor and licensed pilot Bob Cummings would fly his own airplane on camera. A news item in the 5 Mar 1963 DV included singer Patti Page among the cast, but she did not appear in the completed film.
       Principal photography began 25 Apr 1963 in Malibu, CA, as noted that day in DV. Interior scenes were to be shot at Republic Studios in Studio City, CA. The 5 Sep 1963 LAT included CA beaches Newport, Laguna, and Balboa among the locations. Beach Party was reportedly the first comedy produced by AIP, known primarily for horror and science fiction films. On 29 May 1963, DV stated that a sequel was being planned for Funicello and Avalon.
       The 1 Jul 1963 DV announced that AIP was gathering statistics from state chapters of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce “to determine the best American city for teenagers.” The winning city would be declared “Teentown U.S.A.” and host the Aug 1963 premiere, to be attended by cast members Annette Funicello, Frankie Avalon, Bob Cummings, Dorothy Malone, Harvey Lembeck, Morey Amsterdam, Jody McCrea, John Ashley, Eva Six, and Dick Dale. That same issue also featured an obituary for writer-producer Lou Rusoff, who died of cancer two days earlier. Although Rusoff was given sole credit for the screenplay, author Mark McGee stated in his 1996 book, Faster and Furiouser: The Revised and Fattened Fable of American International Pictures, that the final script, loosely based on Rusoff’s original story, was written by director William Asher and associate producer Robert Dillon. At the request of AIP executive Samuel Z. Arkoff, Asher and Dillon relinquished writing credit in deference to the terminally ill Rusoff. According to Dillon’s daughter, Alexandra Dillon, her mother suggested naming Harvey Lembeck’s character “Eric Von Zipper.”
       On 12 Jul 1963, LAT announced that AIP extended Avalon’s contract to four years, offered Funicello a seven-year contract, and guaranteed two pictures each to Lembeck and Ashley. Three days later, the 15 Jul 1963 DV noted that the film would open at 500 theaters across the U.S. Reviews were tepid, although the 26 Sep 1963 NYT complimented Funicello and Avalon on their “modest acting ability.” A news item in the 19 Jul 1963 DV revealed that AIP allocated $500,000 for radio and television advertising, the largest promotional budget in the company’s history. According to the 12 Aug 1963 DV, seven publicists were assigned to the project. Radio personality Ken Niles provided voice-over for broadcast advertising, as stated in the 30 Aug 1963 DV.
       Beach Party opened 11 Sep 1963 in Los Angeles, CA. The 13 Sep 1963 DV declared opening day receipts of $48,226 a new record for AIP, and the 17 Sep 1963 DV reported earnings of $292,800 from thirty locations during the first week. As noted in the 4 Sep 1963 DV, the film, along with other recent AIP releases, earned company executives James H. Nicholson and Samuel Z. Arkoff the Allied States Association “Producers of the Year” award, to be presented the following month in New York City.
       Beach Party was followed by several sequels, including Muscle Beach Party (1964), Bikini Beach (1964), Beach Blanket Bingo (1965), and How to Stuff a Wild Bikini (1965, see entries), all featuring Avalon, Funicello, McCrea, Ashley, and Lembeck.
The 29 Jun 1962 DV announced the scheduled start of principal photography in Sep 1962. According to the 7 Sep 1962 DV, the film was the first of three to star actor-singer Frankie Avalon under his contract with American International Pictures (AIP). He appeared earlier that year in the AIP production, Panic in Year Zero! (1962, see entry). More than seven months later, the 26 Apr 1963 LAT reported that singer-actress Annette Funicello was joining the cast, on loan from the Walt Disney Company. The 15 Apr 1963 LAT noted that lead actor and licensed pilot Bob Cummings would fly his own airplane on camera. A news item in the 5 Mar 1963 DV included singer Patti Page among the cast, but she did not appear in the completed film.
       Principal photography began 25 Apr 1963 in Malibu, CA, as noted that day in DV. Interior scenes were to be shot at Republic Studios in Studio City, CA. The 5 Sep 1963 LAT included CA beaches Newport, Laguna, and Balboa among the locations. Beach Party was reportedly the first comedy produced by AIP, known primarily for horror and science fiction films. On 29 May 1963, DV stated that a sequel was being planned for Funicello and Avalon.
       The 1 Jul 1963 DV announced that AIP was gathering statistics from state chapters of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce “to determine the best American city for teenagers.” The winning city would be declared “Teentown U.S.A.” and host the Aug 1963 premiere, to be attended by cast members Annette Funicello, Frankie Avalon, Bob Cummings, Dorothy Malone, Harvey Lembeck, Morey Amsterdam, Jody McCrea, John Ashley, Eva Six, and Dick Dale. That same issue also featured an obituary for writer-producer Lou Rusoff, who died of cancer two days earlier. Although Rusoff was given sole credit for the screenplay, author Mark McGee stated in his 1996 book, Faster and Furiouser: The Revised and Fattened Fable of American International Pictures, that the final script, loosely based on Rusoff’s original story, was written by director William Asher and associate producer Robert Dillon. At the request of AIP executive Samuel Z. Arkoff, Asher and Dillon relinquished writing credit in deference to the terminally ill Rusoff. According to Dillon’s daughter, Alexandra Dillon, her mother suggested naming Harvey Lembeck’s character “Eric Von Zipper.”
       On 12 Jul 1963, LAT announced that AIP extended Avalon’s contract to four years, offered Funicello a seven-year contract, and guaranteed two pictures each to Lembeck and Ashley. Three days later, the 15 Jul 1963 DV noted that the film would open at 500 theaters across the U.S. Reviews were tepid, although the 26 Sep 1963 NYT complimented Funicello and Avalon on their “modest acting ability.” A news item in the 19 Jul 1963 DV revealed that AIP allocated $500,000 for radio and television advertising, the largest promotional budget in the company’s history. According to the 12 Aug 1963 DV, seven publicists were assigned to the project. Radio personality Ken Niles provided voice-over for broadcast advertising, as stated in the 30 Aug 1963 DV.
       Beach Party opened 11 Sep 1963 in Los Angeles, CA. The 13 Sep 1963 DV declared opening day receipts of $48,226 a new record for AIP, and the 17 Sep 1963 DV reported earnings of $292,800 from thirty locations during the first week. As noted in the 4 Sep 1963 DV, the film, along with other recent AIP releases, earned company executives James H. Nicholson and Samuel Z. Arkoff the Allied States Association “Producers of the Year” award, to be presented the following month in New York City.
       Beach Party was followed by several sequels, including Muscle Beach Party (1964), Bikini Beach (1964), Beach Blanket Bingo (1965), and How to Stuff a Wild Bikini (1965, see entries), all featuring Avalon, Funicello, McCrea, Ashley, and Lembeck.
The 29 Jun 1962 DV announced the scheduled start of principal photography in Sep 1962. According to the 7 Sep 1962 DV, the film was the first of three to star actor-singer Frankie Avalon under his contract with American International Pictures (AIP). He appeared earlier that year in the AIP production, Panic in Year Zero! (1962, see entry). More than seven months later, the 26 Apr 1963 LAT reported that singer-actress Annette Funicello was joining the cast, on loan from the Walt Disney Company. The 15 Apr 1963 LAT noted that lead actor and licensed pilot Bob Cummings would fly his own airplane on camera. A news item in the 5 Mar 1963 DV included singer Patti Page among the cast, but she did not appear in the completed film.
       Principal photography began 25 Apr 1963 in Malibu, CA, as noted that day in DV. Interior scenes were to be shot at Republic Studios in Studio City, CA. The 5 Sep 1963 LAT included CA beaches Newport, Laguna, and Balboa among the locations. Beach Party was reportedly the first comedy produced by AIP, known primarily for horror and science fiction films. On 29 May 1963, DV stated that a sequel was being planned for Funicello and Avalon.
       The 1 Jul 1963 DV announced that AIP was gathering statistics from state chapters of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce “to determine the best American city for teenagers.” The winning city would be declared “Teentown U.S.A.” and host the Aug 1963 premiere, to be attended by cast members Annette Funicello, Frankie Avalon, Bob Cummings, Dorothy Malone, Harvey Lembeck, Morey Amsterdam, Jody McCrea, John Ashley, Eva Six, and Dick Dale. That same issue also featured an obituary for writer-producer Lou Rusoff, who died of cancer two days earlier. Although Rusoff was given sole credit for the screenplay, author Mark McGee stated in his 1996 book, Faster and Furiouser: The Revised and Fattened Fable of American International Pictures, that the final script, loosely based on Rusoff’s original story, was written by director William Asher and associate producer Robert Dillon. At the request of AIP executive Samuel Z. Arkoff, Asher and Dillon relinquished writing credit in deference to the terminally ill Rusoff. According to Dillon’s daughter, Alexandra Dillon, her mother suggested naming Harvey Lembeck’s character “Eric Von Zipper.”
       On 12 Jul 1963, LAT announced that AIP extended Avalon’s contract to four years, offered Funicello a seven-year contract, and guaranteed two pictures each to Lembeck and Ashley. Three days later, the 15 Jul 1963 DV noted that the film would open at 500 theaters across the U.S. Reviews were tepid, although the 26 Sep 1963 NYT complimented Funicello and Avalon on their “modest acting ability.” A news item in the 19 Jul 1963 DV revealed that AIP allocated $500,000 for radio and television advertising, the largest promotional budget in the company’s history. According to the 12 Aug 1963 DV, seven publicists were assigned to the project. Radio personality Ken Niles provided voice-over for broadcast advertising, as stated in the 30 Aug 1963 DV.
       Beach Party opened 11 Sep 1963 in Los Angeles, CA. The 13 Sep 1963 DV declared opening day receipts of $48,226 a new record for AIP, and the 17 Sep 1963 DV reported earnings of $292,800 from thirty locations during the first week. As noted in the 4 Sep 1963 DV, the film, along with other recent AIP releases, earned company executives James H. Nicholson and Samuel Z. Arkoff the Allied States Association “Producers of the Year” award, to be presented the following month in New York City.
       Beach Party was followed by several sequels, including Muscle Beach Party (1964), Bikini Beach (1964), Beach Blanket Bingo (1965), and How to Stuff a Wild Bikini (1965, see entries), all featuring Avalon, Funicello, McCrea, Ashley, and Lembeck.
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
29 Jun 1962
p. 3.
Daily Variety
7 Sep 1962
p. 6.
Daily Variety
5 Mar 1963
p. 10.
Daily Variety
23 Apr 1963
p. 10.
Daily Variety
25 Apr 1963
p. 3.
Daily Variety
29 May 1963
p. 2.
Daily Variety
1 Jul 1963
p. 4, 15.
Daily Variety
15 Jul 1963
p. 3.
Daily Variety
19 Jul 1963
p. 13.
Daily Variety
8 Aug 1963
p. 2, 4.
Daily Variety
12 Aug 1963
p. 5.
Daily Variety
30 Aug 1963
p. 16.
Daily Variety
4 Sep 1963
p. 1.
Daily Variety
5 Sep 1963
p. 8.
Daily Variety
13 Sep 1963
p. 3.
Daily Variety
17 Sep 1963
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
15 Apr 1963
Section C, p. 12.
Los Angeles Times
26 Apr 1963
Section C, p. 10.
Los Angeles Times
12 Jul 1963
Section D, p. 11.
Los Angeles Times
23 Aug 1963
Section C, p. 10.
Los Angeles Times
5 Sep 1963
Section C, p. 9.
Los Angeles Times
12 Sep 1963
Section C, p. 7.
Los Angeles Times
1 Oct 1963
Section D, p. 8.
New York Times
26 Sep 1963
p. 40.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A James H. Nicholson-Samuel Z. Arkoff Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
Exec prod
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost supv
Cost supv
MUSIC
Mus score
Mus coordinator
SOUND
Sd ed
Sd asst
Sd asst
Music ed
VISUAL EFFECTS
Photog sp eff
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairdresser
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod supv
Unit mgr
Prod asst
Scr supv
Constr coordinator
Best boy
Stills
Main titles
SOURCES
SONGS
"Beach Party," words and music by Gary Usher and Roger Christian, sung by Annette Funicello and Frankie Avalon
"Swingin' and A-Surfin'," words and music by Gary Usher and Roger Christian, performed by Dick Dale and the Del Tones: and "Secret Surfin' Spot," words and music by Gary Usher and Roger Christian
"Promise Me Anything (Give Me More)," words and music by Guy Hemric and Jerry Styner, sung by Annette Funicello
+
SONGS
"Beach Party," words and music by Gary Usher and Roger Christian, sung by Annette Funicello and Frankie Avalon
"Swingin' and A-Surfin'," words and music by Gary Usher and Roger Christian, performed by Dick Dale and the Del Tones: and "Secret Surfin' Spot," words and music by Gary Usher and Roger Christian
"Promise Me Anything (Give Me More)," words and music by Guy Hemric and Jerry Styner, sung by Annette Funicello
"Treat Him Nicely," words and music by Guy Hemric and Jerry Styner, sung by Annette Funicello
"Don't Stop Now," words and music by Bob Marcucci and Russ Faith, sung by Frankie Avalon.
+
DETAILS
Series:
Release Date:
7 August 1963
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 11 September 1963
Production Date:
began 25 April 1963
Copyright Claimant:
Alta Vista Productions
Copyright Date:
14 August 1963
Copyright Number:
LP26482
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Pathe Color
Widescreen/ratio
Panavision
Duration(in mins):
101
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Frankie takes his girl friend, Dolores, to a beach house in southern California for a surfing vacation. Upon arrival, he is dismayed to find a crowd of their friends there, invited by Dolores. From an adjoining house, their beach antics are observed by anthropology professor Robert O. Sutwell and his secretary, Marianne, who are doing research on the sex play of teenagers. Meanwhile, Frankie becomes angry with Dolores and plans to avenge himself by feigning a romance with voluptuous Ava, a Hungarian waitress at Big Daddy's, the local beer and rock and roll establishment. When the professor rescues Dolores from the unwelcome attentions of Eric Von Zipper, a leather-jacketed motorcyclist, they become friends, and Frankie becomes jealous. As the apparent romances develop, the teenagers discover the professor's research papers and realize what he is doing. At Big Daddy's, Professor Sutwell is confronted by the irate youngsters and the cyclists. An ensuing pie-throwing brawl finally clears up the misunderstandings; Frankie and Dolores reconcile, while Professor Sutwell realizes that Marianne is the woman for ... +


Frankie takes his girl friend, Dolores, to a beach house in southern California for a surfing vacation. Upon arrival, he is dismayed to find a crowd of their friends there, invited by Dolores. From an adjoining house, their beach antics are observed by anthropology professor Robert O. Sutwell and his secretary, Marianne, who are doing research on the sex play of teenagers. Meanwhile, Frankie becomes angry with Dolores and plans to avenge himself by feigning a romance with voluptuous Ava, a Hungarian waitress at Big Daddy's, the local beer and rock and roll establishment. When the professor rescues Dolores from the unwelcome attentions of Eric Von Zipper, a leather-jacketed motorcyclist, they become friends, and Frankie becomes jealous. As the apparent romances develop, the teenagers discover the professor's research papers and realize what he is doing. At Big Daddy's, Professor Sutwell is confronted by the irate youngsters and the cyclists. An ensuing pie-throwing brawl finally clears up the misunderstandings; Frankie and Dolores reconcile, while Professor Sutwell realizes that Marianne is the woman for him. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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