The War of the Gargantuas (1970)

93 mins | Science fiction | 1970

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HISTORY

Released in Japan in Aug 1966 as Furankenshutain no kaiju--Sanda tai Gailah . Intended as a sequel to Frankenstein Conquers the World , q. v., but the film was reedited by Saperstein, eliminating Frankenstein references and adding new footage. This version was released in Japan as Sanda tai Gailah ; running time: 88 ... More Less

Released in Japan in Aug 1966 as Furankenshutain no kaiju--Sanda tai Gailah . Intended as a sequel to Frankenstein Conquers the World , q. v., but the film was reedited by Saperstein, eliminating Frankenstein references and adding new footage. This version was released in Japan as Sanda tai Gailah ; running time: 88 min. More Less

CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
MUSIC
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Sanda tai Gailah
Furankenshutain no kaiju--Sanda tai Gailah
Premiere Information:
Houston opening: 29 July 1970
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Eastman Color
Widescreen/ratio
Tohoscope
Duration(in mins):
93
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Dr. Paul Stewart, an expert on unusual marine life, arrives in Japan to investigate a series of mysterious deaths off the coast of Kyoto involving a huge green creature. Another creature is seen, and Dr. Stewart deduces that, as a result of atomic bomb testing, a small creature he once studied has mutated into two gargantuas. The green gargantua, leaving its sea lair, terrorizes Tokyo before being knocked unconscious by lasers; the brown gargantua arrives from the mountains to rescue its brother as the army prepares to attack. Dr. Stewart warns the military commander not to use conventional weapons on the beasts for fear that their flesh might regenerate. The brown creature is unable to persuade the green gargantua to lead a peaceful existence; after a violent fight in the sea, the two are engulfed by an erupting ... +


Dr. Paul Stewart, an expert on unusual marine life, arrives in Japan to investigate a series of mysterious deaths off the coast of Kyoto involving a huge green creature. Another creature is seen, and Dr. Stewart deduces that, as a result of atomic bomb testing, a small creature he once studied has mutated into two gargantuas. The green gargantua, leaving its sea lair, terrorizes Tokyo before being knocked unconscious by lasers; the brown gargantua arrives from the mountains to rescue its brother as the army prepares to attack. Dr. Stewart warns the military commander not to use conventional weapons on the beasts for fear that their flesh might regenerate. The brown creature is unable to persuade the green gargantua to lead a peaceful existence; after a violent fight in the sea, the two are engulfed by an erupting volcano. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.