Dementia 13 (1963)

81 mins | Horror | 1963

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HISTORY

The 13 Aug 1962 DV announced the upcoming project, referred to by its working title, Dementia, to be produced by Roger Corman and directed by his production assistant, Francis Coppola, a recent winner of the Samuel Goldwyn Award. On 10 Sep 1962, LAT reported that filming began that day at Ardmore Studios in Bray, Ireland. Appearing in the film was Irish actor Pat McGee, for whom playwright Samuel Becket reportedly wrote Krapp’s Last Tape. Another addition to the cast was Sean O’Toole, as noted in the 13 Sep 1962 DV.
       In his 1996 book, Faster and Furiouser: The Revised and Fattened Fable of American International Pictures, author Mark Thomas McGee stated that Corman provided Coppola with a budget of $22,000, left over from another production. However, Coppola reportedly financed the picture with $20,000 he raised by preselling the European distribution rights.
       Dementia 13 opened in Los Angeles, CA, on a double bill with The Terror (1963, see entry) during the autumn of 1962, as evidenced by an advertisement in the 1 Oct 1963 LAT. Coppola participated in both productions. A review in the 28 Oct 1963 NYT noted that it was released as part of a double feature with "X"--The Man With X-Ray Eyes (1963, see entry), and described the cast as “unlucky.”
       The picture opened in Great Britain in 1964 as The Haunted and the Hunted. Although release information credited Roger Corman as producer, production information credited Charles Hannawalt and R. Wright ... More Less

The 13 Aug 1962 DV announced the upcoming project, referred to by its working title, Dementia, to be produced by Roger Corman and directed by his production assistant, Francis Coppola, a recent winner of the Samuel Goldwyn Award. On 10 Sep 1962, LAT reported that filming began that day at Ardmore Studios in Bray, Ireland. Appearing in the film was Irish actor Pat McGee, for whom playwright Samuel Becket reportedly wrote Krapp’s Last Tape. Another addition to the cast was Sean O’Toole, as noted in the 13 Sep 1962 DV.
       In his 1996 book, Faster and Furiouser: The Revised and Fattened Fable of American International Pictures, author Mark Thomas McGee stated that Corman provided Coppola with a budget of $22,000, left over from another production. However, Coppola reportedly financed the picture with $20,000 he raised by preselling the European distribution rights.
       Dementia 13 opened in Los Angeles, CA, on a double bill with The Terror (1963, see entry) during the autumn of 1962, as evidenced by an advertisement in the 1 Oct 1963 LAT. Coppola participated in both productions. A review in the 28 Oct 1963 NYT noted that it was released as part of a double feature with "X"--The Man With X-Ray Eyes (1963, see entry), and described the cast as “unlucky.”
       The picture opened in Great Britain in 1964 as The Haunted and the Hunted. Although release information credited Roger Corman as producer, production information credited Charles Hannawalt and R. Wright Campbell, with Corman as executive producer. William Cathcart was credited as photographer only in production material.
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
LOCATION
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
13 Aug 1962
---
Daily Variety
13 Sep 1962
---
Los Angeles Times
10 Sep 1962
---
Los Angeles Times
1 Oct 1963
---
New York Times
28 Oct 1963
---
Video Watchdog
Mar-Apr 1991
p. 48.
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
The Haunted and the Hunted
Dementia
Release Date:
1963
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: September 1963
Production Date:
began 10 September 1962
Duration(in mins):
81
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In Ireland, near the Haloran family castle, John Haloran and his wife, Louise, argue over the will of the family's half-crazed matriarch, Lady Haloran. In the heat of the argument, John dies of a heart attack. Louise, whose primary concern is to gain control of the family wealth, conceals his death, fearing that she will not receive his inheritance. The Halorans, including Billy, Richard, and Richard's fiancée, Kane, gather for a memorial ceremony at the gravesite of Kathleen, their sister who was drowned in a nearby lake eight years earlier. Meanwhile, the scheming Louise plots to drive Lady Haloran insane by making her believe that she can communicate with the dead child. Before she can carry out her plan, however, Louise is brutally axed to death. Justin Caleb, the sinister family doctor, becomes suspicious of everyone, and after Lady Haloran is found murdered, he orders the lake drained. When a wax statue of Kathleen is discovered, Billy appears, brandishing an axe, but he is overcome and killed. It is revealed that Billy, a homicidal maniac, was also responsible for his sister's ... +


In Ireland, near the Haloran family castle, John Haloran and his wife, Louise, argue over the will of the family's half-crazed matriarch, Lady Haloran. In the heat of the argument, John dies of a heart attack. Louise, whose primary concern is to gain control of the family wealth, conceals his death, fearing that she will not receive his inheritance. The Halorans, including Billy, Richard, and Richard's fiancée, Kane, gather for a memorial ceremony at the gravesite of Kathleen, their sister who was drowned in a nearby lake eight years earlier. Meanwhile, the scheming Louise plots to drive Lady Haloran insane by making her believe that she can communicate with the dead child. Before she can carry out her plan, however, Louise is brutally axed to death. Justin Caleb, the sinister family doctor, becomes suspicious of everyone, and after Lady Haloran is found murdered, he orders the lake drained. When a wax statue of Kathleen is discovered, Billy appears, brandishing an axe, but he is overcome and killed. It is revealed that Billy, a homicidal maniac, was also responsible for his sister's death. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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