Ambush Bay (1966)

109 mins | Melodrama | 31 August 1966

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HISTORY

Ambush Bay marked television director Ron Winston’s theatrical feature film debut.
       The casting of Hugh O’Brian, who had formerly served as a U.S. Marine, was announced in the 24 May 1965 LAT, which noted that filming would begin in fall 1965. Location scouting took place on the island of Luzon in the Philippines in early Aug 1965, as noted in an 11 Aug 1965 DV item. A 10 Nov 1965 Var production chart confirmed that principal photography began on 15 Oct 1965 in Manila. Other locations included the jungles surrounding Mount Makiling, an extinct volcano, the 2 Nov 1965 DV reported.
       In mid-Nov 1965, Hugh O’Brian was injured while filming a scene in a rice paddy in the Laguna Province. The 23 Nov 1965 DV explained that a “frightened water buffalo” had gored the actor, resulting in “two cracked ribs, internal bleeding and contusions.” O’Brian did not require surgery, and was scheduled to be released from Doctors Hospital in Manila by 28 Nov 1965. Soon after, the 8 Dec 1965 Var indicated that filming would be completed that week. Afterward, O’Brian was due to travel to Vietnam for a three-week USO tour.
       A world premiere and several local premieres were set to be sponsored by the U.S. Marines, according to a 22 Apr 1966 DV brief, which noted that the Marines would sell tickets and promote the events, as well as supplying bands and color guard.
       Following positive critical reception, the 13 Oct 1966 DV reported that United Artists (UA) planned to produce a television series based ... More Less

Ambush Bay marked television director Ron Winston’s theatrical feature film debut.
       The casting of Hugh O’Brian, who had formerly served as a U.S. Marine, was announced in the 24 May 1965 LAT, which noted that filming would begin in fall 1965. Location scouting took place on the island of Luzon in the Philippines in early Aug 1965, as noted in an 11 Aug 1965 DV item. A 10 Nov 1965 Var production chart confirmed that principal photography began on 15 Oct 1965 in Manila. Other locations included the jungles surrounding Mount Makiling, an extinct volcano, the 2 Nov 1965 DV reported.
       In mid-Nov 1965, Hugh O’Brian was injured while filming a scene in a rice paddy in the Laguna Province. The 23 Nov 1965 DV explained that a “frightened water buffalo” had gored the actor, resulting in “two cracked ribs, internal bleeding and contusions.” O’Brian did not require surgery, and was scheduled to be released from Doctors Hospital in Manila by 28 Nov 1965. Soon after, the 8 Dec 1965 Var indicated that filming would be completed that week. Afterward, O’Brian was due to travel to Vietnam for a three-week USO tour.
       A world premiere and several local premieres were set to be sponsored by the U.S. Marines, according to a 22 Apr 1966 DV brief, which noted that the Marines would sell tickets and promote the events, as well as supplying bands and color guard.
       Following positive critical reception, the 13 Oct 1966 DV reported that United Artists (UA) planned to produce a television series based on the film, with James Mitchum (“Pfc. James Grenier”) in a starring role.
       Although Steve Fisher was named as screenwriter in the 29 May 1963 Var, and as co-screenwriter with Ib Melchior in the 28 Apr 1965 DV, he did not receive onscreen credit. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
28 Apr 1965
p. 3.
Daily Variety
11 Aug 1965
p. 2.
Daily Variety
2 Nov 1965
p. 2.
Daily Variety
23 Nov 1965
p. 15.
Daily Variety
22 Apr 1966
p. 4.
Daily Variety
31 Aug 1966
p. 3.
Daily Variety
13 Oct 1966
p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
24 May 1965
Section C, p. 20.
Los Angeles Times
30 Jul 1965
Section D, p. 11.
Los Angeles Times
25 Sep 1966
Section M, p. 12.
Los Angeles Times
29 Sep 1966
Section D, p. 18.
New York Times
14 Sep 1966
p. 53.
New York Times
15 Sep 1966
p. 51.
Variety
29 May 1963
p. 7.
Variety
10 Nov 1965
p. 22.
Variety
8 Dec 1965
p. 21.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Schenck-Zabel Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
Exec prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
FILM EDITOR
MUSIC
Mus comp & cond
SOUND
Sd eff ed
Music ed
VISUAL EFFECTS
Photog eff
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
DETAILS
Release Date:
31 August 1966
Premiere Information:
Baltimore opening: 31 August 1966
New York opening: 14 September 1966
Los Angeles opening: 28 September 1966
Production Date:
15 October--early December 1965
Copyright Claimant:
Courageous Films
Copyright Date:
9 May 1966
Copyright Number:
LP32948
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
De Luxe
Duration(in mins):
109
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Nine U.S. Marines land secretly on a Philippine island in 1944 on a mission to contact a spy who has information to convey concerning General MacArthur's planned invasion of the islands. First Sergeant Steve Corey takes charge of the group when their captain is killed. The patrol fights its way through the Japanese defenses, and only five Marines remain when they finally arrive at their destination and rescue the spy, Miyazaki, a Japanese-American woman, from the enemy. Miyazaki reveals that the Japanese have learned MacArthur's planned invasion route and have mined the bay he will use; but the group's radio has been destroyed, and they are unable to communicate this intelligence. Sergeant Ernest Wartell stays behind to hold off an enemy patrol, which he destroys at the cost of his own life, as the survivors, Corey and Pfc. James Grenier, set out with Miyazaki to detonate the mines. Miyazaki sacrifices herself to save her companions from the Japanese, and the mission is a success, though Corey is killed. Grenier escapes in time to hear the MacArthur radio broadcast: "People of the Philippines, I have ... +


Nine U.S. Marines land secretly on a Philippine island in 1944 on a mission to contact a spy who has information to convey concerning General MacArthur's planned invasion of the islands. First Sergeant Steve Corey takes charge of the group when their captain is killed. The patrol fights its way through the Japanese defenses, and only five Marines remain when they finally arrive at their destination and rescue the spy, Miyazaki, a Japanese-American woman, from the enemy. Miyazaki reveals that the Japanese have learned MacArthur's planned invasion route and have mined the bay he will use; but the group's radio has been destroyed, and they are unable to communicate this intelligence. Sergeant Ernest Wartell stays behind to hold off an enemy patrol, which he destroys at the cost of his own life, as the survivors, Corey and Pfc. James Grenier, set out with Miyazaki to detonate the mines. Miyazaki sacrifices herself to save her companions from the Japanese, and the mission is a success, though Corey is killed. Grenier escapes in time to hear the MacArthur radio broadcast: "People of the Philippines, I have returned." +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.