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HISTORY

Judgment was the working title for this picture. A 29 Jun 1918 Motion Picture News item indicated that filming would begin that week, or shortly thereafter, at Metro Pictures Corp.’s studio in Hollywood, CA. Location shooting took place on the Letts Estate in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles, CA, according to the 13 Jul 1918 Motography. For a scene in which “Dr. John O’Neill” crashes an automobile through a wooden barrier, actor Franklyn Farnum performed the stunt, himself, as noted in the 13 Jul 1918 Moving Picture World.
       Items in the 6 Jul 1918 Motography and Motion Picture News identified A. Dorris as director Will S. Davis’s assistant during the shoot. ...

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Judgment was the working title for this picture. A 29 Jun 1918 Motion Picture News item indicated that filming would begin that week, or shortly thereafter, at Metro Pictures Corp.’s studio in Hollywood, CA. Location shooting took place on the Letts Estate in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles, CA, according to the 13 Jul 1918 Motography. For a scene in which “Dr. John O’Neill” crashes an automobile through a wooden barrier, actor Franklyn Farnum performed the stunt, himself, as noted in the 13 Jul 1918 Moving Picture World.
       Items in the 6 Jul 1918 Motography and Motion Picture News identified A. Dorris as director Will S. Davis’s assistant during the shoot.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Herald and Motography
31 Aug 1918
p. 37
Exhibitors Trade Review
17 Aug 1918
p. 882
Exhibitors Trade Review
24 Aug 1918
p. 1015
Motion Picture Magazine
Dec 1918
p. 122
Motion Picture News
29 Jun 1918
p. 3920
Motion Picture News
6 Jul 1918
p. 95
Motion Picture News
6 Jul 1918
p. 109
Motion Picture News
24 Aug 1918
p. 1214
Motion Picture News
24 Aug 1918
p. 1263
Motography
6 Jul 1918
p. 42
Motography
13 Jul 1918
p. 50
Moving Picture World
6 Jul 1918
p. 92
Moving Picture World
13 Jul 1918
p. 230
Moving Picture World
3 Aug 1918
p. 701
Moving Picture World
17 Aug 1918
p. 1019
Moving Picture World
24 Aug 1918
p. 1154
NYDM
7 Sep 1918
p. 371
Variety
30 Aug 1918
p. 38
Wid's Daily
19 Aug 1918
---
Wid's Daily
25 Aug 1918
pp. 23-24
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Judgment
Release Date:
12 August 1918
Production Date:
late Jun--late Jul or early Aug 1918
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Metro Pictures Corp.
13 August 1918
LP12748
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Mary Manners, a debutante, has inherited the power of mind reading from her gypsy ancestors. She purchases a new automobile, and while driving on a lonely country road, she is attacked by a robber. Dr. John O'Neill rescues her. As she regains consciousness, she identifies John by name and predicts that he will solve a mystery surrounding his parentage. The two quickly become friends and a romance develops. John, who has received financial support from his father but does not know his identity, attends a party at Mary's home. There, he meets Judge Brainard, who plans for Mary to marry his son, Robert. When Robert jealously complains of John’s presence, the judge confesses that John is his son by a former marriage. A man named Andrew Vail overhears the conversation and threatens to blackmail Judge Brainard. In a fierce struggle, Brainard pushes Andrew over a cliff; however, John is arrested for the crime on circumstantial evidence. Presiding over the trial, Judge Brainard maintains his silence as the jury pronounces John guilty. Yet, when he looks into the knowing eyes of Mary, who has read his mind, he breaks down and confesses guilt. Because he acted in self-defense, the judge is acquitted, whereupon he takes John into his heart. Subsequently, John and Mary are ...

More Less

Mary Manners, a debutante, has inherited the power of mind reading from her gypsy ancestors. She purchases a new automobile, and while driving on a lonely country road, she is attacked by a robber. Dr. John O'Neill rescues her. As she regains consciousness, she identifies John by name and predicts that he will solve a mystery surrounding his parentage. The two quickly become friends and a romance develops. John, who has received financial support from his father but does not know his identity, attends a party at Mary's home. There, he meets Judge Brainard, who plans for Mary to marry his son, Robert. When Robert jealously complains of John’s presence, the judge confesses that John is his son by a former marriage. A man named Andrew Vail overhears the conversation and threatens to blackmail Judge Brainard. In a fierce struggle, Brainard pushes Andrew over a cliff; however, John is arrested for the crime on circumstantial evidence. Presiding over the trial, Judge Brainard maintains his silence as the jury pronounces John guilty. Yet, when he looks into the knowing eyes of Mary, who has read his mind, he breaks down and confesses guilt. Because he acted in self-defense, the judge is acquitted, whereupon he takes John into his heart. Subsequently, John and Mary are wed.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.