Spinout (1966)

93 mins | Comedy | 23 November 1966

Director:

Norman Taurog

Producer:

Joe Pasternak

Cinematographer:

Daniel L. Fapp

Editor:

Rita Roland

Production Designers:

George W. Davis, Edward Carfagno

Production Company:

Euterpe, Inc.
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HISTORY

The 15 Feb 1966 DV announced that the title of Elvis Presley’s next Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) had been changed from Never Say Yes to Spinout. According to the 21 Feb 1966 DV, principal photography began that day in Los Angeles, CA. Army Archerd reported in his 1 Mar 1966 DV column that Presley’s salary was $1 million of the film $2.2 million budget, and that he was scheduled to sing nine songs. Spinout was Presley’s sixth film with veteran director Norman Taurog, his seventh for MGM, and his third scheduled for a 1966 release.
       A production chart in the 23 Feb 1966 Var noted that actor Woody Woodbury was co-starring in Spinout, but he was not in the final production.
       Filming moved to Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles’s Chavez Ravine, where a scene required two hundred extras, twenty-eight supporting actors, fifty automobiles, and twelve custom racing cars, the 11 Mar 1966 DV reported. Radio personality Jay Jasin was hired to be the race announcer.
       According to the 1 Apr 1966 DV, the production had moved that day to the Veteran’s Building in Culver City, CA, to film the last of Elvis Presley’s nine musical numbers. He had completed the recordings two weeks earlier, the 17 Mar 1966 DV noted, including “Spinout” and “All That I Am,” the songs on RCA Victor’s upcoming single from the Spinout soundtrack album.
Filming was completed 7 Apr 1966, the next day’s DV noted.
       MGM announced that it had ordered 500 prints of Spinout, the “largest ...
More Less

The 15 Feb 1966 DV announced that the title of Elvis Presley’s next Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) had been changed from Never Say Yes to Spinout. According to the 21 Feb 1966 DV, principal photography began that day in Los Angeles, CA. Army Archerd reported in his 1 Mar 1966 DV column that Presley’s salary was $1 million of the film $2.2 million budget, and that he was scheduled to sing nine songs. Spinout was Presley’s sixth film with veteran director Norman Taurog, his seventh for MGM, and his third scheduled for a 1966 release.
       A production chart in the 23 Feb 1966 Var noted that actor Woody Woodbury was co-starring in Spinout, but he was not in the final production.
       Filming moved to Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles’s Chavez Ravine, where a scene required two hundred extras, twenty-eight supporting actors, fifty automobiles, and twelve custom racing cars, the 11 Mar 1966 DV reported. Radio personality Jay Jasin was hired to be the race announcer.
       According to the 1 Apr 1966 DV, the production had moved that day to the Veteran’s Building in Culver City, CA, to film the last of Elvis Presley’s nine musical numbers. He had completed the recordings two weeks earlier, the 17 Mar 1966 DV noted, including “Spinout” and “All That I Am,” the songs on RCA Victor’s upcoming single from the Spinout soundtrack album.
Filming was completed 7 Apr 1966, the next day’s DV noted.
       MGM announced that it had ordered 500 prints of Spinout, the “largest number for any Elvis Presley film in MGM history, the 6 Oct 1966 DV reported. The film went into general release on 12 Oct 1966, and opened in the Los Angeles, CA, area on 23 Nov 1966. A full-page advertisement in that day’s LAT showed Spinout at the top of a dozen double bills in Southern California, screening with second-run movies The Bounty Killer (1965, see entry), The Liquidator (1966, see entry), and, in one case, the Beatles’ 1965 film, Help (see entry). The 15 Dec 1966 NYT review of the film mentioned that it had opened in the New York City area the day before on a double bill with a French-Italian film called Marco the Magnificent. LAT critic Kevin Thomas called Spinout “perhaps [Elvis’s] best picture yet,” and lauded the cast as “first-rate.” The NYT review mentioned that the Spinout double bill “landed heavily,” and deemed the “package…neither a bargain no a colorful Christmas bauble.”
       A “Big Rental Pictures of 1966” roundup in the 4 Jan 1967 Var listed Spinout as having grossed almost $1.8 million in its first two-and-a-half months of release.
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
15 Feb 1966
p. 12.
Daily Variety
18 Feb 1966
p. 10.
Daily Variety
21 Feb 1966
p. 4.
Daily Variety
1 Mar 1966
p. 2.
Daily Variety
11 Mar 1966
p. 3.
Daily Variety
14 Mar 1966
p. 3.
Daily Variety
17 Mar 1966
p. 4.
Daily Variety
1 Apr 1966
p. 3.
Daily Variety
8 Apr 1966
p. 2.
Daily Variety
6 Oct 1966
p. 5.
Daily Variety
14 Oct 1966
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
23 Nov 1966
Section C, p. 10.
Los Angeles Times
25 Nov 1966
Section D, p. 30.
New York Times
15 Dec 1966
p. 60.
Variety
23 Feb 1966
p. 27.
Variety
4 Jan 1967
p. 8.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer presents
A Joe Pasternak Production
A Euterpe Picture
Presented by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Cam asst
Best boy
Best boy
Dolly grip
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Asst ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
Prop master
2d prop man
COSTUMES
2d ward man
MUSIC
[Mus] assoc
Vocal background
SOUND
Rec supv
Mixer
Boom op
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec visual eff
Spec visual eff
Spec eff
DANCE
Mus numbers staged by
MAKEUP
Hairstylist
Makeup
Hairstyles
Hairstyles
Makeup asst
PRODUCTION MISC
Dial supv
Tech adv
Scr supv
Stills
Gaffer
Key grip
Craft service
SOURCES
SONGS
"Stop Look and Listen," words and music by Joy Byers
"Adam and Evil," words and music by Fred Wise and Randy Starr
"All That I Am," words and music by Sid Tepper and Roy C. Bennett
+
SONGS
"Stop Look and Listen," words and music by Joy Byers
"Adam and Evil," words and music by Fred Wise and Randy Starr
"All That I Am," words and music by Sid Tepper and Roy C. Bennett
"Am I Ready," words and music by Sid Tepper and Roy C. Bennett
"Smorgasbord," words and music by Sid Tepper and Roy C. Bennett
"Never Say Yes," words and music by Doc Pomus and Mort Shuman
"Beach Shack," words and music by Bill Giant, Florence Kaye and Bernie Baum
"I'll Be Back," words and music by Sid Wayne and Ben Weisman
"Spinout," words and music by Sid Wayne, Ben Weisman and Dolores Fuller
all songs sung by Elvis Presley and The Jordanaires.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Never Say Yes
Release Date:
23 November 1966
Premiere Information:
Released: 12 Oct 1966; Los Angeles opening: 23 Nov 1966; New York opening: 14 Dec 1966
Production Date:
21 Feb -- 7 Apr 1966
Copyright Claimant:
Euterpe, Inc.
Copyright Date:
27 July 1966
Copyright Number:
LP33273
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex Recording System
Color
In Metrocolor®
Widescreen/ratio
Panavision
Duration(in mins):
93
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Singer Mike McCoy is head of a touring combo, which suits him perfectly since he has no intention of marrying. In Santa Barbara, however, he becomes involved with three females eager to change his single status. First, there is his drummer Les, who resents his treating her as "one of the boys." Then there is Cynthia Foxhugh, the daughter of a millionaire car manufacturer who wants Mike to drive for her father in the Santa Fe Road Race. Finally there is Diana St. Clair, who has selected Mike as the model for a book she is writing on the perfect American male. Annoyed by Cynthia's overbearing father, Mike wins the Santa Fe race by driving his own sports car. At the party following the event, he learns that all three girls are tired of waiting for him to marry; Les is in love with a young policeman, Cynthia has decided to marry her father's assistant, and Diana announces that she soon will be Cynthia's stepmother. Mike remains free of romantic entanglements, except for Susan, his new ... +


Singer Mike McCoy is head of a touring combo, which suits him perfectly since he has no intention of marrying. In Santa Barbara, however, he becomes involved with three females eager to change his single status. First, there is his drummer Les, who resents his treating her as "one of the boys." Then there is Cynthia Foxhugh, the daughter of a millionaire car manufacturer who wants Mike to drive for her father in the Santa Fe Road Race. Finally there is Diana St. Clair, who has selected Mike as the model for a book she is writing on the perfect American male. Annoyed by Cynthia's overbearing father, Mike wins the Santa Fe race by driving his own sports car. At the party following the event, he learns that all three girls are tired of waiting for him to marry; Les is in love with a young policeman, Cynthia has decided to marry her father's assistant, and Diana announces that she soon will be Cynthia's stepmother. Mike remains free of romantic entanglements, except for Susan, his new drummer. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.