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HISTORY

According to a 20 Jul 1960 Var production chart, principal photography began two days earlier at Saga Film Studios in Copenhagen, Denmark.
       On 26 Apr 1961, Var stated that production was recently completed for both the English and Danish versions, the latter of which had already screened at Saga’s theater in Copenhagen. Two months later, however, the 29 Jun 1961 DV revealed that distributor American International Pictures (AIP) was suing producer Sidney Pink, affiliates Barnet Shapiro, Marshal H. Sevin, Leo Bertelsen, Hans Barfod, Cinemagic, Inc., and fifty unidentified parties for “fraud, breach and reformation of contract.” In their $1.53 million lawsuit, AIP executives alleged that Pink had not yet made a final edit of the picture, and had only delivered portions of the “raw negative,” all of which was required by 1 Dec 1960 for a summer 1961 release. The plaintiffs described the film’s dialogue as “Danish-English,” implying a violation of Pink’s agreement to cast only American actors in lead roles. The article noted that AIP had worldwide distribution rights, with the exceptions of Scandinavia, Greenland, Switzerland, Austria, and Iceland. The company also claimed music rights, which Pink had refused to release. The 24 Jul 1961 DV reported that Pink filed a $250,000 suit against AIP and Monarch Books, Inc., over a novelization of his screenplay, which allegedly contained “passages of ‘a lewd, lascivious and wanton nature.’” Pink also claimed damages to his “professional reputation,” including the unauthorized use of his name in connection with the book. An article in the 24 Oct 1961 DV stated that editing of ...

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According to a 20 Jul 1960 Var production chart, principal photography began two days earlier at Saga Film Studios in Copenhagen, Denmark.
       On 26 Apr 1961, Var stated that production was recently completed for both the English and Danish versions, the latter of which had already screened at Saga’s theater in Copenhagen. Two months later, however, the 29 Jun 1961 DV revealed that distributor American International Pictures (AIP) was suing producer Sidney Pink, affiliates Barnet Shapiro, Marshal H. Sevin, Leo Bertelsen, Hans Barfod, Cinemagic, Inc., and fifty unidentified parties for “fraud, breach and reformation of contract.” In their $1.53 million lawsuit, AIP executives alleged that Pink had not yet made a final edit of the picture, and had only delivered portions of the “raw negative,” all of which was required by 1 Dec 1960 for a summer 1961 release. The plaintiffs described the film’s dialogue as “Danish-English,” implying a violation of Pink’s agreement to cast only American actors in lead roles. The article noted that AIP had worldwide distribution rights, with the exceptions of Scandinavia, Greenland, Switzerland, Austria, and Iceland. The company also claimed music rights, which Pink had refused to release. The 24 Jul 1961 DV reported that Pink filed a $250,000 suit against AIP and Monarch Books, Inc., over a novelization of his screenplay, which allegedly contained “passages of ‘a lewd, lascivious and wanton nature.’” Pink also claimed damages to his “professional reputation,” including the unauthorized use of his name in connection with the book. An article in the 24 Oct 1961 DV stated that editing of the picture was postponed “pending litigation.” Nearly a year later, the 15 Oct 1962 DV reported that Lee Millar was providing the English-language voice of the film’s “romantic lead.”
       Reptilicus opened 28 Nov 1962 in Seattle, WA, and Cincinnati, OH, as indicated by 5 Dec 1962 Var box-office reports. The Los Angeles, CA, opening followed on 16 Jan 1963. A review in the 18 Jan 1963 LAT suggested that the picture “may extract a few screams from the kids.”
       U. S. sources credit Pink as producer-director and Mehling as editor, while a Danish source credits Bang as director and Nielsen as editor. Actor Poul Wøldike is credited by U. S. sources as Poul Wildaker.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
PERSONAL & COMPANY INDEX CREDITS
CREDIT
HISTORY CREDITS
CREDIT TYPE
CREDIT
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
13 Jul 1960
p. 3
Daily Variety
29 Jun 1961
p. 1, 4
Daily Variety
24 Jul 1961
p. 3
Daily Variety
24 Oct 1961
p. 83
Daily Variety
15 Oct 1962
p. 4
Daily Variety
22 Jan 1963
p. 3
Los Angeles Times
20 Jul 1960
Section A, p. 8
Los Angeles Times
8 Nov 1960
p. 18
Los Angeles Times
11 Jan 1963
Section C, p. 10
Los Angeles Times
18 Jan 1963
Section D, p. 8
Variety
20 Jul 1960
p. 22
Variety
26 Apr 1961
p. 151
Variety
5 Dec 1962
p. 10
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Sidney Pink Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
WRITERS
Adpt
Danish adpt
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Editing (see note)
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
Set dec
MUSIC
Mus comp & cond
SOUND
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod supv
DETAILS
Release Date:
28 November 1962
Premiere Information:
Seattle and Cincinnati openings: 28 Nov 1962; Los Angeles opening: 16 Jan 1963
Production Date:
began 18 Jul 1960
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Saga Film
21 November 1962
LP23589
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Pathécolor
Duration(in mins):
81
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Danish engineers drilling for minerals in Lapland find the tail of a prehistoric beast and send it to the distinguished Professor Martens in Copenhagen. The door of the refrigerated room in which the remains are stored is accidentally left ajar, and the rise in temperature enables the tail to grow new tissue. American Gen. Mark Grayson of the United Nations arrives in Copenhagen to maintain an alert on the creature, which continues to regenerate itself and grows to an enormous size. Though the general undertakes the mission reluctantly, he becomes attracted to the professor's daughters, Lise and Karen. One night, the monster escapes into the forest and begins to terrorize the countryside. The armed forces fail in their efforts to combat the monster with conventional weapons. A flamethrower forces the creature into the ocean, and a depth charge severs one of its feet, but the creature returns to wreak destruction on Copenhagen. As a last resort, a deadly narcotic is fired into its mouth with a rocket. Though the monster appears to have been destroyed, its severed foot begins the process of ...

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Danish engineers drilling for minerals in Lapland find the tail of a prehistoric beast and send it to the distinguished Professor Martens in Copenhagen. The door of the refrigerated room in which the remains are stored is accidentally left ajar, and the rise in temperature enables the tail to grow new tissue. American Gen. Mark Grayson of the United Nations arrives in Copenhagen to maintain an alert on the creature, which continues to regenerate itself and grows to an enormous size. Though the general undertakes the mission reluctantly, he becomes attracted to the professor's daughters, Lise and Karen. One night, the monster escapes into the forest and begins to terrorize the countryside. The armed forces fail in their efforts to combat the monster with conventional weapons. A flamethrower forces the creature into the ocean, and a depth charge severs one of its feet, but the creature returns to wreak destruction on Copenhagen. As a last resort, a deadly narcotic is fired into its mouth with a rocket. Though the monster appears to have been destroyed, its severed foot begins the process of regeneration.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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