Tickle Me (1965)

90 mins | Comedy-drama | 3 June 1965

Director:

Norman Taurog

Producer:

Ben Schwalb

Cinematographer:

Loyal Griggs

Editor:

Archie Marshek

Production Designers:

Hal Pereira, Arthur Lonergan

Production Company:

Allied Artists
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HISTORY

The 10 Aug 1964 DV reported that the upcoming Allied Artists Pictures Corporation (AA) production would take place at Paramount Studios in Oct 1964, with possible location shooting in Arizona. Star Elvis Presley, who signed a “one-picture deal” with AA, was expected to perform as many as twelve songs in the film. Principal photography began 12 Oct 1964, as reported two days later in Var.
       The 8 Oct 1964 LAT attributed the title to Presley’s manager, “Colonel” Tom Parker, who reportedly had a stake in the production. The article also claimed that producer Ben Schwalb cast model Jocelyn Lane after seeing her photograph in a magazine. According to the 11 Nov 1964 Var, Tickle Me was Schwalb’s fiftieth and final picture for AA. He went into independent production the following year.
       A news item in the 22 Sep 1964 DV noted that choreographer David Winters was dividing his working hours between the film and his weekly television show, Shindig! (ABC, 16 Sep 1964--8 Jan 1966). On 21 Oct 1964, however, DV stated that Winters quit the program to devote his attention to the film.
       The 6 Nov 1964 DV reported that production was completed three days earlier, in keeping with the planned twenty-two-day shooting schedule. Composer Walter Scharf began recording the musical score with a fifty-piece orchestra on 31 Dec 1964, as noted in that day’s DV.
       According to the 19 May 1965 Var, AA publicist Harry Goldstein was planning a “saturation” campaign for the ... More Less

The 10 Aug 1964 DV reported that the upcoming Allied Artists Pictures Corporation (AA) production would take place at Paramount Studios in Oct 1964, with possible location shooting in Arizona. Star Elvis Presley, who signed a “one-picture deal” with AA, was expected to perform as many as twelve songs in the film. Principal photography began 12 Oct 1964, as reported two days later in Var.
       The 8 Oct 1964 LAT attributed the title to Presley’s manager, “Colonel” Tom Parker, who reportedly had a stake in the production. The article also claimed that producer Ben Schwalb cast model Jocelyn Lane after seeing her photograph in a magazine. According to the 11 Nov 1964 Var, Tickle Me was Schwalb’s fiftieth and final picture for AA. He went into independent production the following year.
       A news item in the 22 Sep 1964 DV noted that choreographer David Winters was dividing his working hours between the film and his weekly television show, Shindig! (ABC, 16 Sep 1964--8 Jan 1966). On 21 Oct 1964, however, DV stated that Winters quit the program to devote his attention to the film.
       The 6 Nov 1964 DV reported that production was completed three days earlier, in keeping with the planned twenty-two-day shooting schedule. Composer Walter Scharf began recording the musical score with a fifty-piece orchestra on 31 Dec 1964, as noted in that day’s DV.
       According to the 19 May 1965 Var, AA publicist Harry Goldstein was planning a “saturation” campaign for the 3 Jun 1965 premiere in Atlanta, GA. Tickle Me opened 23 Jun 1965 in New York City, and on 14 Jul 1965 in Los Angeles, CA. Reviews were not enthusiastic, although the 16 Jul 1965 LAT commended Norman Taurog for his ability to overcome “low budget and trite material.”
       The 23 Jun 1965 Var revealed that AA, which had suffered recent losses of $1,512,000 and a $4 million reduction in gross income, was gambling on the film to remedy its financial troubles. On 28 Jul 1965, Var reported earnings of $1,028,000, with anticipated rentals of at least $3 million, and projected gross receipts of nearly $5 million, making Tickle Me the third most successful release in the company’s history. Months later, the 4 Mar 1966 LAT reported that readers of the trade magazine, Independent Film Journal, included the picture among the ten most profitable releases of 1965. Presley’s performance won him a 1966 Laurel Award.
       A news brief in the 11 Nov 1964 DV noted that the soundtrack album contained no new material, but was instead comprised of nine songs recorded by Presley over the previous three years. An additional track, “Blue Christmas,” was recorded in 1957.
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
10 Aug 1964
p. 2.
Daily Variety
22 Sep 1964
p. 4.
Daily Variety
21 Oct 1964
p. 11.
Daily Variety
4 Nov 1964
p. 4.
Daily Variety
6 Nov 1964
p. 2.
Daily Variety
11 Nov 1964
p. 4, 10.
Daily Variety
31 Dec 1964
p. 2.
Daily Variety
15 Jun 1965
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
8 Oct 1964
Section D, p. 14.
Los Angeles Times
10 Nov 1964
Section D, p. 13.
Los Angeles Times
11 Jul 1965
Section A, p. 5.
Los Angeles Times
16 Jul 1965
Section C, p. 13.
Los Angeles Times
23 Jul 1965
Section C, p. 13.
Los Angeles Times
4 Mar 1966
Section C, p. 20.
Los Angeles Times
20 Oct 1966
Section D, p. 18.
New York Times
24 Jun 1965
p. 28.
Variety
14 Oct 1964
p. 24.
Variety
11 Nov 1964
p. 4.
Variety
19 May 1965
p. 26.
Variety
23 Jun 1965
p. 5.
Variety
28 Jul 1965
p. 3.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Cam op
Asst cam op
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Props
Props
COSTUMES
Cost des
MUSIC
Mus dir
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Hairdresser
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Scr supv
Dial coach
COLOR PERSONNEL
[Col by]
SOURCES
SONGS
"(It's a) Long Lonely Highway" and "Night Rider," words and music by Doc Pomus and Mort Shuman
"It Feels So Right," words and music by Benjamin Weisman and Fred Wise
"Dirty Dirty Feeling" (English version of "Si seulement!") words and music by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller
+
SONGS
"(It's a) Long Lonely Highway" and "Night Rider," words and music by Doc Pomus and Mort Shuman
"It Feels So Right," words and music by Benjamin Weisman and Fred Wise
"Dirty Dirty Feeling" (English version of "Si seulement!") words and music by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller
"(Such an) Easy Question," words and music by Otis Blackwell and Winfield Scott
"Put the Blame on Me," words and music by Norman Blagman, Kathleen Twomey and Fred Wise
"I'm Yours," words and music by Don Robertson and Hal Blair
"I Feel That I've Known You Forever," words and music by Doc Pomus and Alan Jeffreys
"Slowly but Surely," words and music by Sid Wayne and Benjamin Weisman
all songs sung by Elvis Presley.
+
PERFORMER
DETAILS
Release Date:
3 June 1965
Premiere Information:
Atlanta opening: 3 June 1965
New York opening: 23 June 1965
Los Angeles opening: 14 July 1965
Production Date:
12 October--3 November 1964
Copyright Claimant:
Allied Artists
Copyright Date:
11 April 1965
Copyright Number:
LP33580
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Eastman Color
Widescreen/ratio
Panavision
Duration(in mins):
90
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Rodeo rider Lonnie Beale, a handsome singer, is employed by Vera Radford, proprietress of a dude ranch and beauty spa. Although he is befriended by handyman Stanley Potter, Lonnie arouses the jealousy of swimming instructor Brad Bentley. Despite her suspicion that Lonnie is a fortune hunter, physical education teacher Pam Merritt falls in love with him. Pam is the victim of repeated abduction attempts, which, she is informed by Deputy Sheriff Sturdivant, are inspired by her possession of a map of buried treasure. When she sees Lonnie kissing Vera, Pam breaks up with him, refusing to listen to his explanations. Back on the rodeo circuit, Lonnie finds himself preoccupied with Pam and is convinced by Stanley to return to her. He and Stanley locate Pam in Silverado, a restored ghost town and site of the treasure. During a night spent in a wax museum, the trio is assaulted by a procession of monsters, who are revealed to be Adolf, the ranch chef; Jerry, the groom; Henry, the gardener; and Deputy Sheriff Sturdivant. In the confrontation, the treasure is discovered. Assisted by Brad, Lonnie subdues the intruders. After a wedding at the ranch, Lonnie and Pam drive off, with Stanley trapped in a washtub he has tied to their ... +


Rodeo rider Lonnie Beale, a handsome singer, is employed by Vera Radford, proprietress of a dude ranch and beauty spa. Although he is befriended by handyman Stanley Potter, Lonnie arouses the jealousy of swimming instructor Brad Bentley. Despite her suspicion that Lonnie is a fortune hunter, physical education teacher Pam Merritt falls in love with him. Pam is the victim of repeated abduction attempts, which, she is informed by Deputy Sheriff Sturdivant, are inspired by her possession of a map of buried treasure. When she sees Lonnie kissing Vera, Pam breaks up with him, refusing to listen to his explanations. Back on the rodeo circuit, Lonnie finds himself preoccupied with Pam and is convinced by Stanley to return to her. He and Stanley locate Pam in Silverado, a restored ghost town and site of the treasure. During a night spent in a wax museum, the trio is assaulted by a procession of monsters, who are revealed to be Adolf, the ranch chef; Jerry, the groom; Henry, the gardener; and Deputy Sheriff Sturdivant. In the confrontation, the treasure is discovered. Assisted by Brad, Lonnie subdues the intruders. After a wedding at the ranch, Lonnie and Pam drive off, with Stanley trapped in a washtub he has tied to their car. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.