Air Patrol (1962)

70 mins | Melodrama | June 1962

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HISTORY

The 26 Sep 1961 DV announced that executive producer Robert L. Lippert was planning six films for release through Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation, all budgeted between $100,000 and $125,000. Among the projects was Air Patrol, which was currently being scripted by Harry Spaulding. In his 1994 book, Attack of the Monster Movie Makers, author Tom Weaver revealed that Spaulding used the pseudonym "Henry Cross" on screen. According to the 13 Mar 1962 DV, principal photography was scheduled to begin five days later at Producers Studio in Hollywood, CA. A news item in the 26 Mar 1962 DV stated that location filming was underway at the Hollywood Bowl amphitheater. The 18 Apr 1962 Var announced that the picture would be released in Jul 1962.
       Air Patrol opened 3 Jul 1962 in Los Angeles, CA, on a double bill with Mr. Hobbs Takes a Vacation (1962, see entry). Box office reports in the 4 Jul 1962 Var indicated that the bill had already earned $12,000 in San Francisco, CA. A Seattle, WA, opening followed later that month, according to 18 Jul 1962 Var. Other openings included Cincinnati, OH (15 Aug 1962 Var), and Louisville, KY (17 Oct 1962 Var). The picture continued to play into 1963, evidenced by a box office report from Detroit, MI, in the 26 Jun 1963 Var. ... More Less

The 26 Sep 1961 DV announced that executive producer Robert L. Lippert was planning six films for release through Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation, all budgeted between $100,000 and $125,000. Among the projects was Air Patrol, which was currently being scripted by Harry Spaulding. In his 1994 book, Attack of the Monster Movie Makers, author Tom Weaver revealed that Spaulding used the pseudonym "Henry Cross" on screen. According to the 13 Mar 1962 DV, principal photography was scheduled to begin five days later at Producers Studio in Hollywood, CA. A news item in the 26 Mar 1962 DV stated that location filming was underway at the Hollywood Bowl amphitheater. The 18 Apr 1962 Var announced that the picture would be released in Jul 1962.
       Air Patrol opened 3 Jul 1962 in Los Angeles, CA, on a double bill with Mr. Hobbs Takes a Vacation (1962, see entry). Box office reports in the 4 Jul 1962 Var indicated that the bill had already earned $12,000 in San Francisco, CA. A Seattle, WA, opening followed later that month, according to 18 Jul 1962 Var. Other openings included Cincinnati, OH (15 Aug 1962 Var), and Louisville, KY (17 Oct 1962 Var). The picture continued to play into 1963, evidenced by a box office report from Detroit, MI, in the 26 Jun 1963 Var.
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
26 Sep 1961
p. 3.
Daily Variety
13 Mar 1962
p. 2.
Daily Variety
26 Mar 1962
p. 4.
Daily Variety
28 Mar 1962
p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
2 Jul 1962
Section C, p. 11.
Variety
18 Apr 1962
p. 11.
Variety
4 Jul 1962
p. 8.
Variety
18 Jul 1962
p. 9.
Variety
15 Aug 1962
p. 18.
Variety
17 Oct 1962
p. 9.
Variety
26 Jun 1963
p. 9.
DETAILS
Release Date:
June 1962
Premiere Information:
San Francisco, CA, opening: late June 1962
Los Angeles opening: 3 July 1962
Production Date:
began 18 March 1962
Copyright Claimant:
Associated Producers, Inc.
Copyright Date:
17 June 1962
Copyright Number:
LP22802
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Widescreen/ratio
CinemaScope
Duration(in mins):
70
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

A valuable Fragonard painting is stolen from art dealer Arthur Murcott's office by a thief who carries it to the roof of the building, where a helicopter awaits him. It seems to be a perfect getaway. The Los Angeles Police Department assigns three detectives to investigate the case, and they learn that the night watchman had noticed a helicopter flying over the building on the night of the crime. Sergeant Castle checks on all helicopter operators and becomes suspicious of Oliver Dunning, who has recently acquired a helicopter. Castle's partners question Millard Nolan, an aging actor and art collector who originally commissioned Murcott to buy the painting but was forced to cancel the purchase. Murcott receives a phone call demanding $100,000 ransom for the painting. His secretary, Mona Whitney, prepares to take the money to the Hollywood Bowl, where she is told she will find the Fragonard. Meanwhile, Nolan pushes Dunning from a rooftop and then picks up the ransom money, but he is spotted as he drives onto the freeway. Sergeant Castle takes pursuit by helicopter, and Nolan, cornered on top of a river dam, falls after being shot by the ... +


A valuable Fragonard painting is stolen from art dealer Arthur Murcott's office by a thief who carries it to the roof of the building, where a helicopter awaits him. It seems to be a perfect getaway. The Los Angeles Police Department assigns three detectives to investigate the case, and they learn that the night watchman had noticed a helicopter flying over the building on the night of the crime. Sergeant Castle checks on all helicopter operators and becomes suspicious of Oliver Dunning, who has recently acquired a helicopter. Castle's partners question Millard Nolan, an aging actor and art collector who originally commissioned Murcott to buy the painting but was forced to cancel the purchase. Murcott receives a phone call demanding $100,000 ransom for the painting. His secretary, Mona Whitney, prepares to take the money to the Hollywood Bowl, where she is told she will find the Fragonard. Meanwhile, Nolan pushes Dunning from a rooftop and then picks up the ransom money, but he is spotted as he drives onto the freeway. Sergeant Castle takes pursuit by helicopter, and Nolan, cornered on top of a river dam, falls after being shot by the police. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.