Almost Angels (1962)

93 mins | Drama | 10 October 1962

Director:

Steven Previn

Writer:

Vernon Harris

Cinematographer:

Kurt Grigoleit

Editor:

Alfred Srp

Production Designers:

Werner Schlichting, Isabella Schlichting

Production Company:

Walt Disney Productions
Full page view
HISTORY

In his article for the 25 Mar 1962 LAT, producer Walt Disney announced that the film, originally titled Born to Sing, would be a two-hour television special. Six months later, the 26 Sep 1962 LAT reported that the film, re-titled Almost Angels, would be released the following month on a double bill with the reissued animated feature, Lady and the Tramp (1955, see entry). Both pictures opened 10 Oct 1962 in Los Angeles, CA. According to the 31 Oct 1962 NYT, Almost Angels opened that day in New York City with the accompanying feature, The Trunk (1961, see entry). The review in the 29 Aug 1962 DV described the plot as “unbearably saccharine,” and noted that location photography took place “in and around” Vienna, Austria. The Vienna Symphony Orchestra was credited with performing the score. Public response was generally positive, evident in the 24 Oct 1962 Var, which reported box office receipts in the tens of thousands of dollars in several major cities.
       The picture was awarded four stars by the Southern California Motion Picture Council, as reported in the 25 Sep 1962 DV. On 25 Apr 1963 LAT announced that Austrian Ambassador Wilfried Platzer was presenting a citation to Walt Disney the following day at the World Affairs Council luncheon. Disney was being honored for his “contribution to children,” particularly his two recent productions, Miracle of the White Stallions (1963, see entry) and Almost Angels, both of which celebrated two venerable Austrian ...

More Less

In his article for the 25 Mar 1962 LAT, producer Walt Disney announced that the film, originally titled Born to Sing, would be a two-hour television special. Six months later, the 26 Sep 1962 LAT reported that the film, re-titled Almost Angels, would be released the following month on a double bill with the reissued animated feature, Lady and the Tramp (1955, see entry). Both pictures opened 10 Oct 1962 in Los Angeles, CA. According to the 31 Oct 1962 NYT, Almost Angels opened that day in New York City with the accompanying feature, The Trunk (1961, see entry). The review in the 29 Aug 1962 DV described the plot as “unbearably saccharine,” and noted that location photography took place “in and around” Vienna, Austria. The Vienna Symphony Orchestra was credited with performing the score. Public response was generally positive, evident in the 24 Oct 1962 Var, which reported box office receipts in the tens of thousands of dollars in several major cities.
       The picture was awarded four stars by the Southern California Motion Picture Council, as reported in the 25 Sep 1962 DV. On 25 Apr 1963 LAT announced that Austrian Ambassador Wilfried Platzer was presenting a citation to Walt Disney the following day at the World Affairs Council luncheon. Disney was being honored for his “contribution to children,” particularly his two recent productions, Miracle of the White Stallions (1963, see entry) and Almost Angels, both of which celebrated two venerable Austrian institutions.
       Box office reports in the 1 Aug 1962 Var revealed that the picture was released in England as Born to Sing. The 12 Sep 1962 LAT noted that cast members Fritz Eckhardt, Bruni Löbel, and Hans Holt were renowned Austrian playwrights.

Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
LOCATION
PERSONAL & COMPANY INDEX CREDITS
CREDIT
HISTORY CREDITS
CREDIT TYPE
CREDIT
Personal note credit:
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
29 Aug 1962
p. 3, 8
Daily Variety
25 Sep 1962
p. 4
Los Angeles Times
25 Mar 1962
Section D, p. 4
Los Angeles Times
12 Sep 1962
Section C, p. 12
Los Angeles Times
26 Sep 1962
Section D, p. 15
Los Angeles Times
3 Oct 1962
Section C, p. 9
Los Angeles Times
10 Oct 1962
Section C, p. 11
Los Angeles Times
25 Apr 1963
Section C, p. 8
New York Times
31 Oct 1962
p. 34
New York Times
1 Nov 1962
p. 34
Variety
1 Aug 1962
p. 13
Variety
10 Oct 1962
p. 16
Variety
24 Oct 1962
p. 10
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Walt Disney Production
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
WRITERS
Based on an orig idea & story by
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
2nd unit photog
ART DIRECTORS
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Cost
MUSIC
Mus dir--background mus
Mus selections arr & cond
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Hairstyles
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod supv
Prod mgr
Prod mgr
Dial coach
Studio rep
SOURCES
MUSIC
"The Rose in the Meadow" and "The Lindon Tree," by Franz Schubert; "The Blue Danube," by Johann Strauss II, selected works of Johannes Brahms.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Born To Sing
Release Date:
10 October 1962
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 10 Oct 1962; New York opening: 31 Oct 1962
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Walt Disney Productions
1 August 1962
LP22955
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
93
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Thirteen-year-old Toni Fiala wins a place in the Vienna Boys' Choir at an audition held by choir director Eisinger. With his mother's encouragement, he overcomes the opposition of his father, a railway engineer, and is permitted to join the choir. Since his scholarly abilities are limited, he faces the problem of maintaining the good grades required by both his father and the choir school. During his first few days at the school, Toni is placed in the care of Peter Schaefer, the oldest member of the choir. Their initial friendship turns to distrust when Peter learns that choirmaster Max Heller is teaching Toni a song that has always been one of Peter's solos. At first, he tries to sabotage Toni's chances of success in the choir, but later he accepts and even helps his young friend. Just before they are scheduled to leave on a tour, the boys discover that Peter's voice has cracked. They attempt to cover for him, but the deception is revealed. Due to his unusual ability to compose and conduct, however, Peter is permitted to go on tour as an assistant ...

More Less

Thirteen-year-old Toni Fiala wins a place in the Vienna Boys' Choir at an audition held by choir director Eisinger. With his mother's encouragement, he overcomes the opposition of his father, a railway engineer, and is permitted to join the choir. Since his scholarly abilities are limited, he faces the problem of maintaining the good grades required by both his father and the choir school. During his first few days at the school, Toni is placed in the care of Peter Schaefer, the oldest member of the choir. Their initial friendship turns to distrust when Peter learns that choirmaster Max Heller is teaching Toni a song that has always been one of Peter's solos. At first, he tries to sabotage Toni's chances of success in the choir, but later he accepts and even helps his young friend. Just before they are scheduled to leave on a tour, the boys discover that Peter's voice has cracked. They attempt to cover for him, but the deception is revealed. Due to his unusual ability to compose and conduct, however, Peter is permitted to go on tour as an assistant conductor.

Less

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

Gone with the Wind

[ Note from the Editors : the following information is based on contemporary news items, feature articles, reviews, interviews, memoranda and corporate records. Information obtained from modern sources ... >>

Shoes

The print viewed for this record was a restoration of filmmaker Lois Weber’s 1916 feature-length picture, Shoes, completed in 2010 by the Eye Filmmuseum, Netherlands, ... >>

The Symbol of the Unconquered

This Black independent film was shot in Fort Lee, NJ, under the working title The Wilderness Trail. A 6 Nov 1920 Moving Picture World item ... >>

I Love Trouble

The working title of this film was The Double Take ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.