Full page view
HISTORY

According to the 14 Oct 1922 Exhibitors Herald, brothers and producing partners Ray and Albert Rockett spent more than two years researching the life of U.S. President Abraham Lincoln with University of Southern California professor Dr. Gilbert Ellis Bailey. The Mar—Aug 1924 Picture-Play Magazine review indicated that the relatively “young and inexperienced” filmmakers were nearly forced to abandon the project due to lack of funding.
       An article in the Aug 1923 AmCin documented that the production spent four months and 200,000 feet of film shooting what it called The Dramatic Life of Abraham Lincoln. The cost of research and writing the script was greater than the filming budget. Because of financial constraints, director Phil Rosen and his cameramen created scenes "within the bounds of simplicity." Makeup was kept to a minimum. To cut down on retakes during the three days of filming Civil War battle scenes employing more than a thousand actors and extras, cinematographers Robert Kirrle and Lyman Browning used extra cameramen, including Robert Newhard, Max Du Pont, Allen Davey, and Reginald Lyons. More than 45,000 rounds of ammunition were expended. The list of technical staff was taken from the AmCin article.
       A 13 Oct 1922 brief in Film Daily stated that the picture would have its first showing before U.S. Congress, President Warren Harding, and his Cabinet in Washington, D.C., although the date of the screening could not be determined. On 19 Jan 1924, Exhibitors Herald announced that the release title had been shortened to simply, Abraham Lincoln.
       According to the 7 Jul 1923 Exhibitors Herald, the Rockett ... More Less

According to the 14 Oct 1922 Exhibitors Herald, brothers and producing partners Ray and Albert Rockett spent more than two years researching the life of U.S. President Abraham Lincoln with University of Southern California professor Dr. Gilbert Ellis Bailey. The Mar—Aug 1924 Picture-Play Magazine review indicated that the relatively “young and inexperienced” filmmakers were nearly forced to abandon the project due to lack of funding.
       An article in the Aug 1923 AmCin documented that the production spent four months and 200,000 feet of film shooting what it called The Dramatic Life of Abraham Lincoln. The cost of research and writing the script was greater than the filming budget. Because of financial constraints, director Phil Rosen and his cameramen created scenes "within the bounds of simplicity." Makeup was kept to a minimum. To cut down on retakes during the three days of filming Civil War battle scenes employing more than a thousand actors and extras, cinematographers Robert Kirrle and Lyman Browning used extra cameramen, including Robert Newhard, Max Du Pont, Allen Davey, and Reginald Lyons. More than 45,000 rounds of ammunition were expended. The list of technical staff was taken from the AmCin article.
       A 13 Oct 1922 brief in Film Daily stated that the picture would have its first showing before U.S. Congress, President Warren Harding, and his Cabinet in Washington, D.C., although the date of the screening could not be determined. On 19 Jan 1924, Exhibitors Herald announced that the release title had been shortened to simply, Abraham Lincoln.
       According to the 7 Jul 1923 Exhibitors Herald, the Rockett brothers planned to have the film inured and stored in Washington, D.C., or Springfield, IL, until 12 Feb 2109, which marks the three hundredth anniversary of Lincoln’s birth.
       Abraham Lincoln was voted one of the “Top Best Features” of 1924 by the 1929 Film Daily Year Book, as reported in the Feb 7, 1930 FD. The Jun 1924 The Educational Screen also listed it as one of “The Ten Best [Films] for 1924-25.” More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
American Cinematographer
Aug 1923
p. 5, 6, 25.
Exhibitors Herald
14 Oct 1922
p. 28.
Exhibitors Herald
7 Jul 1923.
---
Exhibitors Herald
19 Jan 1924
p. 33.
Film Daily
13 Oct 1922.
---
Film Daily
27 Jan 1924
p. 6.
Film Daily
7 Feb 1930
p. 8.
Moving Picture World
2 Feb 1924
p. 415.
New York Times
22 Jan 1924
p. 17.
Picture-Play Magazine
Mar-Aug 1924
pp. 52-53.
The Educational Screen
Jun 1925
p. 358.
Variety
24 Jan 1924
p. 26.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Cast--Kentucky and Indiana Period:
Cast--The Springfield Period:
Cast--The Washington Period:
Cast--President Lincoln's Cabinet:
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCERS
Prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
Asst cam
Asst cam
Asst cam
Asst cam
PRODUCTION MISC
Tech staff
Tech staff
Tech staff
Tech staff
Tech staff
Tech staff
Tech staff
Tech staff
Tech staff
Tech staff
Tech staff
Tech staff
Tech staff
Tech staff
Tech staff
Tech staff
Tech staff
Tech staff
Tech staff
Tech staff
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Dramatic Life of Abraham Lincoln
Release Date:
2 February 1924
Premiere Information:
New York premiere: 21 January 1924
Copyright Claimant:
Rockett-Lincoln Film Co.
Copyright Date:
2 May 1924
Copyright Number:
LP20136
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
11,380
Length(in reels):
12
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Episodes record the life of Abraham Lincoln from his Hodgenville, Kentucky, birth to his death in Washington, D.C.: the saving of his life as an infant, his boyhood years down through his romance with Ann Rutledge, his career as a lawyer and legislator, his nomination and election, the war years, and his 1965 ... +


Episodes record the life of Abraham Lincoln from his Hodgenville, Kentucky, birth to his death in Washington, D.C.: the saving of his life as an infant, his boyhood years down through his romance with Ann Rutledge, his career as a lawyer and legislator, his nomination and election, the war years, and his 1965 assassination. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.