King: A Filmed Record ... Montgomery to Memphis (1970)

177 mins | Documentary | 24 March 1970

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HISTORY

Copyright length: 185 min. Originally shown on one night in over 500 theaters, with proceeds benefiting charity, film was released on a regular basis by Maron Films, Ltd. in Sep ... More Less

Copyright length: 185 min. Originally shown on one night in over 500 theaters, with proceeds benefiting charity, film was released on a regular basis by Maron Films, Ltd. in Sep 1970. More Less

CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Connecting seq dir
Connecting seq dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
Assoc prod
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Film ed
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Montgomery to Memphis
Release Date:
24 March 1970
Copyright Claimant:
Commonwealth United Corp.
Copyright Date:
25 February 1970
Copyright Number:
MP20745
Duration(in mins):
177
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

The film covers the public life and contribution to the civil rights movement of Martin Luther King, Jr., beginning with King's successful bus boycott in Montgomery, Alabama, in 1955-56. He is shown with the freedom riders in the early 1960's; delivering the famous "I Have a Dream" speech at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D. C., in 1963; and as a protagonist during the brutal confrontations in Birmingham, Alabama, and in St. Augustine, Florida. Other aspects of King's involvement included organizing the housing protests in Chicago and bringing national attention to the racial injustice in Selma, Alabama, during the voter registration marches. The highest point of acclaim for his work was in 1964 when he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for his courage and nonviolent principles in the fight for racial equality. In April of 1968, King's career was ended in Memphis, Tennessee, by an assassin's ... +


The film covers the public life and contribution to the civil rights movement of Martin Luther King, Jr., beginning with King's successful bus boycott in Montgomery, Alabama, in 1955-56. He is shown with the freedom riders in the early 1960's; delivering the famous "I Have a Dream" speech at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D. C., in 1963; and as a protagonist during the brutal confrontations in Birmingham, Alabama, and in St. Augustine, Florida. Other aspects of King's involvement included organizing the housing protests in Chicago and bringing national attention to the racial injustice in Selma, Alabama, during the voter registration marches. The highest point of acclaim for his work was in 1964 when he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for his courage and nonviolent principles in the fight for racial equality. In April of 1968, King's career was ended in Memphis, Tennessee, by an assassin's bullet. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.