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HISTORY

Jesse L. Lasky Feature Play Co. was founded in Hollywood, CA, in late 1913 by Lasky, Samuel Goldfish (later Goldwyn), and Cecil B. DeMille. An item in the 27 December 1913 Moving Picture World reported that former Pathe Freres cameraman Alfredo Gondolfi had joined the Jesse L. Lasky Feature Film Company and left for Wyoming “this week” to work on The Squaw Man.Oscar Apfel...joined Mr. Cecil B De Mille at Butte, Mont., this week, from which point they will endeavor to locate Maverick, the town in which Mr. Royal based the original locate of his play, ‘The Squaw Man.’ Tony A. Wamby, the original of Nat U. Rich in [the play] ‘The Squaw Man,’ has been discovered by Mr. Royal and will be used in the picture.”
       One-act versions of the play were produced as early as 1904. Modern sources credit the editing to Mamie Wagner. Modern sources also credit Wilfred Buckland as art director, but this is incorrect. Buckland did not sign with the Lasky Feature Play Company until 19 May 1914, four months after The Squaw Man was completed.
       This was the first release of the Jesse L. Lasky Feature Play Co. Although this was not the first motion picture to be filmed in Hollywood, The Squaw Man was the first Hollywood-made feature-length production.
       Dustin Farnum portrayed "Jim Marston" in the stage version of The Squaw Man as early as 1908, when the production was playing to capacity crowds in Chicago, according to the 12 September Billboard. Farnum's troupe successfully toured the country that year.
       Farnum and DeMille "made Mona ...

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Jesse L. Lasky Feature Play Co. was founded in Hollywood, CA, in late 1913 by Lasky, Samuel Goldfish (later Goldwyn), and Cecil B. DeMille. An item in the 27 December 1913 Moving Picture World reported that former Pathe Freres cameraman Alfredo Gondolfi had joined the Jesse L. Lasky Feature Film Company and left for Wyoming “this week” to work on The Squaw Man.Oscar Apfel...joined Mr. Cecil B De Mille at Butte, Mont., this week, from which point they will endeavor to locate Maverick, the town in which Mr. Royal based the original locate of his play, ‘The Squaw Man.’ Tony A. Wamby, the original of Nat U. Rich in [the play] ‘The Squaw Man,’ has been discovered by Mr. Royal and will be used in the picture.”
       One-act versions of the play were produced as early as 1904. Modern sources credit the editing to Mamie Wagner. Modern sources also credit Wilfred Buckland as art director, but this is incorrect. Buckland did not sign with the Lasky Feature Play Company until 19 May 1914, four months after The Squaw Man was completed.
       This was the first release of the Jesse L. Lasky Feature Play Co. Although this was not the first motion picture to be filmed in Hollywood, The Squaw Man was the first Hollywood-made feature-length production.
       Dustin Farnum portrayed "Jim Marston" in the stage version of The Squaw Man as early as 1908, when the production was playing to capacity crowds in Chicago, according to the 12 September Billboard. Farnum's troupe successfully toured the country that year.
       Farnum and DeMille "made Mona Darkfather a splendid offer to play the Indian girl, Naturich, in The Squaw Man, but her contract with the Kalem company did not allow of her acceptance," according to the San Francisco Dramatic Review.
       The role of the boy, Hal, was portrayed by Carmen De Rue, who was billed variously as "Baby DeRue" and "Freddy DeRue," to mask the fact that she was a girl.
       Cecil B. DeMille also directed two remakes of The Squaw Man, a silent in 1918, and a sound version for M-G-M in 1931, starring Warner Baxter (see entries). An earlier version was filmed in 1908 (see entry).

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Billboard
12 Sep 1908
p. 8
Moving Picture World
27 Dec 1913
p. 1551
Moving Picture World
28 Feb 1914
pp. 1068-69
Moving Picture World
7 Feb 1914
p. 730
New York Dramatic Mirror
25 Feb 1914
p. 36
San Francisco Dramatic Review
10 Jan 1914
p. 11
Variety
20 Feb 1914
p. 23
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Oscar C. Apfel
Dir
WRITERS
Scenario
Oscar C. Apfel
Scenario
PHOTOGRAPHY
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play The Squaw Man by Edwin Milton Royle (New York, 23 Oct 1905).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
15 February 1914
Production Date:
began 29 December 1913
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Jesse L. Lasky Feature Play Co., Inc.
18 February 1914
LU2169
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

James Wynnegate is made executor of funds raised by members of his regiment for the families of men killed in battle. His cousin, the Earl of Kerhill, embezzles the funds, but Kerhill’s wife, Diana, convinces Wynnegate, who loves her, to take the blame and leave England in order to save the family’s honor. Wynnegate eventually arrives in Wyoming and buys a ranch using the name Jim Carston. An Indian maiden, Nat-U-Ritch, saves him from an attack by Cash Hawkins, and he marries her when he learns that she is pregnant. Some time later, Diana Kerhill comes West with news that her husband is dead, but that he had admitted his theft shortly before dying. Nat-U-Ritch, knowing that her husband will send their young son Hal away, and hearing that she will be arrested for killing Hawkins, commits suicide. At the end, Diana embraces ...

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James Wynnegate is made executor of funds raised by members of his regiment for the families of men killed in battle. His cousin, the Earl of Kerhill, embezzles the funds, but Kerhill’s wife, Diana, convinces Wynnegate, who loves her, to take the blame and leave England in order to save the family’s honor. Wynnegate eventually arrives in Wyoming and buys a ranch using the name Jim Carston. An Indian maiden, Nat-U-Ritch, saves him from an attack by Cash Hawkins, and he marries her when he learns that she is pregnant. Some time later, Diana Kerhill comes West with news that her husband is dead, but that he had admitted his theft shortly before dying. Nat-U-Ritch, knowing that her husband will send their young son Hal away, and hearing that she will be arrested for killing Hawkins, commits suicide. At the end, Diana embraces Hal.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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