Gambit (1966)

108 mins | Comedy | 1966

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CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Joseph Kenny
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
John McCarthy
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Gowns des
MUSIC
Mus comp & cond
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairstyles for Miss MacLaine created by
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit prod mgr
Dial coach
Titles
Titles
SOURCES
SONGS
"I'm Gonna Spread My Wings," words and music by Maurice Jarre.
SONGWRITER/COMPOSER
DETAILS
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 21 Dec 1966
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Universal Pictures
7 January 1967
LP34491
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex
Color
Technicolor
Widescreen/ratio
Techniscope
Duration(in mins):
108
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

While working in a Hong Kong nightclub, a Eurasian woman named Nicole Chang is approached by a cockney thief, Harry Dean, and a French sculptor, Emile Fournier. The two men plan to use her in their scheme to steal a priceless Chinese statuette, the LiSsu, from Middle Eastern multimillionaire Ahmad Shahbandar since Nicole's appearance is remarkably similar to that of Shahbandar's late wife, whose features resembled those of the statuette. Posing as Sir Harold and Lady Dean, Harry and Nicole travel to Shahbandar's city of Dammuz, where he lives in a hotel penthouse. Although Shahbandar is immediately taken with Nicole, he quickly suspects their true purpose and substitutes a copy for the real statuette. By chance, Harry discovers the hiding place of the real statuette and removes the work, but Nicole is apprehended and told to inform him that unless the LiSsu is returned he will be killed. Harry explains to Nicole that Emile is so accomplished at duplicating art treasures that even art dealers cannot distinguish between his work and an original. After assuring Shahbandar by telegram that the real statuette remains within the penthouse, Harry makes plans to sell a copy made by Emile 2 years earlier, revealing that the "theft" was a hoax designed to facilitate the sale of the fraud. Nicole refuses to stay with Harry, however, unless he gives up his life of crime; and Harry, in a grand display of love, smashes Emile's copy of the statue. As Harry leaves with the delighted Nicole, he glances knowingly at Emile. Once alone, Emile goes to a wall closet and removes three more imitation ...

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While working in a Hong Kong nightclub, a Eurasian woman named Nicole Chang is approached by a cockney thief, Harry Dean, and a French sculptor, Emile Fournier. The two men plan to use her in their scheme to steal a priceless Chinese statuette, the LiSsu, from Middle Eastern multimillionaire Ahmad Shahbandar since Nicole's appearance is remarkably similar to that of Shahbandar's late wife, whose features resembled those of the statuette. Posing as Sir Harold and Lady Dean, Harry and Nicole travel to Shahbandar's city of Dammuz, where he lives in a hotel penthouse. Although Shahbandar is immediately taken with Nicole, he quickly suspects their true purpose and substitutes a copy for the real statuette. By chance, Harry discovers the hiding place of the real statuette and removes the work, but Nicole is apprehended and told to inform him that unless the LiSsu is returned he will be killed. Harry explains to Nicole that Emile is so accomplished at duplicating art treasures that even art dealers cannot distinguish between his work and an original. After assuring Shahbandar by telegram that the real statuette remains within the penthouse, Harry makes plans to sell a copy made by Emile 2 years earlier, revealing that the "theft" was a hoax designed to facilitate the sale of the fraud. Nicole refuses to stay with Harry, however, unless he gives up his life of crime; and Harry, in a grand display of love, smashes Emile's copy of the statue. As Harry leaves with the delighted Nicole, he glances knowingly at Emile. Once alone, Emile goes to a wall closet and removes three more imitation statues.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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