Two for the Road (1967)

112 mins | Comedy-drama | 27 April 1967

Director:

Stanley Donen

Producer:

Stanley Donen

Cinematographer:

Christopher Challis

Production Designer:

Willy Holt

Production Company:

Stanley Donen Films, Inc.
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HISTORY

On 12 Apr 1965, LAT announced that Audrey Hepburn and Rock Hudson had been signed to co-star in Two for the Road, a romantic comedy-drama for director Stanley Donen, marking Hepburn’s third collaboration with Donen following Funny Face (1957, see entry) and Charade (1963, see entry). By the end of summer, however, the 25 Aug 1965 DV reported that Hudson had been replaced by Albert Finney. Filming was set to take place in London, England, where Donen was completing photography on his latest picture, Arabesque (1966, see entry). A 30 Jul 1965 DV brief suggested that Two for the Road was originally slated for development at Universal Pictures before being picked up by Twentieth Century-Fox.
       Although production remained on schedule, the 21 Jan 1966 LAT referred to the project’s “on-again off-again” status following a 7 Jan 1966 DV report that Hepburn suffered a miscarriage. A 20 May 1966 DV production chart stated that principal photography began in France on 3 May 1966. Locations included Beauvallon, Saint-Tropez, La Colle sur Loup, and Nice, with additional work completed at studio facilities in Paris. According to a 27 Dec 1967 NYT article, Donen refused to hire Givenchy, Hepburn’s longtime costumer, claiming that the label was “too chic” for her character. Instead, wardrobe duties were split between five designers, including Ken Scott, who created twelve of the twenty-nine outfits in the film. Additional pieces were supplied by London and Paris boutiques.
       The 19 Apr 1967 NYT announced that the world premiere was scheduled for 27 ... More Less

On 12 Apr 1965, LAT announced that Audrey Hepburn and Rock Hudson had been signed to co-star in Two for the Road, a romantic comedy-drama for director Stanley Donen, marking Hepburn’s third collaboration with Donen following Funny Face (1957, see entry) and Charade (1963, see entry). By the end of summer, however, the 25 Aug 1965 DV reported that Hudson had been replaced by Albert Finney. Filming was set to take place in London, England, where Donen was completing photography on his latest picture, Arabesque (1966, see entry). A 30 Jul 1965 DV brief suggested that Two for the Road was originally slated for development at Universal Pictures before being picked up by Twentieth Century-Fox.
       Although production remained on schedule, the 21 Jan 1966 LAT referred to the project’s “on-again off-again” status following a 7 Jan 1966 DV report that Hepburn suffered a miscarriage. A 20 May 1966 DV production chart stated that principal photography began in France on 3 May 1966. Locations included Beauvallon, Saint-Tropez, La Colle sur Loup, and Nice, with additional work completed at studio facilities in Paris. According to a 27 Dec 1967 NYT article, Donen refused to hire Givenchy, Hepburn’s longtime costumer, claiming that the label was “too chic” for her character. Instead, wardrobe duties were split between five designers, including Ken Scott, who created twelve of the twenty-nine outfits in the film. Additional pieces were supplied by London and Paris boutiques.
       The 19 Apr 1967 NYT announced that the world premiere was scheduled for 27 Apr 1967 at New York City’s Radio City Music Hall, replacing the current engagement of How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying (1967, see entry). The 11 May 1967 LAT indicated that the Los Angeles, CA, opening would be held 24 May 1967 at the Bruin Theater in Westwood.
       Two for the Road received an Academy Award nomination for Writing (Story and Screenplay—written directly for the screen), as well as Golden Globe nominations for Best Original Score—Motion Picture and Actress in a Leading Role—Comedy or Musical. AFI ranked the film #57 on its 2002 list of 100 Years…100 Passions. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
30 Jul 1965
p. 2.
Daily Variety
25 Aug 1965
p. 2.
Daily Variety
7 Jan 1966
p. 2.
Daily Variety
20 May 1966
p. 15.
Los Angeles Times
12 Apr 1965
Section D, p. 21.
Los Angeles Times
21 Jan 1966
Section C, p. 8.
Los Angeles Times
11 May 1967
Section D, p. 22.
Los Angeles Times
24 May 1967
Section E, p. 1, 8.
New York Times
27 Dec 1966
p. 39.
New York Times
19 Apr 1967
p. 51.
New York Times
28 Apr 1967
p. 36.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Stanley Donen Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod exec
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
2nd unit cam
Cam op
Aerial cam
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Asst art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
Mr. Finney's clothes
Miss Hepburn's ward supervised by
Miss Hepburn's clothes by
Miss Hepburn's clothes by
Miss Hepburn's clothes by
Miss Hepburn's clothes by
Miss Hepburn's clothes by
Ward coordinator
MUSIC
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Hairdresser
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod supv
Prod mgr
Prod mgr
DETAILS
Release Date:
27 April 1967
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 27 April 1967
Los Angeles opening: 24 May 1967
Production Date:
began 3 May 1966
Copyright Claimant:
Stanley Donen Films, Inc.
Copyright Date:
31 December 1966
Copyright Number:
LP34888
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
De Luxe
Widescreen/ratio
Panavision
Duration(in mins):
112
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In their 12th year of marriage Joanna and Mark Wallace are en route to the French Riviera for a business and social meeting with Mark's benefactor, architect Maurice Dalbret. Joanna and Mark had met years before on such a trip: Mark was then a fledgling architect hitchhiking through Europe, and Joanna was a music student on tour with a group of American schoolgirls. Their first encounter blossomed into romance, and by the time they reached the Côte d'Azur they knew they were in love and ready for marriage. Soon afterward they returned to Europe, but their motor trip was spoiled by their companions, the snobbish Cathy and Howard Manchester and their obnoxious daughter Ruth. Having learned their lesson, Joanna and Mark took their next vacation alone. Then, while Joanna was pregnant, Mark made a business trip by himself and experienced his first marital infidelity. Success came fairly easy for Mark, but his affluence and sense of self-importance alienated Joanna; and eventually she drifted into an indiscreet affair of her own. Driven to the brink of divorce, they are now forced to evaluate themselves and their marriage. Mutually willing to concede that they have changed but have grown maturely dependent upon each other, they are able to save their ... +


In their 12th year of marriage Joanna and Mark Wallace are en route to the French Riviera for a business and social meeting with Mark's benefactor, architect Maurice Dalbret. Joanna and Mark had met years before on such a trip: Mark was then a fledgling architect hitchhiking through Europe, and Joanna was a music student on tour with a group of American schoolgirls. Their first encounter blossomed into romance, and by the time they reached the Côte d'Azur they knew they were in love and ready for marriage. Soon afterward they returned to Europe, but their motor trip was spoiled by their companions, the snobbish Cathy and Howard Manchester and their obnoxious daughter Ruth. Having learned their lesson, Joanna and Mark took their next vacation alone. Then, while Joanna was pregnant, Mark made a business trip by himself and experienced his first marital infidelity. Success came fairly easy for Mark, but his affluence and sense of self-importance alienated Joanna; and eventually she drifted into an indiscreet affair of her own. Driven to the brink of divorce, they are now forced to evaluate themselves and their marriage. Mutually willing to concede that they have changed but have grown maturely dependent upon each other, they are able to save their marriage. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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