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HISTORY

Principal photography was underway as of 15 Mar 1919, at the studios of Vitagraph Co. of America in Hollywood, CA, as reported in that day’s Moving Picture World. Costarring with lead actress Bessie Love was Robert Gordon, who had recently been stationed in France during World War I. The close of production was announced in the 22 Mar 1919 Motion Picture News.
       The 29 Mar 1919 Moving Picture World stated that Love’s role, described as a somewhat belligerent “Irish urchin,” was a departure from her usually demure characterizations. While the Apr 1919 Motion Picture News claimed that advance bookings for the film demonstrated the actress’s increasing popularity, an article in the Apr 1919 Photo-Play Journal suggested that Vitagraph’s lack of access to “the best theatres” was hindering her career.
       A Yankee Princess opened on 21 Apr 1919 to mixed reviews. Although the 13 Apr 1919 Wid’s Daily attributed the scenario to Love and Bernard McConville, the July 1919 Motion Picture clarified her contribution by quoting the onscreen credit, “Revisions by Bessie Love.” Various sources have credited Clyde De Vinna as cinematographer.
       The closing of an unrelated stage production, titled Yankee Princess, was reported in the 26 Mar 1919 New York Clipper.. The copyright holdings credit Bessie Love with the scenario, but Wid's gives joint credit to Love and Bernard McConville.
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Principal photography was underway as of 15 Mar 1919, at the studios of Vitagraph Co. of America in Hollywood, CA, as reported in that day’s Moving Picture World. Costarring with lead actress Bessie Love was Robert Gordon, who had recently been stationed in France during World War I. The close of production was announced in the 22 Mar 1919 Motion Picture News.
       The 29 Mar 1919 Moving Picture World stated that Love’s role, described as a somewhat belligerent “Irish urchin,” was a departure from her usually demure characterizations. While the Apr 1919 Motion Picture News claimed that advance bookings for the film demonstrated the actress’s increasing popularity, an article in the Apr 1919 Photo-Play Journal suggested that Vitagraph’s lack of access to “the best theatres” was hindering her career.
       A Yankee Princess opened on 21 Apr 1919 to mixed reviews. Although the 13 Apr 1919 Wid’s Daily attributed the scenario to Love and Bernard McConville, the July 1919 Motion Picture clarified her contribution by quoting the onscreen credit, “Revisions by Bessie Love.” Various sources have credited Clyde De Vinna as cinematographer.
       The closing of an unrelated stage production, titled Yankee Princess, was reported in the 26 Mar 1919 New York Clipper.. The copyright holdings credit Bessie Love with the scenario, but Wid's gives joint credit to Love and Bernard McConville.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Herald and Motography
26 Apr 1919
p. 40
Exhibitors Trade Review
19 Apr 1919
p. 1527
Motion Picture
Jul 1919
p. 97
Motion Picture News
22 Mar 1919
p. 1836
Motion Picture News
19 Apr 1919
p. 2523
Motion Picture News
26 Apr 1919
p. 2669, 2725
Moving Picture World
15 Mar 1919
p. 1518
Moving Picture World
29 Mar 1919
pp. 1818-1819
Moving Picture World
19 Apr 1919
pp. 431-432
Moving Picture World
26 Apr 1919
pp. 464-465
New York Clipper
26 Mar 1919
p. 21
Photo-Play Journal
Apr 1919
p. 36
Photo-Play Journal
May 1919
p. 38
Photo-Play World
Jun 1919
p. 36
Variety
11 Apr 1919
p. 55
Wid's Daily
13 Apr 1919
p. 7
DETAILS
Release Date:
21 April 1919
Production Date:
ended in Mar 1919
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Vitagraph Co. of America
1 April 1919
LP13562
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Ragged Patsy O'Reilly imagines herself as the descendant of Irish nobility. When her father, an impoverished contractor, invents an ore crusher, the family suddenly becomes wealthy and moves to New York City. Patsy is enrolled in a finishing school, and her parents tour Ireland, where they purchase, at their daughter's request, a coat-of-arms from the bankrupt Lord Windbourne family. After the O'Reillys return to the U.S., they are visited by Lady Windbourne and her son, the Lord, who do not mention that the adopted coat-of-arms is their own. Lord Windbourne becomes engaged to Patsy, but is later revealed as an impostor by the true heir to the Windbourne line, Larry Burke, an English officer. Larry marries Patsy and gives her an authentic ancestral name and ...

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Ragged Patsy O'Reilly imagines herself as the descendant of Irish nobility. When her father, an impoverished contractor, invents an ore crusher, the family suddenly becomes wealthy and moves to New York City. Patsy is enrolled in a finishing school, and her parents tour Ireland, where they purchase, at their daughter's request, a coat-of-arms from the bankrupt Lord Windbourne family. After the O'Reillys return to the U.S., they are visited by Lady Windbourne and her son, the Lord, who do not mention that the adopted coat-of-arms is their own. Lord Windbourne becomes engaged to Patsy, but is later revealed as an impostor by the true heir to the Windbourne line, Larry Burke, an English officer. Larry marries Patsy and gives her an authentic ancestral name and coat-of-arms.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.