The Oscar (1966)

119 mins | Drama | 1966

Director:

Russell Rouse

Producer:

Clarence Greene

Cinematographer:

Joseph Ruttenberg

Production Designers:

Hal Pereira, Arthur Lonergan

Production Company:

Greene--Rouse Productions
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HISTORY

Additional song: "Carmen Carmelo" (traditional). Footage of actual Academy Awards presentations is included in the ... More Less

Additional song: "Carmen Carmelo" (traditional). Footage of actual Academy Awards presentations is included in the film. More Less

CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
Gowns
Mr. Boyd's ward
Women's ward
MUSIC
Mus supv
Orch
Orch
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Hairstyles
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Unit prod mgr
Dial coach
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Oscar by Richard Sale (New York, 1963).
SONGS
"Thanks for the Memory," words by Leo Robin, music by Ralph Rainger
"All the Way," words by Sammy Cahn, music by James Van Heusen.
DETAILS
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 15 February 1966
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
PathéColor
Duration(in mins):
119
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

On Oscar night, nominee Frank Fane anticipates he will be the winner of the award for best actor. His longtime friend, Hymie Kelly, reflects on Fane's rise to fame. In flashback, Fane's career unrolls from its tawdry beginnings: Small-time cabaret performers Frank Fane, Hymie Kelly, and Laurel Scott run afoul of the law and are falsely arrested. They drift to New York, where the ruthlessly ambitious Frank rejects Laurel for a beautiful dress designer, Kay Bergdahl, unaware that Laurel is pregnant by him. Frank's good looks and fast temper arouse the interest of drama coach Sophie Cantaro, who gets him a small acting part and offers to help launch his career. Persuading her agent, Kappy Kapstetter, to take Frank as a client, she manages to get Frank a Hollywood contract with producer Kenneth H. Regan. Frank plunges into a life of extravagance and publicity seeking. He sends for his old friend Hymie to serve as companion and public relations man and asks him about Laurel. Hymie tells him that he married her and she died. During his drive for fame, Frank pauses long enough to arrange for Kay's promotion to studio designer and then to marry her in Tijuana. Before long, Frank's behavior has made him countless enemies and has caused him to become a boxoffice failure despite the critical acclaim given his most recent picture. Dropped by Regan, Frank is promoted by Kapstetter for a TV pilot but walks out on the project when he learns that he has been nominated for an Oscar. Determined to win the award, Frank hires a private detective, Barney Yale, to leak the story of his past arrest to the press, in ... +


On Oscar night, nominee Frank Fane anticipates he will be the winner of the award for best actor. His longtime friend, Hymie Kelly, reflects on Fane's rise to fame. In flashback, Fane's career unrolls from its tawdry beginnings: Small-time cabaret performers Frank Fane, Hymie Kelly, and Laurel Scott run afoul of the law and are falsely arrested. They drift to New York, where the ruthlessly ambitious Frank rejects Laurel for a beautiful dress designer, Kay Bergdahl, unaware that Laurel is pregnant by him. Frank's good looks and fast temper arouse the interest of drama coach Sophie Cantaro, who gets him a small acting part and offers to help launch his career. Persuading her agent, Kappy Kapstetter, to take Frank as a client, she manages to get Frank a Hollywood contract with producer Kenneth H. Regan. Frank plunges into a life of extravagance and publicity seeking. He sends for his old friend Hymie to serve as companion and public relations man and asks him about Laurel. Hymie tells him that he married her and she died. During his drive for fame, Frank pauses long enough to arrange for Kay's promotion to studio designer and then to marry her in Tijuana. Before long, Frank's behavior has made him countless enemies and has caused him to become a boxoffice failure despite the critical acclaim given his most recent picture. Dropped by Regan, Frank is promoted by Kapstetter for a TV pilot but walks out on the project when he learns that he has been nominated for an Oscar. Determined to win the award, Frank hires a private detective, Barney Yale, to leak the story of his past arrest to the press, in hopes of turning Academy voter sympathy to himself; but his scheme backfires as Yale tries to blackmail him. Abandoned by everyone, Frank attends the ceremonies alone. Emcee Bob Hope calls Merle Oberon to present the best actor award. Shattered, Frank rises from his seat when the actress reads the name of Frank Sinatra as the winner. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.