The Pad (And How To Use It) (1966)

86 mins | Comedy-drama | 1966

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HISTORY

Location scenes were filmed in Los Angeles at the Whiskey-A-Go-Go and the Greek Theatre. Peter Shaffer's one-act play The Private Ear, on which The Pad is based, opened onstage with The Public Eye, another one-act play by Shaffer, which was served as the basis for the 1972 film The Public Eye (see below). ...

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Location scenes were filmed in Los Angeles at the Whiskey-A-Go-Go and the Greek Theatre. Peter Shaffer's one-act play The Private Ear, on which The Pad is based, opened onstage with The Public Eye, another one-act play by Shaffer, which was served as the basis for the 1972 film The Public Eye (see below).

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CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
John McCarthy
Set dec
COSTUMES
MUSIC
VISUAL EFFECTS
Main titles
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairstyles
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit prod mgr
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play The Private Ear by Peter Shaffer (London, 10 May 1962).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
SONGS
"The Pad (And How to Use It)," words and music by Robert Allen.
SONGWRITER/COMPOSER
DETAILS
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 17 Aug 1966
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Ross Hunter Productions
1 October 1966
LP35393
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
86
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

Bob Handman, a shy, introverted lover of classical music, attends a Mozart concert and meets Doreen Marshall by accidentally spilling a soft drink on her. Doreen accepts his invitation to dinner at his Los Angeles apartment for the following evening; but preparing to entertain her, he panics and seeks the help of his best friend, Ted, a successful ladies' man. Ted coaches Bob, then prepares and serves the dinner; and Doreen is fascinated by Bob's suave friend. Bob gets drunk and fights with Ted, who leaves without bidding Doreen goodby. After playing recorded music from Madama Butterfly , which intrigues Doreen, Bob spoils his chances by making an awkward pass at her. As she leaves, Bob gives her Ted's telephone number and resigns himself to his lonely ...

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Bob Handman, a shy, introverted lover of classical music, attends a Mozart concert and meets Doreen Marshall by accidentally spilling a soft drink on her. Doreen accepts his invitation to dinner at his Los Angeles apartment for the following evening; but preparing to entertain her, he panics and seeks the help of his best friend, Ted, a successful ladies' man. Ted coaches Bob, then prepares and serves the dinner; and Doreen is fascinated by Bob's suave friend. Bob gets drunk and fights with Ted, who leaves without bidding Doreen goodby. After playing recorded music from Madama Butterfly , which intrigues Doreen, Bob spoils his chances by making an awkward pass at her. As she leaves, Bob gives her Ted's telephone number and resigns himself to his lonely existence.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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