Lost Command (1966)

129 mins | Drama | 1966

Director:

Mark Robson

Writer:

Nelson Gidding

Producer:

Mark Robson

Cinematographer:

Robert Surtees

Editor:

Dorothy Spencer

Production Designer:

John Stoll

Production Company:

Red Lion Productions
Full page view
HISTORY

Copyright length: 126 min. Filmed in Spain as The Centurions. Prerelease title: Not for Honor and Glory. ...

More Less

Copyright length: 126 min. Filmed in Spain as The Centurions. Prerelease title: Not for Honor and Glory.

Less

PERSONAL & COMPANY INDEX CREDITS
CREDIT
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Mark Robson Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
José Ochoa
Asst dir
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Addl photog
Vis
Cam op
Cam asst
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Asst art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost des
Ward
MUSIC
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Spec eff
MAKEUP
PRODUCTION MISC
Mack Davidson
Prod mgr
Unit mgr
Prod supv
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
French military adv
Spanish military adv
Constr mgr
Casting
Prop master
Dialog coach
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Les centurions by Jean Lartéguy (Paris, 1960).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Not for Honor and Glory
The Centurions
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 25 May 1966
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Red Lion Productions
1 July 1966
LP32836
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Pathé
Widescreen/ratio
Panavision
Duration(in mins):
129
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

After the French defeat in Indochina, a paratroop unit commanded by Lieut. Col. Pierre Raspeguy returns by sea to France. One of the officers, Ben Mahidi, an Arab, leaves the transport at Algiers to visit his family. Uncertain of his own future, Raspeguy visits the Countess de Clairefons, the influential widow of one of the officers killed in action. Despite his provincialism, the countess falls in love with Raspeguy and arranges for his transfer to a crucial trouble spot in Algeria; she promises to marry him if he returns as a general. Raspeguy persuades two of him former officers, Esclavier and Boisfeuras, to help him whip his untrained regiment into a fighting unit. They learn that Ben Mahidi has joined the Algerian terrorists who are carrying on a campaign of violence against the resident French, and Raspeguy and his now well-trained regiment retaliate. Meanwhile, Esclavier has been having an affair with the beautiful Aicha, who has concealed the fact that she is Ben Mahidi's sister. Aicha takes advantage of her opportunity to divert French detonators to her brother's headquarters; but when Esclavier discovers the theft he beats her into revealing Ben Mahidi's hiding place. After promising her that her brother's life will be spared, he has Aicha sent to Paris for imprisonment. Boisfeuras storms the terrorists' stronghold and kills all of the defenders, including Ben Mahidi. Raspeguy condones the action, though Esclavier accuses him of having become a beast. Some days later, as the Countess de Clairefons proudly watches Raspeguy receiving his insignia for the rank of general, Esclavier, now in mufti, watches young Algerians scrawl Indépendance on barracks ...

More Less

After the French defeat in Indochina, a paratroop unit commanded by Lieut. Col. Pierre Raspeguy returns by sea to France. One of the officers, Ben Mahidi, an Arab, leaves the transport at Algiers to visit his family. Uncertain of his own future, Raspeguy visits the Countess de Clairefons, the influential widow of one of the officers killed in action. Despite his provincialism, the countess falls in love with Raspeguy and arranges for his transfer to a crucial trouble spot in Algeria; she promises to marry him if he returns as a general. Raspeguy persuades two of him former officers, Esclavier and Boisfeuras, to help him whip his untrained regiment into a fighting unit. They learn that Ben Mahidi has joined the Algerian terrorists who are carrying on a campaign of violence against the resident French, and Raspeguy and his now well-trained regiment retaliate. Meanwhile, Esclavier has been having an affair with the beautiful Aicha, who has concealed the fact that she is Ben Mahidi's sister. Aicha takes advantage of her opportunity to divert French detonators to her brother's headquarters; but when Esclavier discovers the theft he beats her into revealing Ben Mahidi's hiding place. After promising her that her brother's life will be spared, he has Aicha sent to Paris for imprisonment. Boisfeuras storms the terrorists' stronghold and kills all of the defenders, including Ben Mahidi. Raspeguy condones the action, though Esclavier accuses him of having become a beast. Some days later, as the Countess de Clairefons proudly watches Raspeguy receiving his insignia for the rank of general, Esclavier, now in mufti, watches young Algerians scrawl Indépendance on barracks walls.

Less

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

The Symbol of the Unconquered

This Black independent film was shot in Fort Lee, NJ, under the working title The Wilderness Trail. A 6 Nov 1920 Moving Picture World item noted that editing was ... >>

The Great Dictator

The working title of this picture was The Dictator . In the cast credits at the end of the film, Charles Chaplin is listed in both the "People ... >>

Psycho

Actor Vaughn Taylor's surname is misspelled "Tayler" in the onscreen credits. Several Jun and Jul 1959 HR news items erroneously refer to the film as Psyche. ... >>

Duel in the Sun

Niven Busch's novel was purchased by RKO in 1944. According to a 16 Nov 1944 HR news item, the studio intended to star John Wayne and ... >>

Mystery in Mexico

HR news items add the following information about the production: In Jan 1947, RKO announced that the film was to be a "bi-lingual" release, produced by J. ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.