Send Me No Flowers (1964)

99-100 mins | Comedy | 14 October 1964

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HISTORY

Norman Barasch and Carroll Moore’s stage play Send Me No Flowers debuted 5 Dec 1960 at the Brooks Atkinson Theatre on Broadway, where it ran until 7 Jan 1965. Despite its short time on Broadway, the show enjoyed success at local playhouses around the country, and on 6 May 1963, LAT announced that producer Harry Keller had acquired rights for a screen adaptation. The project was the third and final collaboration of Rock Hudson, Doris Day, and Tony Randall for Universal Pictures following the popularity of Pillow Talk (1959, see entry) and Lover Come Back (1961, see entry).
       According to the 2 Jul 1963 DV, Keller and screenwriter Julius J. Epstein prepared for the production by viewing a performance of the play at the Drury Lane Theatre in Chicago, IL. That fall, an 18 Oct 1963 DV news story announced that Norman Jewison had stepped down from his position as executive producer of The Judy Garland Show (CBS, 29 Sep 1963—29 Mar 1964) to direct the picture. One month later, DV reported that a week of rehearsals was underway with the three principal cast members, after which the 3 Dec 1963 DV brief stated that Jewison and Keller had taken a small production team to scout potential locations in San Francisco, CA.
       The 20 Nov 1963 DV claimed Jewison was discussing a possible “cameo” appearance by actor James Arness, but the role eventually went to Clint Walker.
       Although a 19 Dec 1963 DV news item indicated that principal photography was scheduled to begin that ... More Less

Norman Barasch and Carroll Moore’s stage play Send Me No Flowers debuted 5 Dec 1960 at the Brooks Atkinson Theatre on Broadway, where it ran until 7 Jan 1965. Despite its short time on Broadway, the show enjoyed success at local playhouses around the country, and on 6 May 1963, LAT announced that producer Harry Keller had acquired rights for a screen adaptation. The project was the third and final collaboration of Rock Hudson, Doris Day, and Tony Randall for Universal Pictures following the popularity of Pillow Talk (1959, see entry) and Lover Come Back (1961, see entry).
       According to the 2 Jul 1963 DV, Keller and screenwriter Julius J. Epstein prepared for the production by viewing a performance of the play at the Drury Lane Theatre in Chicago, IL. That fall, an 18 Oct 1963 DV news story announced that Norman Jewison had stepped down from his position as executive producer of The Judy Garland Show (CBS, 29 Sep 1963—29 Mar 1964) to direct the picture. One month later, DV reported that a week of rehearsals was underway with the three principal cast members, after which the 3 Dec 1963 DV brief stated that Jewison and Keller had taken a small production team to scout potential locations in San Francisco, CA.
       The 20 Nov 1963 DV claimed Jewison was discussing a possible “cameo” appearance by actor James Arness, but the role eventually went to Clint Walker.
       Although a 19 Dec 1963 DV news item indicated that principal photography was scheduled to begin that day, filming was stalled when Doris Day fell ill with the flu. A 27 Dec 1963 DV production chart reported a new start date of 23 Dec 1963, but the 31 Dec 1963 edition revealed that Day had since been admitted to the Glendale Hospital and would be unable to work until after the New Year. On 13 Jan 1964, DV stated that the unit had moved from the Universal back lot in Universal City, CA, to the Riviera Country Club in the Pacific Palisades neighborhood of western Los Angeles for three days of filming. Production was completed in early Mar 1964, as indicated by the 18 Mar 1964 DV.
       The 21 Jan 1964 DV announced that Clifford Stine replaced Daniel Fapp as director of photography when Fapp bowed out due to a “painful sinus infection.”
       Send Me No Flowers marked the final motion picture of sound mixer Joe Lapis, who retired after a forty-four-year career at Universal.
       A 13 Jul 1964 DV brief noted that audiences responded poorly to a dream sequence featuring Day in a black wig, which Jewison conceded would likely be removed from the final cut.
       The 12 Aug 1964 DV announced that a clip from the film would be integrated into an episode of The Beverly Hillbillies (CBS, 26 Sep 1962—23 Mar 1971) to promote the picture before its release.
       Send Me No Flowers opened 14 Oct 1964 in theaters and drive-ins across Los Angeles, and 12 Nov 1964 at Radio City Music Hall in New York City. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
2 Jul 1963
p. 2.
Daily Variety
18 Oct 1963
p. 13.
Daily Variety
18 Nov 1963
p. 2.
Daily Variety
20 Nov 1963
p. 2.
Daily Variety
3 Dec 1963
p. 2.
Daily Variety
19 Dec 1963
p. 3.
Daily Variety
20 Dec 1963
p. 2.
Daily Variety
27 Dec 1963
p. 6.
Daily Variety
31 Dec 1963
p. 2.
Daily Variety
13 Jan 1964
p. 4.
Daily Variety
21 Jan 1964
p. 3.
Daily Variety
18 Mar 1964
p. 6.
Daily Variety
13 Jul 1964
p. 2.
Daily Variety
12 Aug 1964
p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
6 May 1963
Section D, p. 17.
Los Angeles Times
14 Oct 1964
Section D, p. 14.
Los Angeles Times
15 Oct 1964
Section C, p. 13.
New York Times
13 Nov 1964
p. 30.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
In charge of prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
Mus
VISUAL EFFECTS
Main titles
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairstyles
Hairstyles
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit prod mgr
Dial coach
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Send Me No Flowers by Norman Barasch, Carroll Moore (New York, 5 Dec 1960).
SONGS
"Send Me No Flowers," words and music by Hal David and Burt Bacharach.
DETAILS
Release Date:
14 October 1964
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 14 October 1964
New York City opening: 12 November 1964
Production Date:
23 December 1963--early March 1964
Copyright Claimant:
Martin Melcher Productions
Copyright Date:
14 September 1964
Copyright Number:
LP33022
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
99-100
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Judy and George Kimball have been happily married for 8 years despite George's hopeless hypochondria. One day George visits his doctor about an imaginary chest pain and overhears him discussing another patient. Assuming that the conversation is about him, George concludes that he has but a few weeks to live. After revealing the tragic news to Arnold Nash, his neighbor and best friend, George puts $1,000 down on three cemetery plots for himself, his wife, and her next husband and then sets out to find someone to take his place. He decides upon Bert Power, a college friend of Judy's who is now an oil magnate. But George's attempts to throw his wife and Bert together only serve to convince Judy that George is trying to cover up an affair of his own. Her suspicions double when she finds George in a compromising position with Linda Bullard, a recently-separated friend whom George is trying to protect from Winston Burr, a suburban wolf. To clear himself, George is forced to tell Judy his terrible news. Her initial horror quickly turns to rage when she learns from George's doctor that he is in perfect physical health. Arnold's advice, given while he is drunk, only worsens the situation, and Judy, now certain there is another woman, begins packing. But when she learns of George's purchase of the cemetery plots, she can no longer doubt his sincerity. George promises to forget his hypochondria forever, and as Judy throws away all his medicine bottles, he celebrates their reconciliation by opening a bottle of champagne and planting a punch on the jaw of the meddlesome Winston ... +


Judy and George Kimball have been happily married for 8 years despite George's hopeless hypochondria. One day George visits his doctor about an imaginary chest pain and overhears him discussing another patient. Assuming that the conversation is about him, George concludes that he has but a few weeks to live. After revealing the tragic news to Arnold Nash, his neighbor and best friend, George puts $1,000 down on three cemetery plots for himself, his wife, and her next husband and then sets out to find someone to take his place. He decides upon Bert Power, a college friend of Judy's who is now an oil magnate. But George's attempts to throw his wife and Bert together only serve to convince Judy that George is trying to cover up an affair of his own. Her suspicions double when she finds George in a compromising position with Linda Bullard, a recently-separated friend whom George is trying to protect from Winston Burr, a suburban wolf. To clear himself, George is forced to tell Judy his terrible news. Her initial horror quickly turns to rage when she learns from George's doctor that he is in perfect physical health. Arnold's advice, given while he is drunk, only worsens the situation, and Judy, now certain there is another woman, begins packing. But when she learns of George's purchase of the cemetery plots, she can no longer doubt his sincerity. George promises to forget his hypochondria forever, and as Judy throws away all his medicine bottles, he celebrates their reconciliation by opening a bottle of champagne and planting a punch on the jaw of the meddlesome Winston Burr. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.