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HISTORY

Working titles included The Anzio Landing, The Landing at Anzio, The Battle for Anzio, and The Battle of Anzio. In Italy, the picture was released under the title Lo sbarco di Anzio.
       A 23 Jul 1965 DV article referred to the picture as The Anzio Landing when listing it as one of producer Dino De Laurentiis’s slate of twenty pictures scheduled for release in 1965 and 1966. Italian director Duilio Coletti was said to be “prepping” the film in Rome, Italy, near the town of Anzio, Italy, where the action is set, as stated in a 23 Mar 1966 Var brief. However, the 11 Apr 1966 DV indicated that De Laurentiis was considering shooting in Spain and had sought logistical cooperation from Spanish authorities.
       By early summer 1966, Columbia Pictures was on board to co-produce with De Laurentiis, as announced in a 5 Jun 1966 NYT item, which stated that Duilio Coletti would write and direct the $3-million production. Columbia provided the financing in its entirety, or at least several million dollars, as indicated in the 11 Oct 1967 Var. The following year, a 2 May 1967 LAT brief named Edward Dmytryk as the director, and noted that Robert Mitchum had been cast in a leading role. The project marked a re-teaming of Dmytryk and Mitchum, who had previously collaborated on Till the End of Time (1946, see entry) and Crossfire (1947, see entry). Despite the hiring of Dmytryk, Duilio Coletti stayed on as second-unit director, according to the 28 Jun ... More Less

Working titles included The Anzio Landing, The Landing at Anzio, The Battle for Anzio, and The Battle of Anzio. In Italy, the picture was released under the title Lo sbarco di Anzio.
       A 23 Jul 1965 DV article referred to the picture as The Anzio Landing when listing it as one of producer Dino De Laurentiis’s slate of twenty pictures scheduled for release in 1965 and 1966. Italian director Duilio Coletti was said to be “prepping” the film in Rome, Italy, near the town of Anzio, Italy, where the action is set, as stated in a 23 Mar 1966 Var brief. However, the 11 Apr 1966 DV indicated that De Laurentiis was considering shooting in Spain and had sought logistical cooperation from Spanish authorities.
       By early summer 1966, Columbia Pictures was on board to co-produce with De Laurentiis, as announced in a 5 Jun 1966 NYT item, which stated that Duilio Coletti would write and direct the $3-million production. Columbia provided the financing in its entirety, or at least several million dollars, as indicated in the 11 Oct 1967 Var. The following year, a 2 May 1967 LAT brief named Edward Dmytryk as the director, and noted that Robert Mitchum had been cast in a leading role. The project marked a re-teaming of Dmytryk and Mitchum, who had previously collaborated on Till the End of Time (1946, see entry) and Crossfire (1947, see entry). Despite the hiring of Dmytryk, Duilio Coletti stayed on as second-unit director, according to the 28 Jun 1967 Var.
       Principal photography commenced on 29 May 1967, as noted in a 2 Jun 1967 DV production chart. Location shooting took place in the Italian cities of Anzio, Taranto, and Rome. Taranto sequences entailed a beach landing scene, according to the 21 Jun 1967 Var, and a crowd scene shot at the Colosseum involved 3,000 background actors and was described in the 1 Oct 1967 LAT as “the biggest scene ever shot in Rome.” Filmmakers received support from the Italian government which, according to a 17 Apr 1968 Var item, was rare at that time. Italian authorities were said to have provided “a quiet naval contribution.”
       Columbia initially planned to release Anzio as a “roadshow” attraction with reserved seating. However, an item in the 20 Mar 1968 Var reported that the studio now intended to distribute the picture as a general wide release. Publicity included an advertisement on a thirty-foot billboard located at Yankee Stadium’s center field. As stated in a 24 Apr 1968 DV brief, the billboard advertisement marked the “first time a film company has used such an ad medium.”
       Due to the picture’s status as an American-Italian co-production, Edward Dmytryk was denied directorial credit for “nationality reasons” on the Italian version. The 30 Aug 1967 Var noted that Dmytryk would receive “a film by” credit on Italian release prints, instead.
       Samuel Marx was identified as a producer in the 24 Aug 1966 issues of LAT and Var, and as a writer-producer in the 4 Jan 1967 Var. The 12 Apr 1968 DV stated that Marty Paich was set to arrange and conduct the title song, “This World Is Yours. DV items published on 28 Sep 1966, 6 Jun 1967, and 14 Aug 1967 listed Henry Silva, the Scots Guards Band, and Elizabeth Thompson as cast members. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
23 Jul 1965
p. 12.
Daily Variety
11 Apr 1966
p. 2.
Daily Variety
5 May 1966
p. 2.
Daily Variety
24 Aug 1966
p. 26.
Daily Variety
28 Sep 1966
p. 10.
Daily Variety
23 Nov 1966
p. 3.
Daily Variety
25 May 1967
p. 6.
Daily Variety
26 May 1967
p. 12.
Daily Variety
2 Jun 1967
p. 8.
Daily Variety
6 Jun 1967
p. 6.
Daily Variety
14 Aug 1967
p. 4.
Daily Variety
12 Apr 1968
p. 3.
Daily Variety
24 Apr 1968
p. 3.
Daily Variety
19 Jun 1968
p. 3, 11.
Daily Variety
28 Jun 1968
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
24 Aug 1966
Section D, p. 14.
Los Angeles Times
27 Feb 1967
Section D, p. 24.
Los Angeles Times
2 May 1967
Section D, p. 12.
Los Angeles Times
9 Aug 1967
Section E, p. 12.
Los Angeles Times
16 Aug 1967
Section E, p. 19.
Los Angeles Times
1 Oct 1967
Section D, p. 15.
Los Angeles Times
10 Jul 1968
Section E, p. 16.
Los Angeles Times
17 Jul 1968
Section G, p. 6.
New York Times
5 Jun 1966
p. 11, 14.
New York Times
25 Jul 1968
p. 26.
Variety
5 May 1965
p. 4.
Variety
23 Mar 1966
p. 23.
Variety
11 May 1966
p. 18.
Variety
24 Aug 1966
p. 70.
Variety
4 Jan 1967
p. 43.
Variety
1 Feb 1967
p. 16.
Variety
26 Apr 1967
p. 21.
Variety
31 May 1967
p. 22.
Variety
21 Jun 1967
p. 22.
Variety
21 Jun 1967
p. 26.
Variety
28 Jun 1967
p. 26.
Variety
30 Aug 1967
p. 30.
Variety
11 Oct 1967
p. 29.
Variety
15 Nov 1967
p. 25.
Variety
7 Feb 1968
p. 15.
Variety
20 Mar 1968
p. 5.
Variety
17 Apr 1968
p. 25.
Variety
26 Jun 1968
p. 8, 11.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dir Italian version
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Asst art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dressing
Set dressing
Set const
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus comp & cond
VISUAL EFFECTS
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
Hairdresser
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Prod inspectors
Prod inspectors
Casting dir
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Anzio by Wynford Vaughan-Thomas (New York, 1961).
SONGS
"This World Is Yours," words and music by Riz Ortolani and Doc Pomus
sung by Jack Jones.
PERFORMER
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
The Battle for Anzio
Lo sbarco di Anzio
The Anzio Landing
The Landing at Anzio
The Battle of Anzio
Release Date:
June 1968
Premiere Information:
Chicago opening: week of 25 June 1968
Los Angeles opening: 17 July 1968
New York opening: 24 July 1968
Production Date:
began 29 May 1967
Copyright Claimant:
Dino De Laurentiis Cinematografica
Copyright Date:
1 July 1968
Copyright Number:
LP36052
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Technicolor
Widescreen/ratio
Panavision
Duration(in mins):
117
Countries:
Italy, United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

On June 22, 1944, Dick Ennis, a cynical American war correspondent, lands at Anzio with the Allied invasion forces. Accompanied by Movie, a ranger, and Corporal Rabinoff, a commando, Ennis drives into Rome without encountering any German troops en route or inside the city. When they report to General Lesly, commander of the Anzio invasion troops, he refuses to advance, suspecting that the Germans are laying a trap. Lesly's decision to reinforce his position permits the Germans to organize their defense; and an eventual Allied raid on a strategic village results in the loss of many Allied lives. Though Ennis, Movie, Rabinoff, and five other men escape, they are trapped behind the Nazi lines. Given temporary refuge by an Italian woman and her teenaged daughters, the men discover a heavily fortified trap being laid by the Germans around the beachhead. Of the eight men, only Ennis, Movie, and Stimler return to Anzio with the information. After a bloody siege of four months, the Allies finally rout the Nazis and march victorious into Rome. Ennis watches General Carson play the conquering hero, then turns away, saddened and disillusioned by the incompetency that led to so many ... +


On June 22, 1944, Dick Ennis, a cynical American war correspondent, lands at Anzio with the Allied invasion forces. Accompanied by Movie, a ranger, and Corporal Rabinoff, a commando, Ennis drives into Rome without encountering any German troops en route or inside the city. When they report to General Lesly, commander of the Anzio invasion troops, he refuses to advance, suspecting that the Germans are laying a trap. Lesly's decision to reinforce his position permits the Germans to organize their defense; and an eventual Allied raid on a strategic village results in the loss of many Allied lives. Though Ennis, Movie, Rabinoff, and five other men escape, they are trapped behind the Nazi lines. Given temporary refuge by an Italian woman and her teenaged daughters, the men discover a heavily fortified trap being laid by the Germans around the beachhead. Of the eight men, only Ennis, Movie, and Stimler return to Anzio with the information. After a bloody siege of four months, the Allies finally rout the Nazis and march victorious into Rome. Ennis watches General Carson play the conquering hero, then turns away, saddened and disillusioned by the incompetency that led to so many deaths. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.