Bandolero! (1968)

106 mins | Western | June 1968

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HISTORY

The film was announced as a “David Weisbart production” in the 20 Jun 1967 DV. James Lee Barrett was said to be working on the screenplay, based on Stanley L. Hough’s short story, “Mace,” after which the project was originally titled. Two days later, a 22 Jun 1967 DV item named Robert L. Jacks as producer. Preparation for filming was done on the Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp. studio lot, as noted in the 19 Jul 1967 DV.
       On 28 Jul 1967, DV announced the new title, Bandolero! Principal photography began in Arizona shortly thereafter, on 2 Oct 1967, according a Var brief published two days later. In addition to Arizona, location shooting took place in Brackettville, TX, as stated in an 8 Nov 1967 Var item. Filming had concluded by mid-Dec 1967, according to the 14 Dec 1967 Los Angeles Sentinel, which noted that Dean Martin hosted a Western-themed wrap party on Soundstage 20 at Twentieth Century—Fox studios.
       The 25 Nov 1967 LAT listed Hal Needham as a cast member. Paul Lockwood reportedly served as a camera operator; Bandolero! marked his last film assignment before his death, according to his obituary in the 20 Feb 1968 DV.
       The world premiere was initially set to take place in Apr 1968 at the HemisFair world exposition in San Antonio, TX, the 17 Jan 1968 Var reported. A later item in the 9 Apr 1968 DV claimed that a 16 Jun 1968 premiere in Fort ...

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The film was announced as a “David Weisbart production” in the 20 Jun 1967 DV. James Lee Barrett was said to be working on the screenplay, based on Stanley L. Hough’s short story, “Mace,” after which the project was originally titled. Two days later, a 22 Jun 1967 DV item named Robert L. Jacks as producer. Preparation for filming was done on the Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp. studio lot, as noted in the 19 Jul 1967 DV.
       On 28 Jul 1967, DV announced the new title, Bandolero! Principal photography began in Arizona shortly thereafter, on 2 Oct 1967, according a Var brief published two days later. In addition to Arizona, location shooting took place in Brackettville, TX, as stated in an 8 Nov 1967 Var item. Filming had concluded by mid-Dec 1967, according to the 14 Dec 1967 Los Angeles Sentinel, which noted that Dean Martin hosted a Western-themed wrap party on Soundstage 20 at Twentieth Century—Fox studios.
       The 25 Nov 1967 LAT listed Hal Needham as a cast member. Paul Lockwood reportedly served as a camera operator; Bandolero! marked his last film assignment before his death, according to his obituary in the 20 Feb 1968 DV.
       The world premiere was initially set to take place in Apr 1968 at the HemisFair world exposition in San Antonio, TX, the 17 Jan 1968 Var reported. A later item in the 9 Apr 1968 DV claimed that a 16 Jun 1968 premiere in Fort Worth, TX, was in the works. The following month, a 10 May 1968 DV article cited a premiere date of 18 Jun 1968 in Dallas, TX. A television special was scheduled to take place the same night, to be aired “on a simulcast” by Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS) and American Broadcasting Company (ABC) affiliates throughout Texas. According to the 17 May 1968 DV, the gala event would take place at the Majestic Theatre in Dallas. In Los Angeles, CA, a citywide opening was scheduled to take place on 3 Jul 1968, as stated in the 13 Jun 1968 LAT.
       Critical reception was tepid. However, the film was listed as the eighteenth-highest earner of 1968 in an 8 Jan 1969 Var box-office chart, which cited cumulative film rentals of $5.5 million, to that time.
       A paperback novelization was published, the 24 Jul 1968 Var reported, and a soundtrack of Jerry Goldsmith’s score, conducted by Lionel Newman, was released by Project 3 Records, according to the 21 Aug 1968 Var.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
20 Jun 1967
p. 1
Daily Variety
22 Jun 1967
p. 1
Daily Variety
19 Jul 1967
p. 2
Daily Variety
28 Jul 1967
p. 16
Daily Variety
1 Aug 1967
p. 1
Daily Variety
11 Dec 1967
p. 2
Daily Variety
20 Feb 1968
p. 20
Daily Variety
9 Apr 1968
p. 2
Daily Variety
10 May 1968
p. 4
Daily Variety
17 May 1968
p. 20
Daily Variety
3 Jun 1968
p. 3
Los Angeles Sentinel
14 Dec 1967
Section A, p. 13
Los Angeles Times
1 Aug 1967
Section D, p. 9
Los Angeles Times
25 Nov 1967
p. 38
Los Angeles Times
13 Jun 1968
---
Los Angeles Times
5 Jul 1968
Section E, p. 1, 6
New York Times
18 Jul 1968
p. 26
Variety
4 Oct 1967
p. 20
Variety
18 Oct 1967
p. 22
Variety
8 Nov 1967
---
Variety
17 Jan 1968
p. 51
Variety
3 Jul 1968
p. 11
Variety
24 Jul 1968
p. 14
Variety
21 Aug 1968
p. 42
Variety
8 Jan 1969
p. 15
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Folmar Blangsted
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
Spec photog eff
MAKEUP
Makeup
Makeup
Hairstyles
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit prod mgr
Stunt coordinator
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the short story "Mace" by Stanley L. Hough (unpublished).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Mace
Release Date:
June 1968
Premiere Information:
Dallas premiere: 18 Jun 1968; Los Angeles opening: 3 Jul 1968; New York opening: 17 Jul 1968
Production Date:
2 Oct--early or mid Dec 1967
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Twentieth Century--Fox Film Corp.
18 June 1968
LP35904
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex
Color
De Luxe
Widescreen/ratio
Panavision
Duration(in mins):
106
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
21717
SYNOPSIS

A band of outlaws led by former Confederate soldier Dee Bishop kill a wealthy rancher during the attempted robbery of a Texas bank. The gang is arrested by Sheriff Johnson, tried, and sentenced to die on the gallows. Dee's older brother, Mace, disguises himself as the hangman and stages a last-minute rescue of the five men. The outlaws flee across the Mexican border, taking the murdered rancher's widow, Maria Stoner, as hostage. While Sheriff Johnson, Deputy Roscoe Bookbinder, and a posse are pursuing the gang, Mace robs the bank and then goes to join his brother's band in a deserted town once ravaged by bandoleros. The fugitives begin arguing among themselves, with Mace, Dee, and Maria on one side, and Pop Chaney and his cowardly son Joe on the other. Eventually, Dee falls in love with Maria and contemplates founding a Montana homestead to atone for his errant past, but his plans are foiled by the arrival of Johnson. Though the sheriff, who is also in love with Maria, captures Dee's men, he is forced to release them when the bandoleros launch an attack. In the slaughter that ensues, Dee and Mace are both killed by the bandolero leader, Angel Muñoz, who is then gunned down by Maria. After burying the two brothers, Johnson and Maria head back to ...

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A band of outlaws led by former Confederate soldier Dee Bishop kill a wealthy rancher during the attempted robbery of a Texas bank. The gang is arrested by Sheriff Johnson, tried, and sentenced to die on the gallows. Dee's older brother, Mace, disguises himself as the hangman and stages a last-minute rescue of the five men. The outlaws flee across the Mexican border, taking the murdered rancher's widow, Maria Stoner, as hostage. While Sheriff Johnson, Deputy Roscoe Bookbinder, and a posse are pursuing the gang, Mace robs the bank and then goes to join his brother's band in a deserted town once ravaged by bandoleros. The fugitives begin arguing among themselves, with Mace, Dee, and Maria on one side, and Pop Chaney and his cowardly son Joe on the other. Eventually, Dee falls in love with Maria and contemplates founding a Montana homestead to atone for his errant past, but his plans are foiled by the arrival of Johnson. Though the sheriff, who is also in love with Maria, captures Dee's men, he is forced to release them when the bandoleros launch an attack. In the slaughter that ensues, Dee and Mace are both killed by the bandolero leader, Angel Muñoz, who is then gunned down by Maria. After burying the two brothers, Johnson and Maria head back to Texas.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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