Apache Uprising (1966)

90 mins | Western | 19 January 1966

Director:

R. G. Springsteen

Producer:

A. C. Lyles

Cinematographer:

Wallace Kelley

Production Designers:

Hal Pereira, Franz Bachelin

Production Company:

A. C. Lyles Productions
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HISTORY

The 7 Jun 1965 DV announced Apache Uprising as the first project for producer A. C. Lyles under his ten-film contract with Paramount Pictures. On 10 Jun 1965, DV stated that actor Edd Byrnes was offered a role, but had a prior commitment to the touring company of the play, Bus Stop. The 2 Jun 1965 Var noted that Lyles preferred to cast his productions with actors of the 1930s and '40s, especially Richard Arlen, who was generally given the role of his choice. A news item in the 23 Jun 1965 DV stated that the film brought actress Jean Parker out of her nine-year retirement from the screen. Lyles told the 12 Aug 1967 NYT that he preferred working with older, more experienced actors, as their professionalism allowed him to shoot a picture in only ten days.
       The 14 Jun 1965 DV reported the start of principal photography that day at Vasquez Rocks in Agua Dulce, CA. Two weeks later, the 28 Jun 1965 issue noted that photography had recently been completed. Theatrical release was planned for Jan 1966, according to the 9 Dec 1965 DV. A review in the 4 Jan 1966 edition described the film as a "dull oater," best suited to second billings.
       The 30 Jun 1965 DV identified Leonard Shannon as publicist.
       Although various sources, including the 8 May 1964 DV, make reference to a 1964 western of the same title, that picture was ultimately released as Apache Rifles (1964, ... More Less

The 7 Jun 1965 DV announced Apache Uprising as the first project for producer A. C. Lyles under his ten-film contract with Paramount Pictures. On 10 Jun 1965, DV stated that actor Edd Byrnes was offered a role, but had a prior commitment to the touring company of the play, Bus Stop. The 2 Jun 1965 Var noted that Lyles preferred to cast his productions with actors of the 1930s and '40s, especially Richard Arlen, who was generally given the role of his choice. A news item in the 23 Jun 1965 DV stated that the film brought actress Jean Parker out of her nine-year retirement from the screen. Lyles told the 12 Aug 1967 NYT that he preferred working with older, more experienced actors, as their professionalism allowed him to shoot a picture in only ten days.
       The 14 Jun 1965 DV reported the start of principal photography that day at Vasquez Rocks in Agua Dulce, CA. Two weeks later, the 28 Jun 1965 issue noted that photography had recently been completed. Theatrical release was planned for Jan 1966, according to the 9 Dec 1965 DV. A review in the 4 Jan 1966 edition described the film as a "dull oater," best suited to second billings.
       The 30 Jun 1965 DV identified Leonard Shannon as publicist.
       Although various sources, including the 8 May 1964 DV, make reference to a 1964 western of the same title, that picture was ultimately released as Apache Rifles (1964, see entry).
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
8 May 1964
p. 8.
Daily Variety
7 Jun 1965
p. 1.
Daily Variety
10 Jun 1965
p. 2.
Daily Variety
14 Jun 1965
p. 3.
Daily Variety
23 Jun 1965
p. 2.
Daily Variety
28 Jun 1965
p. 1.
Daily Variety
30 Jun 1965
p. 3.
Daily Variety
9 Dec 1965
p. 3.
Daily Variety
4 Jan 1966
p. 3.
New York Times
12 Aug 1967
p. 15.
Variety
2 Jun 1965
p. 24.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
MUSIC
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairstyles
Hairstyles
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Way Station by Harry Sanford, Max Steeber (New York, 1961).
DETAILS
Release Date:
19 January 1966
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 19 January 1966
Production Date:
14 June--late June 1965
Copyright Claimant:
A. C. Lyles Productions
Copyright Date:
29 December 1965
Copyright Number:
LP32174
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Technicolor
Widescreen/ratio
Techniscope
Duration(in mins):
90
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Apaches attack Jim Walker as he heads for Lordsburg to pick up a herd of mustangs. Bill Gibson, a scout, saves him, and they both head for Apache Wells, discovering a massacred family along the way. As they bury the bodies, Apaches attack again, but then retreat. The Indians fear a Cavalry patrol, which Jim and Bill join but are unable to convince of an Apache uprising. At Apache Wells, Vance Buckner plans with Jess Cooney and Toby Jack Saunders to rob a stagecoach outside the town. When the stage leaves, Jim, Bill, Jess, and Toby Jack are aboard. At the station, Jim fights with Toby Jack when he insults Janice, one of the passengers. Buckner arrives and, with Jess and Toby Jack, disarms the passengers and demands that the money carried on the stage be turned over to him. After revealing that the robbery was the scheme of Taylor, the district manager of the stage line, Toby Jack kills him. Jim and Bill forestall Buckner's plan to kill them by revealing that an Indian they picked up is Antone, an Apache chief, and that his tribe will surely attack. Toby Jack kills Bill, however, but is himself killed by the Apaches as he leaves the station. Jim and Janice escape but are then captured by the Indians; Jim tells them of Antone's imprisonment inside the station and that the Indians must free Buckner and Jess in order to save the chief. The Indians agree, and the outlaws flee. Jim follows them and finds Jess shot, but when he overtakes Buckner, he is unable to kill him in cold blood. The Apaches, who have followed, demand that Buckner be ... +


Apaches attack Jim Walker as he heads for Lordsburg to pick up a herd of mustangs. Bill Gibson, a scout, saves him, and they both head for Apache Wells, discovering a massacred family along the way. As they bury the bodies, Apaches attack again, but then retreat. The Indians fear a Cavalry patrol, which Jim and Bill join but are unable to convince of an Apache uprising. At Apache Wells, Vance Buckner plans with Jess Cooney and Toby Jack Saunders to rob a stagecoach outside the town. When the stage leaves, Jim, Bill, Jess, and Toby Jack are aboard. At the station, Jim fights with Toby Jack when he insults Janice, one of the passengers. Buckner arrives and, with Jess and Toby Jack, disarms the passengers and demands that the money carried on the stage be turned over to him. After revealing that the robbery was the scheme of Taylor, the district manager of the stage line, Toby Jack kills him. Jim and Bill forestall Buckner's plan to kill them by revealing that an Indian they picked up is Antone, an Apache chief, and that his tribe will surely attack. Toby Jack kills Bill, however, but is himself killed by the Apaches as he leaves the station. Jim and Janice escape but are then captured by the Indians; Jim tells them of Antone's imprisonment inside the station and that the Indians must free Buckner and Jess in order to save the chief. The Indians agree, and the outlaws flee. Jim follows them and finds Jess shot, but when he overtakes Buckner, he is unable to kill him in cold blood. The Apaches, who have followed, demand that Buckner be turned over to them so that he may pay for past crimes against Indians, but they allow Jim and Janice to escape to Lordsburg. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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