Do Not Disturb (1965)

102 mins | Comedy | 24 December 1965

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HISTORY

A 23 May 1963 DV news item reported that actress Doris Day and her manager-husband and producer Martin Melcher planned to collaborate on Some Other Love, based on an original play by William Fairchild. As the story was set in London, England, early news items indicated plans to film location work abroad, and the 7 Jan 1964 DV named Mike Connors as Day’s co-star.
       A few months later, the title had been changed to Do Not Disturb, and Ralph Levy was signed to direct. The new Aug 1964 start date reported in the 27 Jul 1964 DV was repeatedly delayed as location plans moved stateside, and casting continued for nearly a year. According to an article in the 20 Jan 1965 Var, Do Not Disturb was one of several pictures affected by the Screen Actors Guild’s recent enforcement of labor laws heavily limiting the number of foreign actors filling supporting roles that could otherwise be played by Americans. Consequently, producer Aaron Rosenberg revealed that Day’s intended French love interest had to be rewritten for an available actor when their initial choice was rejected by U.S. immigration. Italian Sergio Fantoni eventually filled the role as “Paul Bellari.”
       The 10 Aug 1964 DV indicated that Peter L. Marshall was also considered to star, and additional DV casting items throughout production noted the involvement of Neil Carter, Richard Flato, Donald Lawton, Richard Peel, Clive Wayne, Terence Vliet, eleven-year-old Patrick Mischnaud, and his eight-year-old brother, Gerald Mischnaud.
       On 4 Dec 1964, DV announced that filming had been pushed back until after the ... More Less

A 23 May 1963 DV news item reported that actress Doris Day and her manager-husband and producer Martin Melcher planned to collaborate on Some Other Love, based on an original play by William Fairchild. As the story was set in London, England, early news items indicated plans to film location work abroad, and the 7 Jan 1964 DV named Mike Connors as Day’s co-star.
       A few months later, the title had been changed to Do Not Disturb, and Ralph Levy was signed to direct. The new Aug 1964 start date reported in the 27 Jul 1964 DV was repeatedly delayed as location plans moved stateside, and casting continued for nearly a year. According to an article in the 20 Jan 1965 Var, Do Not Disturb was one of several pictures affected by the Screen Actors Guild’s recent enforcement of labor laws heavily limiting the number of foreign actors filling supporting roles that could otherwise be played by Americans. Consequently, producer Aaron Rosenberg revealed that Day’s intended French love interest had to be rewritten for an available actor when their initial choice was rejected by U.S. immigration. Italian Sergio Fantoni eventually filled the role as “Paul Bellari.”
       The 10 Aug 1964 DV indicated that Peter L. Marshall was also considered to star, and additional DV casting items throughout production noted the involvement of Neil Carter, Richard Flato, Donald Lawton, Richard Peel, Clive Wayne, Terence Vliet, eleven-year-old Patrick Mischnaud, and his eight-year-old brother, Gerald Mischnaud.
       On 4 Dec 1964, DV announced that filming had been pushed back until after the holiday season to allow Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp. to use their full studio space for the production of eleven television pilots. Principal photography officially began 11 Jan 1965, as stated in a DV production brief published four days earlier. The 12 Feb 1965 DV indicated that most work was done on Fox studio facilities in West Los Angeles, CA, with a few days spent at the Western Avenue backlot in Hollywood.
       Just over a month into the production schedule, director Ralph Levy was hospitalized with a virus, and George Marshall was brought on as a temporary replacement. Although a 2 Apr 1965 DV brief stated that Levy briefly returned to the set, Marshall was expected to complete the remainder of filming on his behalf, and he did not ask for credit. DV reported the conclusion of principal photography four days later.
       According to a 22 Dec 1965 Var news item and the 25 Dec 1965 NYT review, the highly publicized cameo of former U.S. Press Secretary Pierre Salinger was not included in the cut screened for the media.
       The film opened 24 Dec 1965 in several New York City and Los Angeles theaters, with general release in Jan 1966. Like Day’s other recent pictures, Do Not Disturb was a commercial success—a 4 Jan 1967 Var chart of the “Big Rental Pictures of 1966” indicated that ticket sales had earned Fox $3.5 million in domestic rentals to date. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
23 May 1963
p. 4.
Daily Variety
13 Sep 1963
p. 2.
Daily Variety
7 Jan 1964
p. 2.
Daily Variety
27 Jul 1964
p. 1.
Daily Variety
10 Aug 1964
p. 6.
Daily Variety
27 Nov 1964
p. 6.
Daily Variety
4 Dec 1964
p. 2.
Daily Variety
15 Jan 1965
p. 10.
Daily Variety
4 Feb 1965
p. 2.
Daily Variety
12 Feb 1965
p. 10.
Daily Variety
23 Feb 1965
p. 1.
Daily Variety
17 Mar 1965
p. 4.
Daily Variety
17 Mar 1965
p. 14.
Daily Variety
2 Apr 1965
p. 2.
Daily Variety
5 Apr 1965
p. 4.
Daily Variety
6 Apr 1965
p. 10.
Los Angeles Times
24 Dec 1965
Section A, p. 13.
Los Angeles Times
27 Dec 1965
Section D, p. 16.
New York Times
25 Dec 1965
p. 17.
Variety
13 May 1964
p. 18.
Variety
20 Jan 1965
p. 3.
Variety
22 Dec 1965
p. 4.
Variety
22 Dec 1965
p. 17.
Variety
4 Jan 1967
p. 8.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
An Aaron Rosenberg-Martin Melcher Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost des
MUSIC
Mus score & cond
Mus associate
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
Spec photog eff
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairstyles supv
Miss Day's hairstyles
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit prod mgr
Main titles
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Some Other Love by William Fairchild (production undetermined).
SONGS
"Au Revoir Is Goodbye With a Smile," words and music by Robert Hilliard and Mort Garson
"Do Not Disturb," words and music by Mark Barkan and Ben Raleigh.
DETAILS
Release Date:
24 December 1965
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 24 December 1965
Production Date:
11 January--6 April 1965
Copyright Claimant:
Martin Melcher Productions
Copyright Date:
13 December 1965
Copyright Number:
LP32096
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex
Color
De Luxe
Widescreen/ratio
CinemaScope
Duration(in mins):
102
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Janet and Mike Harper rent a house in the English countryside from Vanessa Courtwright after Mike, an American wool company executive, moves his office to London to stimulate foreign trade. Mike spends his time in London keeping company with his assistant, Claire Hackett, and attending bachelor parties thrown by his boss, Mr. Langsdorf, while neglected Janet stays home alone. In revenge, she flirts with Paul Bellari, a handsome antique dealer whom she hires to redecorate the house. Janet and Paul fly to Paul's main office in Paris so that Janet may see an antique table. While there, they visit a bistro where Janet passes out from drinking too much wine, and when Paul takes her back to his office, they accidentally get locked in for the night. Mike hears of the trip and takes the next flight to Paris. When he finds them in the office, he fights with Paul and demands a divorce from Janet. Janet agrees, but several days later she overhears Claire Hackett discussing how much Mike loves his wife. At a cocktail party in a hotel, Janet mistakenly winds up in lecherous Mr. Langsdorf's bed, and he chases her through the hotel. Mike becomes jealous, and the two ... +


Janet and Mike Harper rent a house in the English countryside from Vanessa Courtwright after Mike, an American wool company executive, moves his office to London to stimulate foreign trade. Mike spends his time in London keeping company with his assistant, Claire Hackett, and attending bachelor parties thrown by his boss, Mr. Langsdorf, while neglected Janet stays home alone. In revenge, she flirts with Paul Bellari, a handsome antique dealer whom she hires to redecorate the house. Janet and Paul fly to Paul's main office in Paris so that Janet may see an antique table. While there, they visit a bistro where Janet passes out from drinking too much wine, and when Paul takes her back to his office, they accidentally get locked in for the night. Mike hears of the trip and takes the next flight to Paris. When he finds them in the office, he fights with Paul and demands a divorce from Janet. Janet agrees, but several days later she overhears Claire Hackett discussing how much Mike loves his wife. At a cocktail party in a hotel, Janet mistakenly winds up in lecherous Mr. Langsdorf's bed, and he chases her through the hotel. Mike becomes jealous, and the two reunite. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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