Five Weeks in a Balloon (1962)

101 mins | Fantasy, Comedy, Science fiction | 10 August 1962

Director:

Irwin Allen

Producer:

Irwin Allen

Cinematographer:

Winton Hoch

Editor:

George Boemler

Production Designers:

Jack Martin Smith, Alfred Ybarra

Production Company:

Cambridge Productions
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HISTORY

The 20 Jan 1960 DV stated that producer Irwin Allen was adding a film version of Jules Verne’s 1863 novel to his roster of upcoming projects. Allen’s attorneys were in the process of investigating its copyright status. Nearly eighteen months later, Allen told the 7 Jun 1961 NYT that he had recently completed six years of negotiations with the Verne estate to secure motion picture rights, claiming the film version would feature “five international stars.” After rejecting offers from three other studios, Allen accepted a deal with Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation, which would finance two pictures at $2 million each. At the request of studio president Spyros P. Skouras, Allen cancelled a vacation to begin work on the project. Weeks later, however, Skouras postponed production for several months, as reported in the 21 Aug 1961 DV.
       The 3 Nov 1961 LAT noted that Sir Cedric Hardwicke agreed to a “floating part” in the picture, allowing him to work around his television obligations.
       According to the 30 Jan 1962 DV, location filming was initially planned for Hawaii, but was cancelled in favor of Kenya, where sets for The Lion (1962, see entry) were already in place. The 23 Feb 1962 DV reported that principal photography was scheduled to begin 26 Feb 1962. A news item in the 28 Feb 1962 DV stated that singer-actor Fabian would record the film’s title song that day in Los Angeles, CA, before reporting to Twentieth Century-Fox Studios.
       The 25 Aug 1962 LAT described ... More Less

The 20 Jan 1960 DV stated that producer Irwin Allen was adding a film version of Jules Verne’s 1863 novel to his roster of upcoming projects. Allen’s attorneys were in the process of investigating its copyright status. Nearly eighteen months later, Allen told the 7 Jun 1961 NYT that he had recently completed six years of negotiations with the Verne estate to secure motion picture rights, claiming the film version would feature “five international stars.” After rejecting offers from three other studios, Allen accepted a deal with Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation, which would finance two pictures at $2 million each. At the request of studio president Spyros P. Skouras, Allen cancelled a vacation to begin work on the project. Weeks later, however, Skouras postponed production for several months, as reported in the 21 Aug 1961 DV.
       The 3 Nov 1961 LAT noted that Sir Cedric Hardwicke agreed to a “floating part” in the picture, allowing him to work around his television obligations.
       According to the 30 Jan 1962 DV, location filming was initially planned for Hawaii, but was cancelled in favor of Kenya, where sets for The Lion (1962, see entry) were already in place. The 23 Feb 1962 DV reported that principal photography was scheduled to begin 26 Feb 1962. A news item in the 28 Feb 1962 DV stated that singer-actor Fabian would record the film’s title song that day in Los Angeles, CA, before reporting to Twentieth Century-Fox Studios.
       The 25 Aug 1962 LAT described the primary set as “a five-ton gondola.” An item in the 7 Mar 1962 DV revealed that the studio ranch in Malibu, CA, substituted for the Scottish Highlands. The formerly brown hills were turned green by an airdrop of 400 pounds of rye and clover seed and a rainstorm. The 8 Mar 1962 DV noted that 250 background actors were employed for a “slave market sequence.” The following month, Irwin Allen added a third camera crew, in addition to the Los Angeles and Kenya units, as stated in the 5 Apr 1962 DV. Filming was completed 18 Apr 1962, as reported that day in DV. However, the 19 Apr 1962 DV claimed that Fabian would not conclude his role until the following day.
       The 24 May 1962 DV reported that Allen intended to use the “forum” strategy that aided the success of his 1961 release, Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea (see entry). The plan involved conducting one forum per day in each of ten “key cities,” attended by a total of 4,000 exhibitors. The events consisted of a screening, followed by lunch and “an extensive discussion of promotion.” According to the 18 Jul 1962 DV, the process was scheduled to begin 25 Jul 1962 in New York City and end two weeks later in Seattle, WA. Attendance was expected to exceed that of Allen’s previous forum series. The 2 Aug 1962 DV listed Detroit, MI, St. Louis, MO, New Orleans, LA, San Francisco, CA, and Los Angeles among the producer’s other destinations. Also touring on behalf of the picture was animal actor “Chester the Chimp,” as noted in the 3 Aug 1962 DV.
       The 28 Mar 1962 DV noted that assistant director Jack Stubbs temporarily replaced Les Warner, who suffered a torn ankle tendon. The 19 Feb 1962 DV credited choreographer Jimmy Fields with staging the “tribal dance sequence.” According to the 22 Mar 1962 DV, character actor Billy Gilbert completed his role as the “Sultan,” and was assigned a second role as the character’s brother.
       The 6 Aug 1962 DV stated that Allen and Twentieth Century-Fox received a gold plaque from the Missouri-Illinois Theatre Owners Association for their “outstanding contribution of superior family entertainment.” Two days later, DV reported that Allen increased his order of 450 prints to 600. The 10 Aug 1962 DV announced an “all-day” premiere, beginning that morning in Denver, CO. Declared “Five Weeks in a Balloon Day” by Mayor Richard Batterton, events would include a parade from the Denver airport, featuring cast members Barbara Eden, Michael Ansara, and Peter Lorre, along with the Denver University marching band. In addition, 50,000 balloons were dropped over the city, 5,000 of which contained tickets for the premiere. Openings followed in Los Angeles on 21 Aug 1962, and in New York City on 26 Aug 1962. Reviews were generally positive.
       Casting announcements included Mike DeAnda (2 Mar 1962 DV); Al Hoosman (16 Mar 1962 DV); Feridun Colgecen and Paul Kremin (29 Mar 1962 DV); George Sawaya, Alex Plasschaert, Setrack Sassaunian, Norman Nazier, and Ernie Tate (2 Apr 1962 DV); Mahmad Tahir (6 Apr 1962 DV); Joseph Ferrante, Roy Jensen, and Frank Watkins (9 Apr 1962 DV).
The 20 Jan 1960 DV stated that producer Irwin Allen was adding a film version of Jules Verne’s 1863 novel to his roster of upcoming projects. Allen’s attorneys were in the process of investigating its copyright status. Nearly eighteen months later, Allen told the 7 Jun 1961 NYT that he had recently completed six years of negotiations with the Verne estate to secure motion picture rights, claiming the film version would feature “five international stars.” After rejecting offers from three other studios, Allen accepted a deal with Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation, which would finance two pictures at $2 million each. At the request of studio president Spyros P. Skouras, Allen cancelled a vacation to begin work on the project. Weeks later, however, Skouras postponed production for several months, as reported in the 21 Aug 1961 DV.
       The 3 Nov 1961 LAT noted that Sir Cedric Hardwicke agreed to a “floating part” in the picture, allowing him to work around his television obligations.
       According to the 30 Jan 1962 DV, location filming was initially planned for Hawaii, but was cancelled in favor of Kenya, where sets for The Lion (1962, see entry) were already in place. The 23 Feb 1962 DV reported that principal photography was scheduled to begin 26 Feb 1962. A news item in the 28 Feb 1962 DV stated that singer-actor Fabian would record the film’s title song that day in Los Angeles, CA, before reporting to Twentieth Century-Fox Studios.
       The 25 Aug 1962 LAT described the primary set as “a five-ton gondola.” An item in the 7 Mar 1962 DV revealed that the studio ranch in Malibu, CA, substituted for the Scottish Highlands. The formerly brown hills were turned green by an airdrop of 400 pounds of rye and clover seed and a rainstorm. The 8 Mar 1962 DV noted that 250 background actors were employed for a “slave market sequence.” The following month, Irwin Allen added a third camera crew, in addition to the Los Angeles and Kenya units, as stated in the 5 Apr 1962 DV. Filming was completed 18 Apr 1962, as reported that day in DV. However, the 19 Apr 1962 DV claimed that Fabian would not conclude his role until the following day.
       The 24 May 1962 DV reported that Allen intended to use the “forum” strategy that aided the success of his 1961 release, Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea (see entry). The plan involved conducting one forum per day in each of ten “key cities,” attended by a total of 4,000 exhibitors. The events consisted of a screening, followed by lunch and “an extensive discussion of promotion.” According to the 18 Jul 1962 DV, the process was scheduled to begin 25 Jul 1962 in New York City and end two weeks later in Seattle, WA. Attendance was expected to exceed that of Allen’s previous forum series. The 2 Aug 1962 DV listed Detroit, MI, St. Louis, MO, New Orleans, LA, San Francisco, CA, and Los Angeles among the producer’s other destinations. Also touring on behalf of the picture was animal actor “Chester the Chimp,” as noted in the 3 Aug 1962 DV.
       The 28 Mar 1962 DV noted that assistant director Jack Stubbs temporarily replaced Les Warner, who suffered a torn ankle tendon. The 19 Feb 1962 DV credited choreographer Jimmy Fields with staging the “tribal dance sequence.” According to the 22 Mar 1962 DV, character actor Billy Gilbert completed his role as the “Sultan,” and was assigned a second role as the character’s brother.
       The 6 Aug 1962 DV stated that Allen and Twentieth Century-Fox received a gold plaque from the Missouri-Illinois Theatre Owners Association for their “outstanding contribution of superior family entertainment.” Two days later, DV reported that Allen increased his order of 450 prints to 600. The 10 Aug 1962 DV announced an “all-day” premiere, beginning that morning in Denver, CO. Declared “Five Weeks in a Balloon Day” by Mayor Richard Batterton, events would include a parade from the Denver airport, featuring cast members Barbara Eden, Michael Ansara, and Peter Lorre, along with the Denver University marching band. In addition, 50,000 balloons were dropped over the city, 5,000 of which contained tickets for the premiere. Openings followed in Los Angeles on 21 Aug 1962, and in New York City on 26 Aug 1962. Reviews were generally positive.
       Casting announcements included Mike DeAnda (2 Mar 1962 DV); Al Hoosman (16 Mar 1962 DV); Feridun Colgecen and Paul Kremin (29 Mar 1962 DV); George Sawaya, Alex Plasschaert, Setrack Sassaunian, Norman Nazier, and Ernie Tate (2 Apr 1962 DV); Mahmad Tahir (6 Apr 1962 DV); Joseph Ferrante, Roy Jensen, and Frank Watkins (9 Apr 1962 DV).
The 20 Jan 1960 DV stated that producer Irwin Allen was adding a film version of Jules Verne’s 1863 novel to his roster of upcoming projects. Allen’s attorneys were in the process of investigating its copyright status. Nearly eighteen months later, Allen told the 7 Jun 1961 NYT that he had recently completed six years of negotiations with the Verne estate to secure motion picture rights, claiming the film version would feature “five international stars.” After rejecting offers from three other studios, Allen accepted a deal with Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation, which would finance two pictures at $2 million each. At the request of studio president Spyros P. Skouras, Allen cancelled a vacation to begin work on the project. Weeks later, however, Skouras postponed production for several months, as reported in the 21 Aug 1961 DV.
       The 3 Nov 1961 LAT noted that Sir Cedric Hardwicke agreed to a “floating part” in the picture, allowing him to work around his television obligations.
       According to the 30 Jan 1962 DV, location filming was initially planned for Hawaii, but was cancelled in favor of Kenya, where sets for The Lion (1962, see entry) were already in place. The 23 Feb 1962 DV reported that principal photography was scheduled to begin 26 Feb 1962. A news item in the 28 Feb 1962 DV stated that singer-actor Fabian would record the film’s title song that day in Los Angeles, CA, before reporting to Twentieth Century-Fox Studios.
       The 25 Aug 1962 LAT described the primary set as “a five-ton gondola.” An item in the 7 Mar 1962 DV revealed that the studio ranch in Malibu, CA, substituted for the Scottish Highlands. The formerly brown hills were turned green by an airdrop of 400 pounds of rye and clover seed and a rainstorm. The 8 Mar 1962 DV noted that 250 background actors were employed for a “slave market sequence.” The following month, Irwin Allen added a third camera crew, in addition to the Los Angeles and Kenya units, as stated in the 5 Apr 1962 DV. Filming was completed 18 Apr 1962, as reported that day in DV. However, the 19 Apr 1962 DV claimed that Fabian would not conclude his role until the following day.
       The 24 May 1962 DV reported that Allen intended to use the “forum” strategy that aided the success of his 1961 release, Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea (see entry). The plan involved conducting one forum per day in each of ten “key cities,” attended by a total of 4,000 exhibitors. The events consisted of a screening, followed by lunch and “an extensive discussion of promotion.” According to the 18 Jul 1962 DV, the process was scheduled to begin 25 Jul 1962 in New York City and end two weeks later in Seattle, WA. Attendance was expected to exceed that of Allen’s previous forum series. The 2 Aug 1962 DV listed Detroit, MI, St. Louis, MO, New Orleans, LA, San Francisco, CA, and Los Angeles among the producer’s other destinations. Also touring on behalf of the picture was animal actor “Chester the Chimp,” as noted in the 3 Aug 1962 DV.
       The 28 Mar 1962 DV noted that assistant director Jack Stubbs temporarily replaced Les Warner, who suffered a torn ankle tendon. The 19 Feb 1962 DV credited choreographer Jimmy Fields with staging the “tribal dance sequence.” According to the 22 Mar 1962 DV, character actor Billy Gilbert completed his role as the “Sultan,” and was assigned a second role as the character’s brother.
       The 6 Aug 1962 DV stated that Allen and Twentieth Century-Fox received a gold plaque from the Missouri-Illinois Theatre Owners Association for their “outstanding contribution of superior family entertainment.” Two days later, DV reported that Allen increased his order of 450 prints to 600. The 10 Aug 1962 DV announced an “all-day” premiere, beginning that morning in Denver, CO. Declared “Five Weeks in a Balloon Day” by Mayor Richard Batterton, events would include a parade from the Denver airport, featuring cast members Barbara Eden, Michael Ansara, and Peter Lorre, along with the Denver University marching band. In addition, 50,000 balloons were dropped over the city, 5,000 of which contained tickets for the premiere. Openings followed in Los Angeles on 21 Aug 1962, and in New York City on 26 Aug 1962. Reviews were generally positive.
       Casting announcements included Mike DeAnda (2 Mar 1962 DV); Al Hoosman (16 Mar 1962 DV); Feridun Colgecen and Paul Kremin (29 Mar 1962 DV); George Sawaya, Alex Plasschaert, Setrack Sassaunian, Norman Nazier, and Ernie Tate (2 Apr 1962 DV); Mahmad Tahir (6 Apr 1962 DV); Joseph Ferrante, Roy Jensen, and Frank Watkins (9 Apr 1962 DV).
The 20 Jan 1960 DV stated that producer Irwin Allen was adding a film version of Jules Verne’s 1863 novel to his roster of upcoming projects. Allen’s attorneys were in the process of investigating its copyright status. Nearly eighteen months later, Allen told the 7 Jun 1961 NYT that he had recently completed six years of negotiations with the Verne estate to secure motion picture rights, claiming the film version would feature “five international stars.” After rejecting offers from three other studios, Allen accepted a deal with Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation, which would finance two pictures at $2 million each. At the request of studio president Spyros P. Skouras, Allen cancelled a vacation to begin work on the project. Weeks later, however, Skouras postponed production for several months, as reported in the 21 Aug 1961 DV.
       The 3 Nov 1961 LAT noted that Sir Cedric Hardwicke agreed to a “floating part” in the picture, allowing him to work around his television obligations.
       According to the 30 Jan 1962 DV, location filming was initially planned for Hawaii, but was cancelled in favor of Kenya, where sets for The Lion (1962, see entry) were already in place. The 23 Feb 1962 DV reported that principal photography was scheduled to begin 26 Feb 1962. A news item in the 28 Feb 1962 DV stated that singer-actor Fabian would record the film’s title song that day in Los Angeles, CA, before reporting to Twentieth Century-Fox Studios.
       The 25 Aug 1962 LAT described the primary set as “a five-ton gondola.” An item in the 7 Mar 1962 DV revealed that the studio ranch in Malibu, CA, substituted for the Scottish Highlands. The formerly brown hills were turned green by an airdrop of 400 pounds of rye and clover seed and a rainstorm. The 8 Mar 1962 DV noted that 250 background actors were employed for a “slave market sequence.” The following month, Irwin Allen added a third camera crew, in addition to the Los Angeles and Kenya units, as stated in the 5 Apr 1962 DV. Filming was completed 18 Apr 1962, as reported that day in DV. However, the 19 Apr 1962 DV claimed that Fabian would not conclude his role until the following day.
       The 24 May 1962 DV reported that Allen intended to use the “forum” strategy that aided the success of his 1961 release, Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea (see entry). The plan involved conducting one forum per day in each of ten “key cities,” attended by a total of 4,000 exhibitors. The events consisted of a screening, followed by lunch and “an extensive discussion of promotion.” According to the 18 Jul 1962 DV, the process was scheduled to begin 25 Jul 1962 in New York City and end two weeks later in Seattle, WA. Attendance was expected to exceed that of Allen’s previous forum series. The 2 Aug 1962 DV listed Detroit, MI, St. Louis, MO, New Orleans, LA, San Francisco, CA, and Los Angeles among the producer’s other destinations. Also touring on behalf of the picture was animal actor “Chester the Chimp,” as noted in the 3 Aug 1962 DV.
       The 28 Mar 1962 DV noted that assistant director Jack Stubbs temporarily replaced Les Warner, who suffered a torn ankle tendon. The 19 Feb 1962 DV credited choreographer Jimmy Fields with staging the “tribal dance sequence.” According to the 22 Mar 1962 DV, character actor Billy Gilbert completed his role as the “Sultan,” and was assigned a second role as the character’s brother.
       The 6 Aug 1962 DV stated that Allen and Twentieth Century-Fox received a gold plaque from the Missouri-Illinois Theatre Owners Association for their “outstanding contribution of superior family entertainment.” Two days later, DV reported that Allen increased his order of 450 prints to 600. The 10 Aug 1962 DV announced an “all-day” premiere, beginning that morning in Denver, CO. Declared “Five Weeks in a Balloon Day” by Mayor Richard Batterton, events would include a parade from the Denver airport, featuring cast members Barbara Eden, Michael Ansara, and Peter Lorre, along with the Denver University marching band. In addition, 50,000 balloons were dropped over the city, 5,000 of which contained tickets for the premiere. Openings followed in Los Angeles on 21 Aug 1962, and in New York City on 26 Aug 1962. Reviews were generally positive.
       Casting announcements included Mike DeAnda (2 Mar 1962 DV); Al Hoosman (16 Mar 1962 DV); Feridun Colgecen and Paul Kremin (29 Mar 1962 DV); George Sawaya, Alex Plasschaert, Setrack Sassaunian, Norman Nazier, and Ernie Tate (2 Apr 1962 DV); Mahmad Tahir (6 Apr 1962 DV); Joseph Ferrante, Roy Jensen, and Frank Watkins (9 Apr 1962 DV).
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
20 Jan 1960
p. 2.
Daily Variety
27 Jun 1961
p. 2.
Daily Variety
21 Aug 1961
p. 3.
Daily Variety
30 Jan 1962
p. 2.
Daily Variety
19 Feb 1962
p. 7.
Daily Variety
23 Feb 1962
p. 1.
Daily Variety
28 Feb 1962
p. 6.
Daily Variety
2 Mar 1962
p. 4.
Daily Variety
7 Mar 1962
p. 1.
Daily Variety
8 Mar 1962
p. 4.
Daily Variety
16 Mar 1962
p. 14.
Daily Variety
22 Mar 1962
p. 6.
Daily Variety
28 Mar 1962
p. 4.
Daily Variety
29 Mar 1962
p. 3, 15.
Daily Variety
2 Apr 1962
p. 4.
Daily Variety
5 Apr 1962
p. 4.
Daily Variety
6 Apr 1962
p. 4.
Daily Variety
9 Apr 1962
p. 11.
Daily Variety
18 Apr 1962
p. 4.
Daily Variety
19 Apr 1962
p. 10.
Daily Variety
24 May 1962
p. 3.
Daily Variety
18 Jul 1962
p. 4.
Daily Variety
2 Aug 1962
p. 2.
Daily Variety
3 Aug 1962
p. 2.
Daily Variety
6 Aug 1962
p. 6.
Daily Variety
8 Aug 1962
p. 3.
Daily Variety
10 Aug 1962
p. 10.
Daily Variety
13 Aug 1962
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
3 Nov 1961
p. 24.
Los Angeles Times
15 Aug 1962
Section D, p. 17.
Los Angeles Times
24 Aug 1962
Section D, p. 12.
Los Angeles Times
25 Aug 1962
Section A, p. 8.
New York Times
7 Jun 1961
p. 47.
New York Times
25 Aug 1962
p. 11.
New York Times
27 Aug 1962
p. 16.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
An Irwin Allen Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Prod illustrator
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Orch
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
Spec photog eff
Main titles
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairstyles
PRODUCTION MISC
Asst to prod
Prod mgr
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Cinq semaines en ballon
Voyage de découvertes en Afrique par trois Anglais by Jules Verne (Paris, 1863).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"Five Weeks in a Balloon," words and music by Jodi Desmond.
COMPOSER
DETAILS
Release Date:
10 August 1962
Premiere Information:
Denver, Colorado premiere: 10 August 1962
Los Angeles opening: 21 August 1962
New York opening: 26 August 1962
Production Date:
26 February--18 April 1962
Copyright Claimant:
Cambridge Productions
Copyright Date:
10 August 1962
Copyright Number:
LP23137
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex
Color
De Luxe
Widescreen/ratio
CinemaScope
Duration(in mins):
101
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In 1862, Fergusson, an engineer, is commissioned by the British government to fly his latest invention, a giant balloon carrying a gondola, 4,000 miles from Zanzibar into uncharted West Africa to claim the land around the Volta River for England. Time is of the essence, since a band of international slave traders is already pushing overland to claim the territory. Fergusson is accompanied by his young assistant, Jacques. In Zanzibar they are joined by Donald O'Shay, an American playboy reporter who will write an eyewitness account of the journey, and by a runaway female slave, Makia. Sir Henry Vining, president of the Royal Geographic Institute and debunker of the invention, is sent as the Queen's envoy to accompany them. Several days later, they rescue an American mission teacher, Susan Gale, from the clutches of a bulbous, drunken sultan, and take her aboard. Also on hand is a leering, cowardly Arab slave trader, Ahmed. When the balloon is forced down by a sandstorm, all except O'Shay are captured as infidels and ordered thrown from the tallest minaret in Timbuktu; but O'Shay arrives with the balloon and plucks them to safety. When they finally reach the Volta, the balloon collapses into the river just as the slave traders are approaching. O'Shay safely plants the flag for England, and Ahmed routs the traders by stopping their leader with a well-aimed dagger. With their mission accomplished, the adventurers shake hands on a job well ... +


In 1862, Fergusson, an engineer, is commissioned by the British government to fly his latest invention, a giant balloon carrying a gondola, 4,000 miles from Zanzibar into uncharted West Africa to claim the land around the Volta River for England. Time is of the essence, since a band of international slave traders is already pushing overland to claim the territory. Fergusson is accompanied by his young assistant, Jacques. In Zanzibar they are joined by Donald O'Shay, an American playboy reporter who will write an eyewitness account of the journey, and by a runaway female slave, Makia. Sir Henry Vining, president of the Royal Geographic Institute and debunker of the invention, is sent as the Queen's envoy to accompany them. Several days later, they rescue an American mission teacher, Susan Gale, from the clutches of a bulbous, drunken sultan, and take her aboard. Also on hand is a leering, cowardly Arab slave trader, Ahmed. When the balloon is forced down by a sandstorm, all except O'Shay are captured as infidels and ordered thrown from the tallest minaret in Timbuktu; but O'Shay arrives with the balloon and plucks them to safety. When they finally reach the Volta, the balloon collapses into the river just as the slave traders are approaching. O'Shay safely plants the flag for England, and Ahmed routs the traders by stopping their leader with a well-aimed dagger. With their mission accomplished, the adventurers shake hands on a job well done. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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