The Subject Was Roses (1968)

107 mins | Drama | 1968

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HISTORY

Filmed in New York City and Spring Lake, New ... More Less

Filmed in New York City and Spring Lake, New Jersey. More Less

CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
2nd unit dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Master scenic artist
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus comp & cond
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
Hairdresser
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod supv
Scr supv
Head carpenter
Key grip
Key grip
Prop master
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play The Subject Was Roses by Frank D. Gilroy (New York, 25 May 1964).
SONGS
"Who Knows Where the Time Goes," music and lyrics by Sandy Denny, sung by Judy Collins
"Albatross," music and lyrics by Judy Collins, sung by Judy Collins.
PERFORMER
DETAILS
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 13 October 1968
Copyright Claimant:
Edgar Lansbury Productions
Copyright Date:
17 September 1968
Copyright Number:
LP36115
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Metrocolor
Duration(in mins):
107
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Young veteran Timmy Cleary returns to his Bronx home at the end of World War II and is soon disillusioned to find his parents' marriage filled with discord, quarreling, and recriminations. Previously his mother Nettie's pride and joy, Timmy now establishes rapport with his salesman father, John, and attempts to reconcile his parents without taking sides. While returning to the apartment after a day with his father at the family's summer cottage, Timmy picks up a bouquet of roses for Nettie and suggests that John take credit for the idea. Nettie is deeply touched by the gift and joins her men for a nightclub tour of Broadway; later, however, John's drunken attempts at lovemaking disgust her, and she smashes the vase of roses, whereupon he tells her that it was Timmy who bought them. The next morning, John is angered to learn that Timmy no longer attends Sunday mass and leaves for church alone. After Timmy accuses Nettie of trying to make him side with her against John, she disappears for awhile to collect her thoughts but later returns home to find a worried and accusing John quarreling with their half-drunk son. Aware that everyone shares blame for their domestic situation, Timmy decides the next morning that he must leave home to make a life of his own. Although saddened by his announcement, both parents realize it is best for him, and when he changes his mind at the last minute, John insists that he go. United at least temporarily by Timmy's parting, the family has breakfast ... +


Young veteran Timmy Cleary returns to his Bronx home at the end of World War II and is soon disillusioned to find his parents' marriage filled with discord, quarreling, and recriminations. Previously his mother Nettie's pride and joy, Timmy now establishes rapport with his salesman father, John, and attempts to reconcile his parents without taking sides. While returning to the apartment after a day with his father at the family's summer cottage, Timmy picks up a bouquet of roses for Nettie and suggests that John take credit for the idea. Nettie is deeply touched by the gift and joins her men for a nightclub tour of Broadway; later, however, John's drunken attempts at lovemaking disgust her, and she smashes the vase of roses, whereupon he tells her that it was Timmy who bought them. The next morning, John is angered to learn that Timmy no longer attends Sunday mass and leaves for church alone. After Timmy accuses Nettie of trying to make him side with her against John, she disappears for awhile to collect her thoughts but later returns home to find a worried and accusing John quarreling with their half-drunk son. Aware that everyone shares blame for their domestic situation, Timmy decides the next morning that he must leave home to make a life of his own. Although saddened by his announcement, both parents realize it is best for him, and when he changes his mind at the last minute, John insists that he go. United at least temporarily by Timmy's parting, the family has breakfast together. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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