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HISTORY

The film was also known as Billy Rose's Jumbo. According to various HR news items from 1943 through 1945, M-G-M paid approximately $100,000 for the film rights to Billy Rose's Broadway hit Jumbo. The film version was to be produced by Arthur Freed, based on a script by Ben Hecht and Charles MacArthur, that was to "modernize" the story. Wallace Beery, Frank Morgan and Mickey Rooney were named as probable stars, along with Jimmy Durante, who would revive his role from the Broadway show. Composers Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart were, according to a 12 Nov 1943 HR news item, hired to write "several new songs" at $7,500 per song for the new production. Roger Edens was named as the film's associate producer in May 1944, at which time it was announced that the film would be shot in Technicolor. Other news items in 1944 and 1945 indicated that Frank Sinatra was to star in the film, with Kathryn Grayson as the female lead. In late 1945, Rouben Mamoulian was mentioned in a news item as the film's director.
       Production plans were halted at the end of 1945, but plans were, apparently, revived in 1952, when HR news items indicated that Edens' first assignment as a producer was to be Jumbo, with Red Skelton, Donald O'Connor and Debbie Reynolds mentioned as cast members, and Paul Groesse considered for art director. According to an obituary for the trapeze artist Fay Alexander, he performed as a stunt double for Doris Day in the film.
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The film was also known as Billy Rose's Jumbo. According to various HR news items from 1943 through 1945, M-G-M paid approximately $100,000 for the film rights to Billy Rose's Broadway hit Jumbo. The film version was to be produced by Arthur Freed, based on a script by Ben Hecht and Charles MacArthur, that was to "modernize" the story. Wallace Beery, Frank Morgan and Mickey Rooney were named as probable stars, along with Jimmy Durante, who would revive his role from the Broadway show. Composers Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart were, according to a 12 Nov 1943 HR news item, hired to write "several new songs" at $7,500 per song for the new production. Roger Edens was named as the film's associate producer in May 1944, at which time it was announced that the film would be shot in Technicolor. Other news items in 1944 and 1945 indicated that Frank Sinatra was to star in the film, with Kathryn Grayson as the female lead. In late 1945, Rouben Mamoulian was mentioned in a news item as the film's director.
       Production plans were halted at the end of 1945, but plans were, apparently, revived in 1952, when HR news items indicated that Edens' first assignment as a producer was to be Jumbo, with Red Skelton, Donald O'Connor and Debbie Reynolds mentioned as cast members, and Paul Groesse considered for art director. According to an obituary for the trapeze artist Fay Alexander, he performed as a stunt double for Doris Day in the film.

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PERSONAL & COMPANY INDEX CREDITS
CREDIT
HISTORY CREDITS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Hollywood Reporter
1 Feb 1943
p. 4
Hollywood Reporter
30 Mar 1943
p. 2
Hollywood Reporter
1 Jun 1943
p. 3
Hollywood Reporter
12 Nov 1943
p. 1
Hollywood Reporter
19 May 1944
p. 1
Hollywood Reporter
23 Aug 1945
p. 1
Hollywood Reporter
28 Sep 1945
p. 23
Hollywood Reporter
1 Oct 1945
p. 1
Hollywood Reporter
25 Jul 1951
p. 1
Hollywood Reporter
19 May 1952
p. 2
Hollywood Reporter
20 May 1952
p. 12
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANIES
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Joe Pasternak Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
2nd unit dir
Circus acts coordinator
William Shanks
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Cam asst
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Robert Ellsworth
Ward
MUSIC
Mus supv & cond
Orch
Vocal arr
SOUND
Rec supv
Rec
Boom op
Music ed
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec visual eff
Spec visual eff
Spec visual eff
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairstyles
Hairstyles
PRODUCTION MISC
Asst to the prod
Unit mgr
Scr supv
Casting
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Jumbo by Ben Hecht, Charles MacArthur (New York, 16 Nov 1935).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHORS
SONGS
"Over and Over Again," "Circus on Parade," "Why Can't I," "This Can't Be Love," "The Most Beautiful Girl in the World," "My Romance," "Little Girl Blue," "What Is a Circus" and "Sawdust, Spangles and Dreams," music and lyrics by Richard Rogers and Lorenz Hart.
SONGWRITER/COMPOSER
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Billy Rose's Jumbo
Release Date:
1962
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 6 Dec 1962
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Euterpe, Inc.
16 September 1962
LP23347
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex
Color
Metrocolor
Widescreen/ratio
Panavision
Duration(in mins):
123
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Around 1910, Pop Wonder's circus performs throughout the Middle West. Its major asset is Jumbo, a versatile performing elephant, and its major liability is Pop's uncanny ability to lose the week's receipts at local crap games. One day Pop's daughter, Kitty, hires Sam Rawlins, a jack-of-all-circus-trades, who proves to be both an excellent performer and an able tent hand. Unknown to all, however, is the fact that Sam is the son of John Noble, a circus entrepreneur who plans to get control of the Wonder Circus--and Jumbo--by buying up all of Pop's I.O.U.'s. Despite his growing love for Kitty, Sam reluctantly carries out his father's wishes and acquires the circus from Pop. Refusing to admit defeat, Pop, Kitty, and Lulu, Pop's fiancée of 14 years, become a touring carnival. They are eventually joined by Sam, who has broken with his father and persuades them that he is interested only in getting the Wonder Circus back in business. As proof of his sincerity, he has brought with him their beloved Jumbo. By pooling their talents and efforts, the four performers make the Wonder Circus "the biggest little show in the Middle West." Songs : "Over and Over Again" (Kitty); "Circus on Parade" (circus performers); "Why Can't I" (Kitty & Lulu); "This Can't Be Love" (Kitty); "The Most Beautiful Girl in the World" (Sam & Pop); "My Romance," "Little Girl Blue" (Kitty); "What Is a Circus" (Sam); "Sawdust, Spangles and Dreams" (Kitty, Sam, Pop & ...

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Around 1910, Pop Wonder's circus performs throughout the Middle West. Its major asset is Jumbo, a versatile performing elephant, and its major liability is Pop's uncanny ability to lose the week's receipts at local crap games. One day Pop's daughter, Kitty, hires Sam Rawlins, a jack-of-all-circus-trades, who proves to be both an excellent performer and an able tent hand. Unknown to all, however, is the fact that Sam is the son of John Noble, a circus entrepreneur who plans to get control of the Wonder Circus--and Jumbo--by buying up all of Pop's I.O.U.'s. Despite his growing love for Kitty, Sam reluctantly carries out his father's wishes and acquires the circus from Pop. Refusing to admit defeat, Pop, Kitty, and Lulu, Pop's fiancée of 14 years, become a touring carnival. They are eventually joined by Sam, who has broken with his father and persuades them that he is interested only in getting the Wonder Circus back in business. As proof of his sincerity, he has brought with him their beloved Jumbo. By pooling their talents and efforts, the four performers make the Wonder Circus "the biggest little show in the Middle West." Songs : "Over and Over Again" (Kitty); "Circus on Parade" (circus performers); "Why Can't I" (Kitty & Lulu); "This Can't Be Love" (Kitty); "The Most Beautiful Girl in the World" (Sam & Pop); "My Romance," "Little Girl Blue" (Kitty); "What Is a Circus" (Sam); "Sawdust, Spangles and Dreams" (Kitty, Sam, Pop & Lulu).

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.