The Tiger Makes Out (1967)

94 mins | Comedy | 18 September 1967

Director:

Arthur Hiller

Writer:

Murray Schisgal

Producer:

George Justin

Cinematographer:

Arthur J. Ornitz

Editor:

Robert C. Jones

Production Designer:

Paul Sylbert

Production Company:

Elan Productions
Full page view
HISTORY

The Tiger Makes Out marked the first screen collaboration for Eli Wallach and Anne Jackson, real-life husband and wife, who had originated the roles of “Ben Harris” and “Gloria Fiske” in the off-Broadway debut of Murray Schisgal’s 1963 play, The Tiger. According to a 28 Nov 1966 LAT article, Wallach and Jackson performed in the stage play “for four years, off and on, in New York, London and Hollywood.” Eager to make a film adaptation, the two formed a production entity called Elan Productions, and sought financing, which ultimately came from Columbia Pictures, the 31 Jan 1967 LAT noted.
       The screenplay went through multiple name changes. Various contemporary sources, including the 18 Oct 1966 LAT, listed the following working titles: The Tiger Makes Out with a Girl from Suburbia He Meets on the Way; The Tiger Makes Out in the Big City with a Girl from Suburbia He Meets on the Way; and The Tiger Makes Out in the Big City with a Girl from Suburbia. The name was shortened to The Tiger Makes Out with a Girl from Suburbia, and, finally, to The Tiger Makes Out, as reported in a 23 Nov 1966 Var brief.
       A production chart in the 21 Oct 1966 DV listed the start of principal photography as 17 Oct 1966. The 9 Oct 1966 NYT noted that six weeks of shooting were planned. Production took place entirely in New York City, where locations included the Municipal Building and Grand Central Station. Some interiors were ... More Less

The Tiger Makes Out marked the first screen collaboration for Eli Wallach and Anne Jackson, real-life husband and wife, who had originated the roles of “Ben Harris” and “Gloria Fiske” in the off-Broadway debut of Murray Schisgal’s 1963 play, The Tiger. According to a 28 Nov 1966 LAT article, Wallach and Jackson performed in the stage play “for four years, off and on, in New York, London and Hollywood.” Eager to make a film adaptation, the two formed a production entity called Elan Productions, and sought financing, which ultimately came from Columbia Pictures, the 31 Jan 1967 LAT noted.
       The screenplay went through multiple name changes. Various contemporary sources, including the 18 Oct 1966 LAT, listed the following working titles: The Tiger Makes Out with a Girl from Suburbia He Meets on the Way; The Tiger Makes Out in the Big City with a Girl from Suburbia He Meets on the Way; and The Tiger Makes Out in the Big City with a Girl from Suburbia. The name was shortened to The Tiger Makes Out with a Girl from Suburbia, and, finally, to The Tiger Makes Out, as reported in a 23 Nov 1966 Var brief.
       A production chart in the 21 Oct 1966 DV listed the start of principal photography as 17 Oct 1966. The 9 Oct 1966 NYT noted that six weeks of shooting were planned. Production took place entirely in New York City, where locations included the Municipal Building and Grand Central Station. Some interiors were filmed at Biltmore Studios on East Fourth Street, and three days of production took place in Hicksville, Long Island. On 31 Jan 1967, LAT stated that principal photography had recently ended, and the 29 Mar 1967 Var cited a final production budget of $700,000. An item in the 12 May 1967 DV added that director Arthur Hiller would resume filming additional scenes on 15 May 1967.
       The world premiere was set to take place on 17 Sep 1967 at New York City’s Cinema I theater, according to the 13 Sep 1967 Var. Regular screenings commenced in New York the following day. Reviews in the 19 Sep 1967 NYT and 10 Nov 1967 LAT praised the low-budget picture, while the 20 Sep 1967 Var called it “uneven” and criticized playwright Murray Schisgal’s first foray into screenwriting. Schisgal later went on to earn an Academy Award nomination for his second produced screenplay for Tootsie (1982, see entry).
       Additional cast members were said to include Broadway actress Ethelyne Dunfee, Barbara Colby, and James Guardino, according to the 2 Nov 1966 DV.
       The Tiger Makes Out marked the feature film debut of female impersonator Kim August, and costume designer Anthea Sylbert, then wife of production designer Paul Sylbert. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
18 Oct 1966
p. 4.
Daily Variety
2 Nov 1966
p. 4.
Daily Variety
21 Oct 1966
p. 6.
Daily Variety
12 May 1967
p. 15.
Daily Variety
1 Aug 1967
p. 2.
Daily Variety
9 Feb 2005
p. 26.
Los Angeles Times
18 Oct 1966
Section C, p. 12.
Los Angeles Times
28 Nov 1966
Section C, p. 29.
Los Angeles Times
31 Jan 1967
Section D, p. 7.
Los Angeles Times
2 Nov 1967
Section D, p. 14.
Los Angeles Times
10 Nov 1967
Section D, p. 20.
Los Angeles Times
10 Nov 1967
Section D, p. 24.
New York Times
6 Feb 1963.
---
New York Times
9 Oct 1966
p. 13, 25.
New York Times
19 Sep 1967.
---
Variety
19 Oct 1966
p. 16.
Variety
16 Nov 1966
p. 11.
Variety
23 Nov 1966
p. 20.
Variety
23 Nov 1966
p. 22.
Variety
29 Mar 1967
p. 86.
Variety
13 Sep 1967
p. 20.
Variety
20 Sep 1967
p. 20.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A George Justin Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Prod des
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus comp & cond
SOUND
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairstyles
PRODUCTION MISC
Scr supv
Casting
Constr
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play The Tiger by Murray Schisgal (New York, 4 Feb 1963).
SONGS
"The Tiger Makes Out," words and music by Shorty Rogers and Diane Hilderbrand.
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
The Tiger
The Tiger Makes Out with a Girl from Suburbia He Meets on the Way
The Tiger Makes Out with a Girl from Suburbia
The Tiger Makes Out in the Big City with a Girl from Suburbia He Meets on the Way
Release Date:
18 September 1967
Premiere Information:
World premiere in New York: 17 September 1967 at Cinema I
New York opening: 18 September 1967
Los Angeles opening: 10 November 1967 at the Fine Arts Theatre
Production Date:
17 October--December 1966
re-shoots began 15 May 1967
Copyright Claimant:
Elan Productions
Copyright Date:
1 October 1967
Copyright Number:
LP34996
Physical Properties:
Sound
Eastmancolor, print by Pathé
Color
Eastmancolor, print by Pathé
Duration(in mins):
94
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

During a typically disaster-filled day, Ben Harris, an angry and frustrated bachelor mailman living in a cluttered Greenwich Village basement, learns he has been paying rent to a woman who hasn't owned his building in six years; the lady upstairs puts her leg through his ceiling; and a visit to the Housing Authority to complain about the condition of his apartment is so maddening that he nearly strangles a civil servant. No longer able to endure the injustices of society, he decides to activate the ferocious tiger within himself by abducting a helpless female and dragging her back to his lair. But Ben snares Gloria Fiske, a suburban housewife as frustrated as himself, whose middle-class husband has been ridiculing her for wanting to continue her education. As Ben and Gloria discuss their mutual disdain for society, a rapport develops between them. Gloria persuades Ben to see his former landlady, Mrs. Kelly, and demand his rent money back; she also offers to give him weekly French lessons. When Ben and Gloria go for the rent refund, the eccentric Mr. and Mrs. Kelly offer Ben a small apartment in their building to atone for taking his money. Gloria helps Ben move in and stays on for a few hours as his willing captive. When she leaves, however, Ben follows her home and, unable to resist the impulse to be near her, climbs through her bedroom window. Instead of Gloria, he finds her startled husband. Fleeing from the scene, Ben races back to the Kellys and is welcomed into their bed to watch television and eat fried chicken. He has found at least a temporary haven from the troubled world ... +


During a typically disaster-filled day, Ben Harris, an angry and frustrated bachelor mailman living in a cluttered Greenwich Village basement, learns he has been paying rent to a woman who hasn't owned his building in six years; the lady upstairs puts her leg through his ceiling; and a visit to the Housing Authority to complain about the condition of his apartment is so maddening that he nearly strangles a civil servant. No longer able to endure the injustices of society, he decides to activate the ferocious tiger within himself by abducting a helpless female and dragging her back to his lair. But Ben snares Gloria Fiske, a suburban housewife as frustrated as himself, whose middle-class husband has been ridiculing her for wanting to continue her education. As Ben and Gloria discuss their mutual disdain for society, a rapport develops between them. Gloria persuades Ben to see his former landlady, Mrs. Kelly, and demand his rent money back; she also offers to give him weekly French lessons. When Ben and Gloria go for the rent refund, the eccentric Mr. and Mrs. Kelly offer Ben a small apartment in their building to atone for taking his money. Gloria helps Ben move in and stays on for a few hours as his willing captive. When she leaves, however, Ben follows her home and, unable to resist the impulse to be near her, climbs through her bedroom window. Instead of Gloria, he finds her startled husband. Fleeing from the scene, Ben races back to the Kellys and is welcomed into their bed to watch television and eat fried chicken. He has found at least a temporary haven from the troubled world outside. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.