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HISTORY

On 11 Nov 1966, DV noted that Lee Marvin had agreed to star in Point Blank for producer Judd Bernard, which the 9 Dec 1966 edition claimed would guarantee him a percentage of the eventual gross. Early the next year, a 2 Jan 1967 LAT stated that John Boorman had agreed to direct a script by Rafe and David Newhouse, adapted from Donald E. Westlake’s The Hunter (1961), which was published under the pseudonym “Richard Stark.” The 25 Jan 1967 LAT included Point Blank among fourteen motion pictures at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) representing a $40 million investment. The film marked the first collaboration between Robert Chartoff and Irwin Winkler, who went on to form Chartoff-Winkler Productions, Inc., in 1971, and enjoyed a decades-long working relationship.
       Items in the 11 Jan 1967 DV reported that Barry Sullivan was attached to star, while the 13 Feb 1967 DV suggested Lee Remick was considered to play “Chris” before the casting of Angie Dickinson. A 9 Mar 1967 DV casting announcement also noted the involvement of actress Penny Antine.
       According to a 26 Jan 1967 DV news item, five studio location scouts searched San Francisco, CA, and the Los Angeles, CA, area, including Beverly Hills, Santa Monica, and Hollywood. Principal photography began 20 Feb 1967, as stated in a DV production chart published four days later. The 27 Mar 1967 DV indicated that the unit completed Southern California filming first around Los Angeles and at the studio’s facilities in Culver City, before moving to Alcatraz Island, site of the Alcatraz ... More Less

On 11 Nov 1966, DV noted that Lee Marvin had agreed to star in Point Blank for producer Judd Bernard, which the 9 Dec 1966 edition claimed would guarantee him a percentage of the eventual gross. Early the next year, a 2 Jan 1967 LAT stated that John Boorman had agreed to direct a script by Rafe and David Newhouse, adapted from Donald E. Westlake’s The Hunter (1961), which was published under the pseudonym “Richard Stark.” The 25 Jan 1967 LAT included Point Blank among fourteen motion pictures at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) representing a $40 million investment. The film marked the first collaboration between Robert Chartoff and Irwin Winkler, who went on to form Chartoff-Winkler Productions, Inc., in 1971, and enjoyed a decades-long working relationship.
       Items in the 11 Jan 1967 DV reported that Barry Sullivan was attached to star, while the 13 Feb 1967 DV suggested Lee Remick was considered to play “Chris” before the casting of Angie Dickinson. A 9 Mar 1967 DV casting announcement also noted the involvement of actress Penny Antine.
       According to a 26 Jan 1967 DV news item, five studio location scouts searched San Francisco, CA, and the Los Angeles, CA, area, including Beverly Hills, Santa Monica, and Hollywood. Principal photography began 20 Feb 1967, as stated in a DV production chart published four days later. The 27 Mar 1967 DV indicated that the unit completed Southern California filming first around Los Angeles and at the studio’s facilities in Culver City, before moving to Alcatraz Island, site of the Alcatraz Federal Penitentiary in San Francisco Bay. This marked the first time a motion picture production was allowed access to the island, which had remained vacant since the prison’s closure on 21 Mar 1963. A 7 Apr 1967 LAT article reported that the filmmakers received support from U.S. Senator and former actor George Murphy, San Francisco Mayor John F. Shelley, and Jack Valenti, onetime aide to U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson and current head of the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA). The deal enabled MGM to rent the prison for $2,000 per day, plus the expenses incurred to ship film equipment north from the studio and establish heat, water, and power lines necessary to accommodate the production. Additional filming was completed at Fort Point located under the southern end of the Golden Gate Bridge. Alexander Jacobs worked on revising the script for three weeks on location in San Francisco.
       According to the 1 Jun 1967 LAT, the nightclub fight sequence was choreographed by Judd Bernard’s production associate Patricia Casey, who had an extensive dance background as a student of the Metropolitan Opera and a member of the Joffrey Ballet.
       During production, a 3 Mar 1967 DV item revealed that cast members were fitted with one-and-a-half-inch microphones specially developed by MGM sound mixer Larry Jost to eliminate the need for post-production dialogue looping.
       The 27 Jul 1967 DV estimated the total negative cost of $3 million.
       That same item announced MGM’s decision to push up the release date by two months and schedule a premiere at the Paramount Theatre in San Francisco on 30 Aug 1967. According to a 29 Aug 1967 DV brief, the event encompassed two days of planned promotional “activities” to coincide with the launch of the San Francisco engagement. Point Break opened 19 Sep 1967 at New York City’s DeMille and Coronet theaters before expanding to Los Angeles on 13 Oct 1967 at the Hollywood Paramount Theatre. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
11 Nov 1966
p. 2.
Daily Variety
9 Dec 1966
p. 2.
Daily Variety
11 Jan 1967
p. 2.
Daily Variety
26 Jan 1967
p. 4.
Daily Variety
13 Feb 1967
p. 2.
Daily Variety
24 Feb 1967
p. 8.
Daily Variety
3 Mar 1967
p. 6.
Daily Variety
9 Mar 1967
p. 10.
Daily Variety
27 Mar 1967
p. 4.
Daily Variety
24 Apr 1967
p. 2.
Daily Variety
27 Jul 1967
p. 1.
Daily Variety
3 Aug 1967
p. 2.
Daily Variety
29 Aug 1967
p. 10.
Los Angeles Times
2 Jan 1967
Section C, p. 24.
Los Angeles Times
25 Jan 1967
Section D, p. 10.
Los Angeles Times
18 Feb 1967
p. 16.
Los Angeles Times
7 Apr 1967
p. 1, 12.
Los Angeles Times
1 Jun 1967
Section D, p. 1, 15.
Los Angeles Times
23 Sep 1967
Section C, p. 20A.
Los Angeles Times
13 Oct 1967
Section C, p. 11.
New York Times
19 Sep 1967
p. 52.
Variety
6 Sep 1967
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Judd Bernard-Irwin Winkler Production
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Asst cam
Col cons
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
MUSIC
SOUND
Rec supv
Boom op
VISUAL EFFECTS
Sp visual eff
Sp photog for prod
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairstyles
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit prod mgr
Loc mgr
Prod associate
Asst to the prod
Scr supv
Dial coach
Stills
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Hunter by Richard Stark (New York, 1963).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"Mighty Good Times," music and lyrics by Stu Gardner, sung by Stu Gardner Trio.
COMPOSER
DETAILS
Release Date:
19 September 1967
Premiere Information:
San Francisco premiere and opening: 30 August 1967
New York opening: 19 September 1967
Los Angeles opening: 13 October 1967
Production Date:
began 20 February 1967
Copyright Claimant:
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Inc.
Copyright Date:
19 September 1967
Copyright Number:
LP34744
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Metrocolor
Widescreen/ratio
Panavision
Duration(in mins):
92
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

After taking part in the robbery of a large shipment of cash being transferred by helicopter on deserted Alcatraz, a man known as Walker is shot and left for dead by his partner Mal Reese, who then runs off with Walker's faithless wife, Lynne. Two years later, while on a guided tour around the island, Walker is stopped by a stranger, Yost, who offers to help him recover his share of the money by leading him to both Lynne and the criminal organization to which Reese now belongs. After Lynne has killed herself in despair, Walker takes up with her sister, Chris, who helps get him into Reese's heavily-guarded penthouse. As Walker threatens him, Reese plunges from a terrace to his death. Still determined to get his money, Walker continues to hunt down other members of the organization in Los Angeles. After two of them, Carter and car dealer Stegman, die in a trap intended for him, Walker makes his way to the combine's second-in-command, Brewster. Greedy to take over the number one spot in the organization, Brewster proposes that Walker outwit the top man, Fairfax, by pulling a hijack job similar to the previous one at Alcatraz. Walker accompanies Brewster to Fort Point, San Francisco, where the cash transfer is to take place. As Brewster picks up the packet of money, a shot rings out and he falls dead. Then Yost--who is actually Fairfax--appears to acknowledge Walker's unwitting assistance in eliminating those organization men who were a threat to his power. After offering Walker a job, Fairfax points to the packet of money and tells him to come and take it. Standing in the darkness, Walker considers the ... +


After taking part in the robbery of a large shipment of cash being transferred by helicopter on deserted Alcatraz, a man known as Walker is shot and left for dead by his partner Mal Reese, who then runs off with Walker's faithless wife, Lynne. Two years later, while on a guided tour around the island, Walker is stopped by a stranger, Yost, who offers to help him recover his share of the money by leading him to both Lynne and the criminal organization to which Reese now belongs. After Lynne has killed herself in despair, Walker takes up with her sister, Chris, who helps get him into Reese's heavily-guarded penthouse. As Walker threatens him, Reese plunges from a terrace to his death. Still determined to get his money, Walker continues to hunt down other members of the organization in Los Angeles. After two of them, Carter and car dealer Stegman, die in a trap intended for him, Walker makes his way to the combine's second-in-command, Brewster. Greedy to take over the number one spot in the organization, Brewster proposes that Walker outwit the top man, Fairfax, by pulling a hijack job similar to the previous one at Alcatraz. Walker accompanies Brewster to Fort Point, San Francisco, where the cash transfer is to take place. As Brewster picks up the packet of money, a shot rings out and he falls dead. Then Yost--who is actually Fairfax--appears to acknowledge Walker's unwitting assistance in eliminating those organization men who were a threat to his power. After offering Walker a job, Fairfax points to the packet of money and tells him to come and take it. Standing in the darkness, Walker considers the proposition for a moment and then disappears into the shadows. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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