Topaz (1969)

125 mins | Mystery | 1969

Director:

Alfred Hitchcock

Writer:

Samuel Taylor

Producer:

Alfred Hitchcock

Cinematographer:

Jack Hildyard

Editor:

William Ziegler

Production Designer:

Henry Bumstead

Production Company:

Universal Pictures
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HISTORY

Location scenes filmed in West Germany, Copenhagen, Paris, New York, and Washington, D. C. Opened in London in Nov. 1969 with an ending in which Granville escapes East; running time: 125 ... More Less

Location scenes filmed in West Germany, Copenhagen, Paris, New York, and Washington, D. C. Opened in London in Nov. 1969 with an ending in which Granville escapes East; running time: 125 min. More Less

CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Photog cons
ART DIRECTOR
Prod des
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost
Fashioned in Paris by
Men's cost supv
MUSIC
Mus & mus dir
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairstyles
Hairstyles
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit prod mgr
Asst to Mr. Hitchcock
Scr supv
Cuban and French tech adv
Cuban and French tech adv
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Topaz by Leon Uris (New York, 1967).
AUTHOR
DETAILS
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 19 December 1969
Copyright Claimant:
Universal Pictures
Copyright Date:
19 December 1969
Copyright Number:
LP39052
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
125
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In 1962 Russian bureaucrat Boris Kusenov, his wife, and daughter, assisted by CIA agent Michael Nordstrom, escape from the Soviet embassy in Copenhagen and defect to the United States. Alarmed by Kusenov's disclosure of Soviet shipments to Cuba, Nordstrom contacts French intelligence Chief André Devereaux, who agrees to cooperate with the CIA. Consequently, Devereaux recruits Dubois, a black florist and secret agent, who infiltrates an assembly of Cuban revolutionaries housed in Harlem's Hotel Theresa and obtains photographs of important documents. Devereaux then travels to Cuba, where he is warmly received by Juanita, his counterrevolutionary mistress, who commands her loyal domestic staff to help her lover. Eagerly undertaking this assignment are Carlotta and Pablo Mendoza, who, posing as picnickers, from a knoll overlooking a harbor photograph the unloading of Soviet missiles. Their position is given away, however, by hungry seagulls which descend upon their lunch. But before being captured and tortured, the pair secrete the incriminating film in a chicken carcass. Having aroused the suspicions of Rico Parra, an important revolutionary whom Juanita has also taken as a lover, Devereaux is expelled from Cuba. As a token of their love, Juanita presents the departing Frenchman with a slim volume of poetry, in which is hidden the film. Shocked by his mistress' betrayal of the Cuban revolution, Parra shoots her to death. Upon returning to the United States, Devereaux discovers a leak in the French intelligence network. In Paris he learns that the head of Topaz, a ring of French traitors, is Jacques Granville, his friend and his wife's lover. Unmasked, Granville shoots himself to ... +


In 1962 Russian bureaucrat Boris Kusenov, his wife, and daughter, assisted by CIA agent Michael Nordstrom, escape from the Soviet embassy in Copenhagen and defect to the United States. Alarmed by Kusenov's disclosure of Soviet shipments to Cuba, Nordstrom contacts French intelligence Chief André Devereaux, who agrees to cooperate with the CIA. Consequently, Devereaux recruits Dubois, a black florist and secret agent, who infiltrates an assembly of Cuban revolutionaries housed in Harlem's Hotel Theresa and obtains photographs of important documents. Devereaux then travels to Cuba, where he is warmly received by Juanita, his counterrevolutionary mistress, who commands her loyal domestic staff to help her lover. Eagerly undertaking this assignment are Carlotta and Pablo Mendoza, who, posing as picnickers, from a knoll overlooking a harbor photograph the unloading of Soviet missiles. Their position is given away, however, by hungry seagulls which descend upon their lunch. But before being captured and tortured, the pair secrete the incriminating film in a chicken carcass. Having aroused the suspicions of Rico Parra, an important revolutionary whom Juanita has also taken as a lover, Devereaux is expelled from Cuba. As a token of their love, Juanita presents the departing Frenchman with a slim volume of poetry, in which is hidden the film. Shocked by his mistress' betrayal of the Cuban revolution, Parra shoots her to death. Upon returning to the United States, Devereaux discovers a leak in the French intelligence network. In Paris he learns that the head of Topaz, a ring of French traitors, is Jacques Granville, his friend and his wife's lover. Unmasked, Granville shoots himself to death. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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