A Flea in Her Ear (1968)

94 mins | Comedy | October 1968

Director:

Jacques Charon

Writer:

John Mortimer

Producer:

Fred Kohlmar

Cinematographer:

Charles Lang Jr.

Editor:

Walter Thompson

Production Designer:

Alexandre Trauner

Production Company:

Twentieth Century--Fox Film Corp.
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HISTORY

Opened in Paris in Nov 1968 as La puce à l'oreille . Location scenes filmed in ... More Less

Opened in Paris in Nov 1968 as La puce à l'oreille . Location scenes filmed in France. More Less

CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Fred Kohlmar Production
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
2nd unit dir
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Dir of photog 2d unit
Cam op
ART DIRECTORS
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus comp
Mus cond
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup artist for Rex Harrison
Makeup artist
Hairstyles for Miss Harris and Miss Roberts
Hairstyles
Hairstylists
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Dial coach
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play La puce à l'oreille by Georges Feydeau (Paris, 2 Mar 1907), as translated by John Mortimer.
SONGS
"A Flea in Her Ear," music and lyrics by Bronislaw Kaper and Sammy Cahn.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
La puce à l'oreille
Release Date:
October 1968
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century--Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
23 October 1968
Copyright Number:
LP36282
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex
Color
De Luxe
Widescreen/ratio
Panavision
Duration(in mins):
94
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Victor Chandebisse, an elegant barrister in the Paris of 1900, is shocked into impotency on his ninth wedding anniversary when his wife, Gabrielle, tells him that they "now have each other forever." Gabrielle's subsequent suspicions that her husband has been philandering are confirmed when a pair of his suspenders are returned from the Hotel Coq d'Or, a notorious house of assignation. (Actually, the suspenders were left there by Pierre, Victor's libertine nephew-assistant.) In an attempt to trap her husband, Gabrielle permits her childhood friend Suzanne, the wife of an insatiable and jealous South American, Don Carlos de Castilian, to write an anonymous note to Victor asking him to meet her at the hotel. Although intrigued, Victor passes the note on to his friend Henri Tournel, a man considered quite attractive by Gabrielle. When Don Carlos sees the note and recognizes Suzanne's handwriting, he sets out after her, with Victor in pursuit in order to warn Henri. At the hotel, which features an elaborate revolving bed designed to "defeat the forces of morality," all of the concerned parties converge in a welter of mistaken identities, flying bullets, and impending adultery, made only more confusing by Poche, a porter who looks exactly like Victor. Eventually, everyone returns unharmed to the Chandebisse home, where the real identity of Victor and Poche is determined, and Suzanne is reunited with Don Carlos. Victor and Gabrielle return to the Hotel Coq d'Or to become the first wedded couple ever to use the establishment's revolving ... +


Victor Chandebisse, an elegant barrister in the Paris of 1900, is shocked into impotency on his ninth wedding anniversary when his wife, Gabrielle, tells him that they "now have each other forever." Gabrielle's subsequent suspicions that her husband has been philandering are confirmed when a pair of his suspenders are returned from the Hotel Coq d'Or, a notorious house of assignation. (Actually, the suspenders were left there by Pierre, Victor's libertine nephew-assistant.) In an attempt to trap her husband, Gabrielle permits her childhood friend Suzanne, the wife of an insatiable and jealous South American, Don Carlos de Castilian, to write an anonymous note to Victor asking him to meet her at the hotel. Although intrigued, Victor passes the note on to his friend Henri Tournel, a man considered quite attractive by Gabrielle. When Don Carlos sees the note and recognizes Suzanne's handwriting, he sets out after her, with Victor in pursuit in order to warn Henri. At the hotel, which features an elaborate revolving bed designed to "defeat the forces of morality," all of the concerned parties converge in a welter of mistaken identities, flying bullets, and impending adultery, made only more confusing by Poche, a porter who looks exactly like Victor. Eventually, everyone returns unharmed to the Chandebisse home, where the real identity of Victor and Poche is determined, and Suzanne is reunited with Don Carlos. Victor and Gabrielle return to the Hotel Coq d'Or to become the first wedded couple ever to use the establishment's revolving bed. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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