Sombras de gloria (1930)

106 mins | Drama | January 1930

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HISTORY

Sombras de gloria was a simultaneously shot, Spanish-language version of the 1930 film Blaze O' Glory (See Entry), which was directed by Renaud Hoffman and George J. Crone, and starred Eddie Dowling and Betty Compson. The credits, cast and summary above were derived from a post-production dialogue continuity submitted as part of the film's copyright registration.
       The countries of origin of some of the production personnel and actors were included in the onscreen credits: Tamayo--Venezuelan; Tavares--Portuguese; Molina--Colombian; Bohr--Argentinian; Rico--Mexican; Marán--Italian; Vanoni--Argentinian; Cayol--Spanish; Alexis--Greek; Davison--Chilean; Torena--Spanish; Acosta--Mexican; Saa Silva--Chilean and Godoy--Peruvian. Modern sources, however, report that Juan Torena was born in the Philippine Islands and not in Spain. Juan Duval and María Miceli (María Calvo) were natives of Spain. Some sources include Rodolfo Galante, Gaby Arnold and Allan Wardell in the cast, but their participation has not been confirmed. It is possible that the song "Bienvenidos" is a Spanish version of "Welcome Home," words by Ballard Macdonald, music by James F. Hanley. José C. Barros is credited with contributing to the songs but his precise contributions have not been determined.
       Sombras de gloria was previewed at a private screening in the Sono-Art projection room at Metropolitan Studios on 30 Dec 1929. The Var review, which was based on a New York showing the week of 15 Feb 1930, listed a running time of 80 min. The film began with a prologue spoken by Baltasar Fernández Cué, Hollywood correspondent for many Spanish-language magazines. Cué later worked on foreign-language adaptations of a number of Hollywood productions, including Drácula and Resurrección . In the prologue, he praised Sombras de gloria ... More Less

Sombras de gloria was a simultaneously shot, Spanish-language version of the 1930 film Blaze O' Glory (See Entry), which was directed by Renaud Hoffman and George J. Crone, and starred Eddie Dowling and Betty Compson. The credits, cast and summary above were derived from a post-production dialogue continuity submitted as part of the film's copyright registration.
       The countries of origin of some of the production personnel and actors were included in the onscreen credits: Tamayo--Venezuelan; Tavares--Portuguese; Molina--Colombian; Bohr--Argentinian; Rico--Mexican; Marán--Italian; Vanoni--Argentinian; Cayol--Spanish; Alexis--Greek; Davison--Chilean; Torena--Spanish; Acosta--Mexican; Saa Silva--Chilean and Godoy--Peruvian. Modern sources, however, report that Juan Torena was born in the Philippine Islands and not in Spain. Juan Duval and María Miceli (María Calvo) were natives of Spain. Some sources include Rodolfo Galante, Gaby Arnold and Allan Wardell in the cast, but their participation has not been confirmed. It is possible that the song "Bienvenidos" is a Spanish version of "Welcome Home," words by Ballard Macdonald, music by James F. Hanley. José C. Barros is credited with contributing to the songs but his precise contributions have not been determined.
       Sombras de gloria was previewed at a private screening in the Sono-Art projection room at Metropolitan Studios on 30 Dec 1929. The Var review, which was based on a New York showing the week of 15 Feb 1930, listed a running time of 80 min. The film began with a prologue spoken by Baltasar Fernández Cué, Hollywood correspondent for many Spanish-language magazines. Cué later worked on foreign-language adaptations of a number of Hollywood productions, including Drácula and Resurrección . In the prologue, he praised Sombras de gloria as a worthy precursor of many more Hollywood films to be produced in Spanish. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Cinl
Mar 1930
p. 42.
Film Daily
16 Feb 1930.
---
Variety
19 Feb 1930
p. 33.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dirección [Dir]
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Presentan [Pres]
Presentan [Pres]
Supervisada personalmente por [Personally supervis
Supervisada personalmente por [Personally supervis
WRITERS
Argumento [Story]
Versión castellana [Castillian version]
PHOTOGRAPHY
Fotografía [Photog]
FILM EDITOR
Editor del film [Film ed]
MUSIC
Acompanamientos musicales [Mus accompaniment]
Trio
Arreglos musicales [Mus arr]
Dirección musical [Mus dir]
SOUND
Fonografía [Rec]
Fonografía [Rec]
DANCE
Coreografía [Choreography]
PRODUCTION MISC
Dirección Tecnica [Tech dir]
Gerente de la producción [Prod mgr]
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the short story "The Long Shot" by Thomas Alexander Boyd in Points of Honor (New York, 1925).
SONGS
"Arrullo militar (Doughboy's Lullaby)" by Eddie Dowling, James Brockman and James F. Hanley, Spanish lyrics by Fernando C. Tamayo and Genaro Veiga
"Si la vida te sonrie (Put a Little Salt on the Bluebird's Tail)" by Eddie Dowling, James Brockman and James F. Hanley, Spanish lyrics by José Bohr and Genaro Veiga
"Rosa roja de amor (Wrapped in a Red, Red Rose)" by Eddie Dowling, Joe McCarthy and James F. Hanley, Spanish lyrics by Fernando C. Tamayo and Genaro Veiga
+
SONGS
"Arrullo militar (Doughboy's Lullaby)" by Eddie Dowling, James Brockman and James F. Hanley, Spanish lyrics by Fernando C. Tamayo and Genaro Veiga
"Si la vida te sonrie (Put a Little Salt on the Bluebird's Tail)" by Eddie Dowling, James Brockman and James F. Hanley, Spanish lyrics by José Bohr and Genaro Veiga
"Rosa roja de amor (Wrapped in a Red, Red Rose)" by Eddie Dowling, Joe McCarthy and James F. Hanley, Spanish lyrics by Fernando C. Tamayo and Genaro Veiga
"Then We Canoe-dle-oodle Along," by Harry Woods, Charles Tobias and José Bohr
"Noche de paz (Silent Night)" by Franz Gruber, Spanish lyricist undetermined
"Oh, Paris" and "Bienvenidos," composers undetermined.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Blaze O' Glory
Release Date:
January 1930
Premiere Information:
World premiere in Los Angeles: 25 January 1930
Production Date:
October 1929 at Metropolitan Studios, Hollywood, CA
Copyright Claimant:
Sono-Art World Wide Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
4 April 1930
Copyright Number:
LP1216
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
106
Length(in feet):
9,500
Length(in reels):
11
Country:
United States
Language:
Spanish
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

In a courtroom, Eddie Williams is on trial for the murder of Carl Hummel, his wife Helen's employer. Jean, Eddie's nine-year-old adopted son, is the only witness to the killing. When the district attorney attempts to have Jean testify, the boy does not want to betray Eddie, and Eddie stops his testimony by admitting to the killing. However, Dr. Castelli, Eddie's lawyer, reviews Eddie's background for the jury, explaining that he was a prominent singer in Broadway shows. In the past, Helen, Eddie's girl friend, brings him news that World War I has been declared. Eddie immediately decides to enlist, and just before he embarks for Europe, he and Helen marry. In the trenches, at Christmas, Eddie disobeys an order from his captain to shoot a German soldier who is attempting to cut a Christmas tree. Later, in a similar act of compassion, Eddie again spares the same German's life during a poison gas attack which leaves Eddie severely incapacitated. While Eddie attempts to recuperate in a hospital, peace is declared. Upon returning to America, Eddie is unable to resume his theatrical career due to the effects of the gas, which has impaired his lungs, and he becomes very despondent. Adding to his troubles is the news that his wife is being courted by her employer, Carl Hummel. Castelli continues his address to the jury by telling them that Helen has been posing as a single woman in order to get work so that she can look after Eddie. One night, Eddie discovers Hummel and Helen embracing and shoots Hummel. Eddie is unaware, however, that the embrace he witnessed was one of joy and gratitude resulting from their realization ... +


In a courtroom, Eddie Williams is on trial for the murder of Carl Hummel, his wife Helen's employer. Jean, Eddie's nine-year-old adopted son, is the only witness to the killing. When the district attorney attempts to have Jean testify, the boy does not want to betray Eddie, and Eddie stops his testimony by admitting to the killing. However, Dr. Castelli, Eddie's lawyer, reviews Eddie's background for the jury, explaining that he was a prominent singer in Broadway shows. In the past, Helen, Eddie's girl friend, brings him news that World War I has been declared. Eddie immediately decides to enlist, and just before he embarks for Europe, he and Helen marry. In the trenches, at Christmas, Eddie disobeys an order from his captain to shoot a German soldier who is attempting to cut a Christmas tree. Later, in a similar act of compassion, Eddie again spares the same German's life during a poison gas attack which leaves Eddie severely incapacitated. While Eddie attempts to recuperate in a hospital, peace is declared. Upon returning to America, Eddie is unable to resume his theatrical career due to the effects of the gas, which has impaired his lungs, and he becomes very despondent. Adding to his troubles is the news that his wife is being courted by her employer, Carl Hummel. Castelli continues his address to the jury by telling them that Helen has been posing as a single woman in order to get work so that she can look after Eddie. One night, Eddie discovers Hummel and Helen embracing and shoots Hummel. Eddie is unaware, however, that the embrace he witnessed was one of joy and gratitude resulting from their realization that Eddie is the American soldier who had saved his life during the war. Hummel had come to America to repay his debt by locating the soldier and arranging to have him treated by an important German doctor. Castelli also reveals that the district attorney was the former captain whom Eddie had disobeyed. The jury finds Eddie innocent and he, Helen and Jean are reunited. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.