Man in the Middle (1964)

94 mins | Drama | 1964

Director:

Guy Hamilton

Producer:

Walter Seltzer

Cinematographer:

Wilkie Cooper

Editor:

John Bloom

Production Designer:

John Howell

Production Companies:

Belmont Productions, Pennebaker, Inc.
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HISTORY

Produced in England; location scenes filmed in India. Working title: The Winstone Affair ... More Less

Produced in England; location scenes filmed in India. Working title: The Winstone Affair . More Less

CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANIES
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Talbot--Pennebaker Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Cost supv
MUSIC
Theme mus comp
Orch mus comp & cond
SOUND
Sd mix
Sd mix
Dub ed
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairdresser
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod supv
Unit prod mgr
Asst to the prod
Military tech adv
Casting dir
Constr mgr
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Winston Affair by Howard Melvin Fast (New York, 1959).
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Winstone Affair
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 29 January 1964
Copyright Claimant:
Belmont Productions
Copyright Date:
29 December 1963
Copyright Number:
LP27126
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Widescreen/ratio
CinemaScope
Duration(in mins):
94
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Friction develops between American and British troops stationed in India during World War II and culminates in physical outbreaks between the troops when Lieutenant Winston, an American, shoots British Staff Sergeant Quinn before 11 witnesses. American General Kempton assigns Lieut. Col. Barney Adams to defend Winston at his court-martial, assuring him that the Army Lunacy Commission has found Winston fit and sane. Adams is informed by nurse Kate Davray that Colonel Burton, who headed the lunacy commission, refused to accept the report of the hospital's psychiatric head, Dr. Kaufman, who believes Winston is a psychopath. Burton is anxious to have Winston convicted and hanged to patch the strained relations between the two forces. Adams instructs Kaufman to bring his report to the trial, but when Burton is informed of this order he transfers Kaufman to a distant hospital. Adams visits British Major Kensington; this qualified psychiatrist also considers Winston to be psychopathic but has been warned not to interfere. Kensington believes Winston killed Quinn out of a feeling of victimization because Quinn, a sergeant, had the same duties as Winston, a lieutenant. Winston, in an interview with Adams, raves that he killed Quinn for defiling the white race by consorting with a black woman. Though he despises Winston, Adams refuses to rig the trial, and he holds back his defense, waiting for Kaufman to arrive as a witness. When he learns that Kaufman has been killed in an accident on the way to the trial, Adams calls Kensington to the stand after establishing that no member of the lunacy commission is a qualified psychiatrist. As Kensington describes Winston's mental illness to the court, Winston cracks and begins raving. Adams ... +


Friction develops between American and British troops stationed in India during World War II and culminates in physical outbreaks between the troops when Lieutenant Winston, an American, shoots British Staff Sergeant Quinn before 11 witnesses. American General Kempton assigns Lieut. Col. Barney Adams to defend Winston at his court-martial, assuring him that the Army Lunacy Commission has found Winston fit and sane. Adams is informed by nurse Kate Davray that Colonel Burton, who headed the lunacy commission, refused to accept the report of the hospital's psychiatric head, Dr. Kaufman, who believes Winston is a psychopath. Burton is anxious to have Winston convicted and hanged to patch the strained relations between the two forces. Adams instructs Kaufman to bring his report to the trial, but when Burton is informed of this order he transfers Kaufman to a distant hospital. Adams visits British Major Kensington; this qualified psychiatrist also considers Winston to be psychopathic but has been warned not to interfere. Kensington believes Winston killed Quinn out of a feeling of victimization because Quinn, a sergeant, had the same duties as Winston, a lieutenant. Winston, in an interview with Adams, raves that he killed Quinn for defiling the white race by consorting with a black woman. Though he despises Winston, Adams refuses to rig the trial, and he holds back his defense, waiting for Kaufman to arrive as a witness. When he learns that Kaufman has been killed in an accident on the way to the trial, Adams calls Kensington to the stand after establishing that no member of the lunacy commission is a qualified psychiatrist. As Kensington describes Winston's mental illness to the court, Winston cracks and begins raving. Adams wins his case and spends a few days of peace and happiness with nurse Davray before leaving the area. The friction between the troops is eased, and they prepare to enter battle in complete unity. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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